The Humblebee Hunter: Inspired By The Life and Experiments of Charles Darwin and His Children

The Humblebee Hunter: Inspired By The Life and Experiments of Charles Darwin and His Children

Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace / Aug 21, 2019

The Humblebee Hunter Inspired By The Life and Experiments of Charles Darwin and His Children On a beautiful day the last thing Etty wants to do is sit inside baking honey cake Shed much rather be outside exploring with her father Charles Darwin Many are familiar with Darwins theory of evolu

  • Title: The Humblebee Hunter: Inspired By The Life and Experiments of Charles Darwin and His Children
  • Author: Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace
  • ISBN: 9781423113560
  • Page: 150
  • Format: Hardcover
  • On a beautiful day, the last thing Etty wants to do is sit inside baking honey cake Shed much rather be outside exploring with her father, Charles Darwin.Many are familiar with Darwins theory of evolution, but few know Darwin the family man In writing The Humblebee Hunter, Deborah Hopkinson relied on research to create a lyrical fictional account of Charles Darwin at homOn a beautiful day, the last thing Etty wants to do is sit inside baking honey cake Shed much rather be outside exploring with her father, Charles Darwin.Many are familiar with Darwins theory of evolution, but few know Darwin the family man In writing The Humblebee Hunter, Deborah Hopkinson relied on research to create a lyrical fictional account of Charles Darwin at home with his children, discovering the wonders of their own back yard Told from the perspective of Darwin s daughter Etty, the story portrays a very human side of one of the most revered figures in the history of science.

    • [PDF] Download ✓ The Humblebee Hunter: Inspired By The Life and Experiments of Charles Darwin and His Children | by ↠ Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace
      150 Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ The Humblebee Hunter: Inspired By The Life and Experiments of Charles Darwin and His Children | by ↠ Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace
      Posted by:Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace
      Published :2018-012-01T20:21:25+00:00

    About "Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace"

      • Deborah Hopkinson Jen Corace

        I write picture books, nonfiction, and middle grade fiction I love history and visiting schools to talk to young readers My new books in 2018 include ORDINARY, EXTRAORDINARY JANE AUSTEN and D DAY The Invasion that Changed History Recent awards for picture books include the Jane Addams Peace Association Award for STEAMBOAT SCHOOL and the 2017 Green Earth Book Award for FOLLOW THE MOON HOME.My nonfiction includes TITANIC VOICES FROM THE DISASTER, a 2013 Sibert Honor Book and a 2013 YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Finalist COURAGE DEFIANCE, Stories of Spies, Saboteurs, and Survivors in WWII Denmark is an Orbis Pictus Recommended Book and won the OCTE Spirit Award for Nonfiction and an Oregon Book Award DIVE is also an Orbis Pictus Recommended Book.My historical fiction title, A BANDIT s TALE, was named a Charlotte Huck recommended book THE GREAT TROUBLE, A MYSTERY OF LONDON, the BLUE DEATH and A BOY CALLED EEL, won an Oregon Spirit Award.My 2017 books included A LETTER TO MY TEACHER and INDEPENDENCE CAKE as well as a story in GUYS READ HEROES and VILLAINS I live in ORegon.


    263 Comments

    1. Charles Darwin's daughter Henrietta tells of her father, the wonderful experiments he conducted (some of which the family helped with), and how she loved listening to his stories of his adventures in faraway lands and the wonderful creatures he saw there. I really enjoy the premise of this story, inspired by the fact that Darwin's wife, Emma, and their children often assisted him with his scientific work ("doing experiments in the garden with bees (humblebees are what we call bumblebees), worms, [...]


    2. Cute story about Darwin letting his children help in his research. May inspire parents to try some science-related activities with their kids.


    3. As bees drone and birds sing out in song outside, Etty Darwin sits reluctantly indoors learning how to bake a honey cake. But when her father, Charles, beckons for her to bring a salt shaker out to him, she’s gone in a flash, eager to help her father with a new experiment: how many times a humblebee (also known as a bumblebee to us 21st century dwellers!) will visit in a minute.Because Etty isn’t just a child of a curious father – she’s the daughter of Charles Darwin, who always taught h [...]


    4. I enjoyed the sort of retro Kate Greenaway style illustrations in this imagined tale of Darwin's family. The story is simple but informative about the man, his family, and the time period but I find the author's notes at the end lacking in that they don't describe either where she heard of this type of experiment or specifically what caused her to imagine/create it. I would also like some information of how many flowers bee do visit per minute. Is twenty-one correct? Some of the illustrations fr [...]


    5. Darwin with his family. Starts with daughter Etty not wanting to make honey cake but to be outside.Through the eyes of Etty and she tells of wanting to be with Dad. Not identifying who he is. He tells the children gathered about his travels and what he collected.He still collects. Mostly he collected questions!Love that line!We grew up asking…Names her siblings as she talks about their experiments.They counted and poked. They gathered and measured.Dusted flour on a bee to see how many times th [...]


    6. Told from the perspective of Henriette Darwin, this story gives a peek into Darwin's family life and naturalist experiments. The Humblebee Hunter is a lovely introduction to learning more about animals in their natural environments. The story doesn't provide much background and I'd skip this one unless you really need an elementary friendly book to introduce Darwin. The illustrations are by Jen Corace, the illustrator of This + That and Little Pea. Cute and charming, they are a lovely complement [...]


    7. I am thrilled that Darwin and his ideas have finally made it into mainstream children's literature. Several offerings in the past few years, including Charles and Emma and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate, garnered critical acclaim.I enjoyed this book about Darwin's children helping him with an experiment in the garden, but the book left me wanting more. Perhaps, this would be a great entry point to Darwin and his life for very young readers. End notes about the Darwins provide background informa [...]


    8. Reading Level: PrimaryGenre: Picture Book, Historical FictionReview: This book follows Charles Darwin's kids as they follow the bees in the garden. I liked the illustrations, which seemed to pop off the page. However, I felt the target audience was a bit hard to ascertain, as the book seems more appropriate for older readers, but then features page after page of the kids counting flowers. I also felt it didn't do a wonderful job of capturing the subject matter, which essentially is Charles Darwi [...]


    9. This book is a realistic-fiction story about the king of evolution, naturalist Charles Darwin. This book is great to read to young readers before beginning the first unit of sciencefor the school year. In this text a young girl named Henretta and her father, Darwin, explore how many flowers a bee can pollunate in one minute. This text introduces some scientific process vocabulary to children, which is great because they can gain a better understanding of the steps to experimenting.


    10. 3.75 StarsWhen I randomly pulled the book of the shelf and saw Darwin I thoughtOh swellI don't believe we evolved from monkeys I know we evolve and adapt I was sure I was going to really not like this book. However, It was interesting. The human aspect of the man as a father and husband and a scientist. Can you count how many times does a "humblebees" land on a different flower in 1 minutes


    11. I almost gave this 2 stars because I was just a little disappointed in it. The fact that it was inspired by the life of Charles Darwin and his children really peaked my interest as a unique new picture book. But, it's not really a great read-aloud and I think it might be a completely fictional experiment, whereas I was imagining it to be based on a real-life incident. The illustrations are beautiful, though, and kids who are nature lovers would still enjoy.


    12. Deborah Hopkinson is now my all time favorite historical (biographical) picture book author. Uh Oh, am I forgetting Jeanette Winter and James Rumford? Well I do love this book, and think it may be well received because of the recent Darwin movie, which I have not yet seen. How nice that Henrietta's voice gives us this glimpse of her father and family.


    13. Charles Darwin's family conducts and experiment to see how many flowers a been pollinates in a minute! While this is a fictional account of Darwin's interaction with his family, it's a neat way to introduce this influential scientist to children. Great in a science classroom, and a bit of a stretch for social studies!


    14. This book would be a great intro into a creative science experiment. I really liked how supportive both the parents were in the story of the kids wanting to ask questions and get the answers. On top of that there were great pictures to show the plants and insects they were inspecting.


    15. Enjoyed the 'historical perspective' on Darwin just being a man with a curious mind, rather than 'Darwinist' and the illustrations were great, but the story ends rather abruptly, doesn't it? I felt like I was missing a few pages at the end


    16. As told from the viewpoint of Darwin's young daughter, Etty, this beautifully illustrated book gives an intriguing look at Darwin as a family man, and how his children entered into the quest for knowledge, too. My own daughters' desire to learn about Darwin was sparked by this book.


    17. I really enjoyed the illustrations, but the story was unsatisfying and ended abruptly. Might be a good way to introduce a science lesson, or talking about observation of the natural world, but doesn't really stand up on its own.


    18. This is science, and process for observation, and likely how Darwin family lived, but does it work as a story? Yea, it does, but it would have to be shared in context of nature studies, the scientific process, etc.


    19. Beautiful pictures; I love the style and the detail. It was fun to see this little snapshot of Darwin's life, but I felt that the writing got in the way of the story a bit. Also I wasn't fond of the ending; it just seemed to stop 3/4 of the way through.







    20. A lovely story about a young girl who helps her father (Charles Darwin) do a bumblebee experiment. With lovely illuatrations.


    21. A fun read aloud in a science classroom to start a discussion on science experiments or to introduce students to Charles Darwin.



    Leave a Reply