Phantom Islands of the Atlantic: The Legends of Seven Lands That Never Were

Phantom Islands of the Atlantic: The Legends of Seven Lands That Never Were

Donald S. Johnson / Sep 23, 2019

Phantom Islands of the Atlantic The Legends of Seven Lands That Never Were They were conjured out of myth human error and occasionally a captain s hybris but they appeared on maps for centuries even though many never existed at all Here are the compelling stories of seven

  • Title: Phantom Islands of the Atlantic: The Legends of Seven Lands That Never Were
  • Author: Donald S. Johnson
  • ISBN: 0978038073078
  • Page: 423
  • Format: Paperback
  • They were conjured out of myth, human error, and occasionally a captain s hybris, but they appeared on maps for centuries even though many never existed at all Here are the compelling stories of seven islands which mapmakers documented and depicted in the Age of Discovery, but which really arose from sailors tales and fanciful legends brought back from the uncharted wilThey were conjured out of myth, human error, and occasionally a captain s hybris, but they appeared on maps for centuries even though many never existed at all Here are the compelling stories of seven islands which mapmakers documented and depicted in the Age of Discovery, but which really arose from sailors tales and fanciful legends brought back from the uncharted wilderness that was the Atlantic Ocean.Donald S Johnson reveals each island s dark origins and mysterious cartographic life through an intricate exploration of history and myth From the Isle of Demons, born of a fable invented by pious Christians, to the elusive Buss Island, the creation of an ambitious explorer, these places of the imagination are a fascinating legacy of a bygone age Beautifully illustrated with dozens of maps and engravings, PHANTOM ISLANDS OF THE ATLANTIC brings these legendary lands to life for a remarkable odyssey into the human spirit of exploration.

    Phantom island Possible origins Phantom islands usually stem from the reports of early sailors exploring new realms Some may have been purely mythical, such as the Isle of Demons Others arose through the faulty positioning of actual islands, or other geographical errors For instance, Pepys Island was actually a misidentification of the Falkland Islands. Phantom Islands Listverse Shares Last year , a phantom island appeared on Google Earth, just north of New Caledonia in the South Pacific They aren t simply figments of the medieval imagination Phantom islands are different from mythical lands, although as we ll see, sometimes geography and fable get confused. A list of various phantom islands recorded throughout history Sep , The island of Antillia is one mythical phantom island, and the idea for it comes from an old Iberian legend According to the story, During the Muslim invasion of the Iberian peninsula in AD, seven Christian bishops together with their communities, decided to flee. Mystery of the phantom islands solved Lands that Jan , Phantom islands are islands that appeared on maps before disappearing Among these is Thule, pictured here on the Carta Marina as Tile. Phantom Islands Rouzbeh Rashidi Synopsis As hypnotic as it is disruptive, Phantom Islands is a documentary on the creation and workings of cinema itself As such, it repeatedly revisits the fiction documentary binary at the heart of this art from its very inception in , when the Lumire brothers staged a Top Phantom Islands that have appeared throughout history Sandy Island Sandy Island is a phantom island that was discovered in located between the chesterfield islands and Nereus Reef in the Coral sea, territory of New Caledonia It was added into maps, as well as Google maps. Phantom Islands of the Atlantic The Legends of Seven Phantom Islands of the Atlantic The Legends of Seven Lands That Never Were Here are the compelling stories of seven islands which mapmakers documented and depicted in the Age of Discovery, but which really arose from sailors tales and fanciful legends brought back from the uncharted wil. Phantom island RationalWiki Phantom islands in pseudohistory This is especially common for islands in the Northern Atlantic maps depicting Antillia, Estotiland, Frisland, Bacalhau, Saint Brendan s Island, Brasil and Greater Ireland have all at one time or another been considered evidence for a pre disovery of the Americas. Phantom Islands of the Atlantic The Legends of Seven However, Phantom Islands does not live up to its billing To read the title and the book jacket, one would expect the book to be primarily about legends tales of mysterious islands inhabited by wondrous people and creatures. Phantom Islands of the Atlantic The Legends of Seven The phantom islands, as explained by this seafaring scholar, have a hold upon the imagination of those who long for some lost paradise, only awaiting re discovery But they can be relegated to the realm of hallucination or geographical confusion, unless one holds onto the belief as a kind of quixotic quest.

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      423 Donald S. Johnson
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      Posted by:Donald S. Johnson
      Published :2018-09-01T07:59:24+00:00

    About "Donald S. Johnson"

      • Donald S. Johnson

        Donald S. Johnson Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Phantom Islands of the Atlantic: The Legends of Seven Lands That Never Were book, this is one of the most wanted Donald S. Johnson author readers around the world.


    726 Comments

    1. Phantom Islands of the Atlantic is a short treatment of how "mythical" or mistakenly described islands got on so many charts of the Atlantic during the Age of Exploration.The author Donald S. Johnson speaks from practical experience about the challenges of navigation as he repeatedly crossed the Atlantic in a small sailboat, an accomplishment that I deeply respect.Given the size of the book, those looking for more detailed historical treatments of navigating and charting the Atlantic will not fi [...]


    2. This book is a bit of a tease on multiple levels. On the one hand, many of the so-called phantom islands in this book, like the Isle of Demons, Frisland, Buss Island, Antilla, Hy-Brazil, and the Islands of Saint Brendan, actually exist, and the story of Saint Ursula and her virgin companions, when properly understood beneath the legendary accretions, forms the basis for the naming of the contemporary Virgin Islands in the Antilles. So, when the author talks about islands that never were, he is c [...]


    3. The premise is pretty decent. It's a look at some islands that first appeared on maps at the beginning of the age of exploration -- not with intent to fraud, more due to honest mistakes on early maps -- and then another guy repeated it on his map, and before you know it, everyone thought they were real islands.The concrete information about the islands is somewhat interesting, although it's a little anti-climatic because more than one ends with "so, then they realized it wasn't really an island, [...]


    4. A perplexing book, not because of the content, but because of the author. Johnson seems at once both enamored and disgusted with his subject matter, respecting some tales and looking down at others with derision. At one point he even calls a legend "preposterous." How any author could do this is beyond me, and weakened any reading of the tales Johnson presented. Further, all but one of the maps are reproductions, the reasoning being that Johnson wanted to simplify them so as to remove any unnece [...]


    5. A book that seeks to capture the times when legendary islands were perpetuated, or added, to serious maps of the time before more rigorous and mathematical geography gained the upper hand.A glimpse into the times before the Age of Reason, where distant animals could become fabulous beasts and islands could be believed in, even if they were so hard to reliably even catch a site of.Some of the legends are a little intertwined, and so later chapter are a little repetitive, but it remains an excelle [...]


    6. An intriguing geography. Johnson makes thoughtful cases for what became of a number of fantasy islands that show up on maps throughout the Age of Discovery. Having encountered occasional efforts to explain places like Antillia, I think Johnson could have gone just a little deeper. But overall it is a very satisfactory treatment.


    7. I like phantom islands as much as the next girl, and very much looked forward to reading this book. This book was well researched but not very well written. I was somewhat disappointed with the chapter layouts as well.


    8. I found this to be a was well researched book, and really interesting all these islands which have now been removed from maps because they never existed.



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