The Secret Commonwealth: An Essay of the Nature and Actions of the Subterranean (and, for the Most Part) Invisible People, Heretofore Going under the Name of Elves, Fauns, and Fairies

The Secret Commonwealth: An Essay of the Nature and Actions of the Subterranean (and, for the Most Part) Invisible People, Heretofore Going under the Name of Elves, Fauns, and Fairies

RobertKirk / Aug 21, 2019

The Secret Commonwealth An Essay of the Nature and Actions of the Subterranean and for the Most Part Invisible People Heretofore Going under the Name of Elves Fauns and Fairies Kirk is a magnificent dish to set before any student of either folk lore or folk psychology Times Literary SupplementIn the late th century a Scottish minister went looking for supernatural creatur

  • Title: The Secret Commonwealth: An Essay of the Nature and Actions of the Subterranean (and, for the Most Part) Invisible People, Heretofore Going under the Name of Elves, Fauns, and Fairies
  • Author: RobertKirk
  • ISBN: 9781590171776
  • Page: 363
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Kirk is a magnificent dish to set before any student of either folk lore or folk psychology Times Literary SupplementIn the late 17th century, a Scottish minister went looking for supernatural creatures of a middle nature betwixt man and angel Robert Kirk roamed the Highlands, talking to his parishioners and other country folk about their encounters with fairies, w Kirk is a magnificent dish to set before any student of either folk lore or folk psychology Times Literary SupplementIn the late 17th century, a Scottish minister went looking for supernatural creatures of a middle nature betwixt man and angel Robert Kirk roamed the Highlands, talking to his parishioners and other country folk about their encounters with fairies, wraiths, elves, doppelgangers, and other agents of the spirit world Magic was a part of everyday life for Kirk and his fellow Highlanders, and this remarkable book offers rare glimpses into their enchanted realm.Left in manuscript form upon the author s death in 1692, this volume was first published in 1815 at the behest of Sir Walter Scott In 1893, the distinguished folklorist Andrew Lang re edited the work Lang s introduction to Kirk s extraordinary blend of science, religion, and superstition is included in this edition For many years, The Secret Commonwealth was hard to find available, if at all, only in scholarly editions Academicians as well as lovers of myths and legends will prize this authoritative but inexpensive edition.

    The Secret Commonwealth The Book of Dust, by Philip The Book of Dust The Secret Commonwealth is the second book in The Book of Dust trilogy by Philip Pullman, which is set in the world of the His Dark Materials trilogy It will be set twenty years after the events of La Belle Sauvage, and ten years after the events of the His Dark Materials trilogy. The Secret Commonwealth His Dark Materials FANDOM The Secret Commonwealth is the second novel in The Book of Dust trilogy It will be set twenty years after the events of La Belle Sauvage , and ten years after the events of the His Dark Materials trilogy. The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns Fairies Index Written by a Scottish clergyman, Robert Kirk, in , and not committed to print until the early th century, The Secret Commonwealth is an unusually sympathetic account of the denizens of fairyland, and a complex of still mysterious extrasensory phenomena including poltergeists, clairvoyance and doppelgangers here called co walkers. The Secret Commonwealth Celto eclectic Songs of Love, War, and Drinking The Secret Commonwealth has been Middle Tennessee s most enduringly popular Celtic band since their inception in Influenced by The Pogues, The Chieftains, and traditional Irish pub bands, TSC s music mixes original material with traditional music and many styles of American and European folk. The Secret Commonwealth Home Facebook See of The Secret Commonwealth on Facebook Log In or Create New Account See of The Secret Commonwealth on Facebook Log In Forgot account or Create New Account Not Now Fran Friel s Writer s Secret Weapon Dylan Walshe The Murfreesboro Pulse Thistleradio Viva NashVegas Radio Show The Stone Fox Kasey Lansdale Celtic The Secret Commonwealth An Essay of the Nature and The Secret Commonwealth An Essay of the Nature and Actions of the Subterranean and, for the Most Part Invisible People, Heretofore Going under the Name of Elves, Fauns, and Fairies . Rating details Ratings Reviews. The Secret Commonwealth The Secret Commonwealth A journey through Christian thought, folk beliefs and general musings about monarchy, literature and medievalism Wednesday, January , Robert Burns Day A Fiddler in the North A Fiddler in the North Amang the trees, where humming bees, The Secret Commonwealth David Bentley Hart First Things Oct , The Secret Commonwealth The Hidden Commonwealth rewards frequent readings, even by persons so fanatical in their prejudices as to refuse to believe its reports such tragically deluded souls can treat the book as only a compendium of folklore, if they must, and still profit from it Kirk s real concern, as it happens, is not simply the fairy realm, Pullman hopes that The Secret Commonwealth will be Article Pullman hopes that The Secret Commonwealth will be released this time next year self.hisdarkmaterials submitted year ago by quixoticreveur Pullman has finished The Secret Commonwealth, though it has yet to be edited. The Secret Commonwealth Digital Music Online shopping from a great selection at Digital Music Store.

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      • RobertKirk

        The Reverend Robert Kirk was a minister, Gaelic scholar and folklorist, best known for The Secret Commonwealth, a treatise on fairy folklore, witchcraft, ghosts, and second sight, a type of extrasensory perception described as a phenomenon by the people of the Scottish Highlands.In the late 1680s, Kirk travelled to London to help publish one of the first translations of the Bible into Scottish Gaelic Gentleman scientist Robert Boyle financed the publication of the Gaelic Bible and pursued inquiries into Kirk s reports of second sight Kirk died before he was able to publish The Secret Commonwealth Legends arose after Kirk s death saying he had been taken away to fairyland for revealing the secrets of the Good People.Scottish author Walter Scott first published Kirk s work on fairies than a century later in 1815 Andrew Lang later gave it the popular title, The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies 1893 Multiple editions of The Secret Commonwealth have since been published, with notable scholarly analysis by Sanderson, Mario M Rossi, and Michael Hunter.Robert Kirk is the subject of Netta Blair Reid s play, The Shepherd Beguiled.


    314 Comments

    1. If, like me, you read this expecting to learn something about the folklore of fairies, you will be disappointed. The beginning of the book has some of that, and it is entertaining.The best reason to read this book is that it is strange and amusing. It is written by a clergyman on fairies, the second sight, and charms; he believes in all of the above. His prose reads something like that of the scientists of his time, but he writes about what appears to us to be nonsense. He is at pains to tell us [...]


    2. Hardcore fantasy readers might find The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies by Robert Kirk and Andrew Lang to be interesting reading. Lang, a nineteenth-century folklorist, had printed and wrote a long introduction to a seventeenth-century manuscript by Kirk.Both parts are worth reading if you like the topic. The language is old, and by our standards the spelling is eccentric, but you will see where this little book has had an influence on contemporary fantasy. Definitely read the fo [...]


    3. So very boring. The subject matter - the curious nature of Scottish faeries and the faery faith of those that fear them - held tremendous potential, but this book fell far short of my expectations. It was dull and difficult reading, thanks to the 17th century grammar and vocabulary, and scattered with irrelevant Biblical quotes. If you want to learn about the faery faith, I would recommend Evan-Wentz's "The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries" over this one any day of the week. 'Tis a shame.


    4. every ufologist should read it the clear link between faeries of old and the greys of today - same drink through the pores stuff etcthis book totally blows away exopolitics 'they came in 1947 at Roswell' rubbish




    5. This curious and fascinating volume has been on my shelf for many years, and I find myself returning to it again and again. At the dawn of the "Age of Reason," new vistas of discovery were being unveiled by the telescope and the microscope; using scientific methodology, and first-person narratives collected from his parishioners, Rev. Robert Kirk proposed that the academic world should start exploring the "secret commonwealth" where the Fair Folk dwell -- a separate species, ranking midway betwe [...]


    6. This is a quaint little book (part of my Halloween reading this year!), written about 1691, by a Church of Scotland minister who had an extensive knowledge of his subject. The folklorist, Andrew Lang, wrote extensive notes concerning it and published an edition in 1893, of which this book is a reprint. Kirk wrote about the fairies, brownies, the "Little People" and phenomena associated with them. His was an age in which witchcraft was widely believed in, but Kirk denied that the "sight" that som [...]


    7. Another short but challenging read written by an eccentric Parson from the late 1600s as an open-minded (for the time) treatise on second sight & fairy-lore. Reading all your "s" as "f" is a novel experience, but that and the rest of the old-timey language did affect my reading comprehension.


    8. Very strange accounts of Scottish Highlands folklore by an Episcopalian minister gathered in the 17th century, published by Sir Walter Scott in 1815, and then re-edited in 1893 by Andrew Lang. Some accounts of being taken and then returned have an "X-file" vibe.




    9. Libro engañosamente delgado, que es un tratado sobre el mundo de las hadas y los hombres que tienen la Segunda Visión, o sea la capacidad para poder ver a los entes invisibles



    10. It was interestingly to see how a member of the clergy in the later part of the 1600's was trying to accommodate his parishioners long held beliefs while maintaining and promoting his own Christianity. He is trying to draw a line between innocence and sin. It is very interesting. It must have been very frustrating for Church leaders to try to teach this "new" religion and convert these folks when they already had a belief system that seemed almost to grow up out of the very earth where they live [...]


    11. Interesting" Women are yet alive who tell they were taken away when in Child-bed to nurƒe Fairie Children, a lingering voracious Image of their (them?) being left in their place, (like their Reflexion in a Mirrour,) which (as if it were ƒome inƒatiable Spirit in ane aƒƒumed Bodie) made firƒt ƒemblance to devour the Meats that it cunningly carried by, and then left the Carcaƒe as if it expired and departed thence by a naturall and common Death"Hmmmunds like an old explanation for postpart [...]


    12. This is a collection of anecdotes surrounding unexplained phenomena collected by a 17th century Scottish minister, and published in the early 19th century. It purports to be about "Elves, Fauns, and Fairies" but mostly concerns "the invisible world" - what would today be called poltergeist-type activity and the Second Sight. It's interesting for what it is, but Robert Kirk will win no points for his prose, the book doesn't seem to be organized in any particular fashion, and my edition was a facs [...]


    13. Poco puede decirse ya sobre este auténtico clásico del folklore céltico. A pesar de ser una obra breve y no bien estructurada, es un auténtico compendio de tradiciones orales sobre el mundo feérico según los habitantes de las Tierras Altas de Escocia. Lo más interesantes es que se trata de una obra escrita a finales del siglo XVII, por lo que está libre de la contaminación romántica, y también hay un poso racionalista presente en la obra, a pesar del tema tratado. Las similitudes de a [...]


    14. Background reading for storytelling. I hope it will keep me steeped in the strange. It is quite satisfying watching Kirk's mental gymnastics. He walks a fine line to justify how magicks are not always sinful and the Sight does not offend God. The described seers spend a great deal of time in a stupor when they encounter knowledge greater than they are. Similarly, the author blatantly refuses to explain certain creatures and phenomena in detail simply because they are elusive by nature. I like th [...]


    15. This book is a primary source from the 17th century, and it reads like one. The author, Robert Kirk, was a Scottish minister who scoured the Highlands for stories of fairies and other Otherworldly creatures. The tract was never edited. It's difficult to make sense of Kirk's commentary without a deep knowledge of Scripture and a facility for early modern English. The version I read featured an introduction by Andrew Lang; I'd like to see a modern scholarly commentary to help us 21st century folks [...]


    16. Robert Kirk's The secret commonwealth of Elves, fauna and fairies is speculative essay. Robert Kirk a Scottish minister in 1692, there is also a 're edited copy from 1893 by Andrew Lang.This is a very difficult read. A lot of concentration is needed because of the old way of writing. This is really just the thoughts of a Scottish minister in 1692 on his investigation into the fairy world from talking to locals. He treats it all as fact & adds biblical quotes to back up his thoughts. It's als [...]


    17. An extremely short book written by a 17th century Scottish parson approaching the question of the second sight and fairies as both a believer and a naturalist with the express intention of refuting skeptics and atheists. In other words, it's a loopy book written in a sanctimonious and turgid style. A fact not helped by having Victorian psychical researches serve as the book's editor a century and a half later.


    18. I was hoping, based on the cover chatter and what little I'd read about this book before I picked it up, to find a sort of catalogue of Scottish fairy stories and beliefs, but this rather short book is much more an argument for the "second sight" reports of Scots and biblical passages supporting them. Even in translation, the language is a bit obtuse; I wouldn't recommend this as a pleasure read. Anyone outside of a dedicated student of folklore will likely be bored.


    19. It was fun testing myself as to how smoothly I could read the non-standardized spelling of the late 1600s. Rev. Kirk presents anecdotal evidence and references the Scriptures to demonstrate the reality of the world and kingdom of Elves and Fairies. One thing shocked me: Forgotten Books relied on Wikipedea for their quote regarding Andrew Lang!


    20. Reading for research purposes and enjoying thoroughly. Hoping to find out more about the author Robert Kirk and his beliefs in an otherworld, especially in the strictly religious Highland community he grew up in the 17th century. And as for the way he died and what happened after? Weirdsville!


    21. A treasure trove of weird lore and language, graced by an outstanding introduction by Marina Warner, this is a work that is, frankly, without parallel: an odd combination of Burton, Browne, and Marlowe, that uncannily anticipates the cthonic imagination of Arthur Machen.


    22. Written in the 18th century, this book is a collection of Scottish folklore, focusing on the role of fairies. It is nicely written and witty, but a little overwhelming for the reader without background knowledge of the subject.




    23. I felt like all of the info in the book is presented in the intro written by Andrew Lang. The actual book was just the same info again but in harder to read language.


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