Flotsametrics and the Floating World: How One Mans Obsession with Runaway Sneakers and Rubber Ducks Revolutionized Ocean Science

Flotsametrics and the Floating World: How One Mans Obsession with Runaway Sneakers and Rubber Ducks Revolutionized Ocean Science

Curtis Ebbesmeyer Eric Scigliano / Aug 24, 2019

Flotsametrics and the Floating World How One Mans Obsession with Runaway Sneakers and Rubber Ducks Revolutionized Ocean Science Ebbesmeyer s goal is noble and fresh to show how the flow of ocean debris around the world reveals the music of the world s oceans New York Times Book Review Through the fascinating stories of flotsam

  • Title: Flotsametrics and the Floating World: How One Mans Obsession with Runaway Sneakers and Rubber Ducks Revolutionized Ocean Science
  • Author: Curtis Ebbesmeyer Eric Scigliano
  • ISBN: 9780061558412
  • Page: 305
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Ebbesmeyer s goal is noble and fresh to show how the flow of ocean debris around the world reveals the music of the world s oceans New York Times Book Review Through the fascinating stories of flotsam, one of the Earth s greatest secrets is revealed In Flotsametrics and the Floating World, maverick scientist Curtis Ebbesmeyer details how his obsession with floating Ebbesmeyer s goal is noble and fresh to show how the flow of ocean debris around the world reveals the music of the world s oceans New York Times Book Review Through the fascinating stories of flotsam, one of the Earth s greatest secrets is revealed In Flotsametrics and the Floating World, maverick scientist Curtis Ebbesmeyer details how his obsession with floating garbage from rubber ducks to discarded Nike sneakers helped to revolutionize ocean science Scientist and environmentalist David Suzuki, host of CBC TV s The Nature of Things, calls Flotsametrics and the Floating World Science and storytelling at its very best A very enjoyable, if at times dark, book Nature , it is must reading for anyone interested in Oceanography, Environmental Science, and the way our world works.

    Message in a bottle A message in a bottle is a form of communication in which a message is sealed in a container typically a bottle and released into a conveyance medium typically a body of water Messages in bottles have been used to send distress messages, in crowdsourced scientific studies of ocean currents, as memorial tributes, to send deceased loved ones ashes on a final journey, to convey expedition Plastikmll im Meer Zur Entdeckung eines Umweltproblems Funoten Vgl United Nations Environment Programme UNEP , Marine Plastic Debris and Microplastics Global Lessons and Research to Inspire Action and The Fallacy of Cleaning the Gyres of Plastic With a The barriers to cleaning up ocean plastic pollution are so massive that the vast majority of the scientific and advocacy community believe it s a fool s errand The solution starts on land. Powell s Books The World s Largest Independent Bookstore Powell s Blog Interviews Powell s Interview Valeria Luiselli, Author of Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli One way I ve been describing Valeria Luiselli s Lost Children Archive is that it reads like a classic as though, even now, you can tell that this is a novel that will be pored over and taught, and will carry its gravity, grace, and intelligence into the future

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      Posted by:Curtis Ebbesmeyer Eric Scigliano
      Published :2018-011-10T06:01:34+00:00

    About "Curtis Ebbesmeyer Eric Scigliano"

      • Curtis Ebbesmeyer Eric Scigliano

        Curtis Ebbesmeyer Eric Scigliano Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Flotsametrics and the Floating World: How One Mans Obsession with Runaway Sneakers and Rubber Ducks Revolutionized Ocean Science book, this is one of the most wanted Curtis Ebbesmeyer Eric Scigliano author readers around the world.


    723 Comments

    1. author Ebbesmeyer is and indie scientist, which is pretty hard to do, and concentrates on the the flotsam and jetsam found around oceans to try and figure out currents, climate, pollution, etc He is sort of a controversial character, but writes a pretty good book and also has a newsletter about/for beachcombers. He is integral to book "Moby Duck" tooMoby-Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, Including the Autho [...]


    2. This book is a fascinating mishmosh of personal narrative, oceanic lore, hard science and various notes on beachcombing, sneaker waterfalls (that is inaccurate, but it's what came to mind and maybe will make you more curious to read the book!) the history of plastic, etc. Some of the stuff about ocean currents was a little hard for me to grasp and I wish I had a person nearby who could explain it, because it seemed important and interesting. I highly recommend this book if you are curious about [...]


    3. At first, I thought this book was a simple--if very interesting--accounting of Curtis Ebbesmeyer's career in oceanography. Ebbesmeyer has done some very interesting studies of holistic ocean currents. When a ship loses a buoyant cargo, such as a few thousand Nike sneakers or highly distinctive bath toys, Ebbesmeyer has beachcombers contact him with the details of where the cargo washes up. Using this serendipitous data, he has made some very useful observations about ocean flow and specifically [...]


    4. I always enjoy books written by passionate, obsessed science geeks. This is not a particularly linear book, but wow, it's interesting. It does point out in depressing detail just how badly we've screwed ourselves with plastics. I knew about part of the plastic problem in the oceans from reading the magnificent books of Carl Safina, but I didn't know that there are places in the ocean where look-alike particles of plastic outnumber plankton 50 to 1. Makes it hard to get a decent meal, if plankton [...]


    5. I liked this, but it wasn't what I expected.It's mostly an autobiography. A lot of personal info. I really didn't care about that.Secondly it is pretty hard science. That may sound weird, but everything about this book makes it sound VERY pop sciencey and I would say it's a few steps more serious than that. I wanted a pop science book about rubber duckies. This was still good, and incredibly interesting but there were some SLOOOOOOOW sections. With graphs.Even with all the science, I don't feel [...]



    6. According to Curtis Ebbesmeyer, “Objects have been falling into the sea and washing up on the shores since the dawn of navigation—for billions of years, if you count driftwood, volcanic pumice, and all the other natural materials that float upon the waves. Ordinarily, flotsam is soon lost to human memory—though not, as we shall see, to the ocean’s memory.” This pretty much sums up what Flotsametrics and the Floating World is about. Throughout the book, Ebbesmeyer tracks various flotsam [...]


    7. this is the 2009 predecessor work to the more widely read 2011 Moby Duck, about 29,000 plastic bath toys lost off a cargo ship in a storm at sea and how oceanographers tracked them, plus additional material about ocean currents; another accident (sneakers); and a little about some of the personalities. Ebbesmeyer I guess just had a weaker marketing team or possibly there's something to some claims on this entry that his writing is just a tad weaker. it's nearly the same exact book, but for some [...]


    8. It's an account of the career of Curtis Ebbesmeyer and it is an interesting introduction to ocean science. Perhaps the most-surprising aspect of it is that Ebbesmeyer revives a lot of research on floating objects from earlier maritime eras. The 1800s were years when many people used floating bottles and other objects to research ocean currents. And Ebbesmeyer digs into what Christopher Columbus knew about flotsam arriving in Portugal and the Azores, which led him to speculate that Asia was much [...]


    9. Wow, so many things about the natural world that I had no idea about. This is a fascinating book about the forces that make the oceans move, layer by layer, mile by mile - and the flotsam and jetsom that move with the currents (and gyres and snarks and floating islands). Ebbesmeyer discusses everything from the oil industry to shipping practices (and mispractices) to massive junk beaches in Hawai'i to sewage runoff in the Puget Sound to how flotsam helped early explorers navigate uncharted water [...]


    10. A fascinating autobiography by an out-of-the-box scientist. Very entertaining to read about Ebbesmeyer's work in so many different fields and relating to so many extraordinary stories and people! His life is like the one we can read about in adventure novels. I learned a lot and will now look at flotsam on the beach in a totally different way! Ebbesmeyer coined the term "garbage patch" to describe the pollution in the Pacific Ocean, a term we'll be hearing more and more in the near future (unfor [...]


    11. I found this book completely fascinating. The author studied global ocean currents through flotsam and jetsam (do you know the difference?). It's interesting to read the tales of the Nike shoes, the rubber duckies, messages in bottles, volcanic ash and more. It is sobering to read about the great ocean garbage patches eternally trapped within the gyres. It's sad to read about the ever increasing concentration of plastic in the seas. The stories of the human drifters through history are amazing, [...]


    12. The field of flotsametrics sounds endlessly fascinating, but this book reads like a textbook. I should have paid more attention to the subtitle, because the first chapter, at least, is about Curtis Ebbemeyer -- how he met his wife, got his first job, etc etc. Before I gave up on the book, I flipped through the rest of it, only to find that subsequent chapters were just as boring to read as the first. Maybe someone else will come along to write a more compelling, fun book about how and why stuff [...]


    13. I wanted to like this book better, but the writing (at times) was pretty amateurish.Largely autobiographical---how he got to be an expert on ocean currents. But also some science about what those currents are and how they work. I was much more interested in the latter than the former.Lots of fun stuff about what people find on the beach, how such beachcombers communicate with each other, and how it helps him in his work. But again, just when it was getting interesting, he'd interrupt with some ( [...]


    14. A passionate study of the currents of the seas through the observation of flotsam - things that float on the ocean.There are stories and statistics of Nike sneakers (right footed and left footed), rubber ducks, notes in bottles, bodies and body parts, pumice (from volcanic eruptions), plastics, oil.The appendices are not to be missed, especially:urban legends of the seaa million drifting messagesharmonics of the gyres


    15. If you are willing to tolerate some dry chapters and passages that probably only an oceanographer would truly appreciate, there are treasures to be found in this book. Ebbesmeyer tells some wonderful true stories that teach interesting information about the sea. There are also passages which are very poignant and poetic- deeply moving, wonderful, and insightful. Overall, I would recommend the book as a "good read."


    16. This is an interesting book about the junk that floats in the ocean and the currents that take that junk all over the world. I read this as an audio, read by Eric Michael Summerer, who is a co-host of the dice tower and I met him in person at last year's GenCon. This made it seem as if the book was read to me by a friend. Other than reader, I would not recommend the book as it got a little long-winded.


    17. Dad told me some of the tales out of this one and I think I'll have to read it next. He said it got a little sciencey when he discussed ocean currents at great length, but otherwise it's about the wacky, wacky things that have washed up on shore around the world - yes, a whole shipping container full of rubber duckies, millions of messages-in-bottles, and much, much more.


    18. Well written description of how the ocean currents and gyres work. Some very technical descriptions which you may gloss through, but the interesting results are clearly stated. Also gives an interesting perception of how oil in not the problem but that plastic is. Good for someone just interested in how the world works as well as an intro to the subject for a real scientist.


    19. Not really an explanation for laypeople of how and why waves, currents, and wind transport plastic bottles to, say, a beach in Belize. This book is more a chronology of Curtis Ebbesmeyer's life with anecdotes about his work that require fair amount of prior oceanography knowledge to appreciate. But kudos to my colleague Eric Scigliano for capturing Ebbesmeyer's lively personality.


    20. This is a memoir of a scientist who found his "calling." It is as full of the beauty of the oceans as it is of the travesties worked upon the seas by humans. It will make you think twice about buying that water in a plastic bottle and twice again, if you bought the bottle, about how to dispose of it.


    21. Loved the science, expected more from "the story". Ebbesmeyer seems like a good enough guy and obviously an accomplished oceanographer, but the book overall was kind of dry and not as fun to read as I had hoped. I learned many things about the ocean that I did not previously know, so from that angle the book was a success. Just expected more.


    22. A quirky and informative book on little understood (by most) personalities of the oceanse currents and gyres that are remarkably predictable and result in all sorts of wonderful discoveries. Not just a dry academic book there is also a lot of personal reflection, humor, and "ah ha" tidbits. Highly recommend.


    23. This book gave me a much greater understanding of how the ocean works. I really enjoyed the enthusiasm that Curtis Ebbesmeyer told his story. From now on beachcombing will be much more interesting and I will think twice every time I use something made of plastic.


    24. Very interesting science, really interested in the junk patch off South Point, I wondered why all those plastic beads were in the water. Not as interested in his personal history, at least in print, but I would have a beer with the guy.


    25. (Excellent interview with the author on NPR's Science Friday, April 10, 2009.)(And a good review at the New York Times.)


    26. This book describes the wanderings of the objects found on the beaches of the world. Parts were fascinatingrts were boring. All in all definitely worth the time. It also serves as a warning about the health of the worlds oceans due to man's thoughtlessness and rampant consumerism.


    27. Fascinating book about, generally, everything that floats around on the oceans, and the currents and winds that move them. Very cool stories about the floating bath toys, sneakers, message bottles, and so on. A bit tedious to read, as part autobiography and part science. Good general information.


    28. Ebbesmeyer is prone to hyperbole, I think. But this is a very important book by a very important oceanographer.



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