The Collected Stories

The Collected Stories

Edith Wharton Anita Brookner / Jun 25, 2019

The Collected Stories Combining two volumes of Wharton s short stories in a brand new edition this outstanding selection is the most comprehensive available Although Edith Wharton is best known for her novels The Age of I

  • Title: The Collected Stories
  • Author: Edith Wharton Anita Brookner
  • ISBN: 9780786711123
  • Page: 441
  • Format: Paperback
  • Combining two volumes of Wharton s short stories in a brand new edition, this outstanding selection is the most comprehensive available Although Edith Wharton is best known for her novels The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth, this extensive collection of her short fiction shows her to be a master of all its varieties Wharton s stories owe their enduring powerCombining two volumes of Wharton s short stories in a brand new edition, this outstanding selection is the most comprehensive available Although Edith Wharton is best known for her novels The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth, this extensive collection of her short fiction shows her to be a master of all its varieties Wharton s stories owe their enduring power to portray the emotional consequences of life in a rarefied world The New York TimesThe Pelican The Other Two The Mission of Jane The Reckoning The Last Asset The Letters Autres Temps The Long Run After Holbein Atrophy Pomegranate Seed Her Son Charm Incorporated All Souls The Lamp of Psyche A Journey The Line of Least Resistance The Moving Finger Expiation Les Metteurs en Scene Full Circle The Daunt Diana Afterward The Bolted Door The Temperate Zone Diagnosis The Day of the Funeral Confession

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      441 Edith Wharton Anita Brookner
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      Posted by:Edith Wharton Anita Brookner
      Published :2018-011-19T07:50:52+00:00

    About "Edith Wharton Anita Brookner"

      • Edith Wharton Anita Brookner

        Edith Newbold Jones was born into such wealth and privilege that her family inspired the phrase keeping up with the Joneses The youngest of three children, Edith spent her early years touring Europe with her parents and, upon the family s return to the United States, enjoyed a privileged childhood in New York and Newport, Rhode Island Edith s creativity and talent soon became obvious By the age of eighteen she had written a novella, as well as witty reviews of it and published poetry in the Atlantic Monthly.After a failed engagement, Edith married a wealthy sportsman, Edward Wharton Despite similar backgrounds and a shared taste for travel, the marriage was not a success Many of Wharton s novels chronicle unhappy marriages, in which the demands of love and vocation often conflict with the expectations of society Wharton s first major novel, The House of Mirth, published in 1905, enjoyed considerable literary success Ethan Frome appeared six years later, solidifying Wharton s reputation as an important novelist Often in the company of her close friend, Henry James, Wharton mingled with some of the most famous writers and artists of the day, including F Scott Fitzgerald, Andr Gide, Sinclair Lewis, Jean Cocteau, and Jack London.In 1913 Edith divorced Edward She lived mostly in France for the remainder of her life When World War I broke out, she organized hostels for refugees, worked as a fund raiser, and wrote for American publications from battlefield frontlines She was awarded the French Legion of Honor for her courage and distinguished work.The Age of Innocence, a novel about New York in the 1870s, earned Wharton the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1921 the first time the award had been bestowed upon a woman Wharton traveled throughout Europe to encourage young authors She also continued to write, lying in her bed every morning, as she had always done, dropping each newly penned page on the floor to be collected and arranged when she was finished Wharton suffered a stroke and died on August 11, 1937 She is buried in the American Cemetery in Versailles, France Barnesandnoble


    407 Comments

    1. This 600+ page collection provides a generous 28 story sampling of the 87 short stories Edith Wharton wrote. She is quoted as saying short stories are about situation, while novels are about character, but there is plenty of both displayed here. It's the kind of book where you would have a different collection of favorites every time you read it, since the stories range from portrayals of social mores, to explorations of relationships, to the supernatural, and character sketches. What I loved (t [...]


    2. Short stories included on this audiobook:The Eyes, The Daunt Diana, The Debt, and The Moving FingerI appreciated the skill of the writer and the themes that are looked at in these short stories. However, these stories are all about upper class Victorian-esque characters which isn't what usually interests me. These stories take a little bit to get into, and I definitely missed some of the details, but overall I enjoyed it.Edith Wharton isn't an author that I'm dying to read more of, but I'm also [...]


    3. If it seems like I've been reading this book for a month I have; but it's a super long book, so there. 28 stories, only one of which (the amaaazing ghost story, "Afterward") I had read before. At any rate 95% of these I loved because they are fantastic; I may not have liked the plots of the other 5% but still enjoyed them because, well, Edith wrote them and who else writes like her?Favorites, urg, let me see: "Autres Temps", "Pomegrante Seed", "All Souls'", "The Lamp of Psyche", "The Moving Fing [...]


    4. I always fall into Wharton's writing, like an old wingback chair. Her stories follow similar lines as her stories and I believe all of her novels came out of a short story, but I think that's probably pretty common. My favorite story would be perfect to read around the fire on All Hallows Eve--The Lady Maid's Bell. If you prefer a novel, I would recommend Wharton's Glimpses of the Moon and Age of Innocence.


    5. Edith Wharton's sense of societal irony is unparalleled - it's especially chilling when her characters use truth as a subtle weapon. Also, if you haven't read Wharton's ghost stories, you're missing out, particularly in the Halloween season.





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