Counterpunch: making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now

Counterpunch: making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now

Fred Smeijers / Oct 21, 2019

Counterpunch making type in the sixteenth century designing typefaces now Counterpunch is both an explanation of the th century method ofcutting metal type and an impassioned plea for contemporary designers to incorporate the lessons of history as a means of creating typo

  • Title: Counterpunch: making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now
  • Author: Fred Smeijers
  • ISBN: 9780907259060
  • Page: 392
  • Format: Paperback
  • Counterpunch is both an explanation of the 16th century method ofcutting metal type and an impassioned plea for contemporary designers to incorporate the lessons of history as a means of creating typography in our digital age Smeijers sees the counterpunch technique as essential for ensuring the regularity of form, repeatability, and speed of production necessary for ratiCounterpunch is both an explanation of the 16th century method ofcutting metal type and an impassioned plea for contemporary designers to incorporate the lessons of history as a means of creating typography in our digital age Smeijers sees the counterpunch technique as essential for ensuring the regularity of form, repeatability, and speed of production necessary for rational design.Smeijers traces the history of letterform design to discover how technique influenced the shape of type, whether the metal punches of the past or today s computer generated forms Counterpunch is generouslyillustrated with drawings by the author, examples of early type specimens, and detailed photographs of punches.

    Counterpunch, nd edition Making Type in the Sixteenth May , Counterpunch, nd edition Making Type in the Sixteenth Century Designing Typefaces Now Fred Smeijers on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Typography is still dominated by letterforms from the first one hundred years of European printing Where were the processes and attitudes that lie behind these forms Fred Smeijers is a type desinger who learn to design and cut Counterpunch making type in the sixteenth century Counterpunch is both an explanation of the th century method ofcutting metal type and an impassioned plea for contemporary designers to incorporate the lessons of history as a means of creating typography in our digital age. Punchcutting Counterpunch Books Hyphen Press Counterpunch is packed with ideas It is both an investigation into the technics of making metal type by hand, and a consideration of present questions in type design It is both an investigation into the technics of making metal type by hand, and a consideration of present questions in type design. Counterpunch making type in the sixteenth century Counterpunch making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now Fred Smeijers Robin Kinross Home WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help Search Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library Create I love Typography ILT fonts, typefaces, the the Dec , A book about typeface design, Counterpunch is also about possible lessons that sixteenth century punchcutters from France and the low countries have for all of us today Details Fred Smeijers, Counterpunch making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now.

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      Posted by:Fred Smeijers
      Published :2019-07-09T14:59:04+00:00

    About "Fred Smeijers"

      • Fred Smeijers

        Fred Smeijers Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Counterpunch: making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now book, this is one of the most wanted Fred Smeijers author readers around the world.


    910 Comments

    1. This is a fantastic book not only for people interested in type design, but also graphic designers and anyone working with type in their daily lives. It starts with an introduction of the fundamentals of type: terminology, letterforms and the relationship between the black and white space. Then it delves into the history of printing, how it was done, and the role of a punchcutter. Smeijers doesn't stop at the 16th century, he goes on to explain what happened since then, and the challenges we fac [...]


    2. I reserve five stars for books that change me or change the way I see the world. When you've finished reading Bringhurst's The Elements of Typographic Style, read this and get a much deeper insight into type design and craft. Smeijers' basic argument, to oversimplify, is that the 16th-century type designers -- punchcutters -- weren't 'designers' in any recognizable modern sense. Rather, they were closer to sculptors, thinking about metal type in three dimensions rather than two, and working at 1 [...]


    3. A lot of books about typography start with the way calligraphers form letters with pen and ink. This is of course related to how type designers design type, but when people were first printing from metal type, what they did didn't have very much to do with writing with a pen. Instead, they made the type from a "punch", which was a metal image of the letter, and one of the ways they made the punch was with a "counterpunch", which might carve out a blank place in the middle of the letter. They mig [...]


    4. This book illuminates type design from a surprising focus: the making and use of counterpunches in early type founding. This explains why so many modern faces fail to surpass the early ones: the early ones necessarily focused first on the counters, or white space, and only secondarily on the black bits. I'm sold. Great illustrations scattered throughout, the best of which are hand-drawn by the author to show exactly what he means, and they do a fantastic job of it. It consistently surprised and [...]


    5. This text covers the history and process so thoroughly and the abundant images added clarity. It may not be of interest to everyone, but if you study or work with type this book is fascinating. Very detailed.


    6. An in depth look at the history of metal type. Most principles defined in 1500's still apply today, so it's great to see how little has changed in the philosophy of type-making over all these centuries.Though, definitely not recommended for beginners.


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