Wheat that Springeth Green

Wheat that Springeth Green

J.F. Powers / Aug 21, 2019

Wheat that Springeth Green Wheat That Springeth Green J F Powers s beautifully realized final work is a comic foray into the commercialized wilderness of modern American life Its hero Joe Hackett is a high school track star

  • Title: Wheat that Springeth Green
  • Author: J.F. Powers
  • ISBN: 9780940322240
  • Page: 389
  • Format: Paperback
  • Wheat That Springeth Green, J F Powers s beautifully realized final work, is a comic foray into the commercialized wilderness of modern American life Its hero, Joe Hackett, is a high school track star who sets out to be a saint But seminary life and priestly apprenticeship soon damp his ardor, and by the time he has been given a parish of his own he has traded in his hWheat That Springeth Green, J F Powers s beautifully realized final work, is a comic foray into the commercialized wilderness of modern American life Its hero, Joe Hackett, is a high school track star who sets out to be a saint But seminary life and priestly apprenticeship soon damp his ardor, and by the time he has been given a parish of his own he has traded in his hair shirt for the consolations of baseball and beer Meanwhile Joe s higher ups are pressing for an increase in profits from the collection plate, suburban Inglenook s biggest business wants to launch its new line of missiles with a blessing, and not all that far away, in Vietnam, a war is going on Joe wants to duck and cover, but in the end, almost in spite of himself, he is condemned to do something right.J F Powers was a virtuoso of the American language with a perfect ear for the telling clich and an unfailing eye for the kitsch that clutters up our lives This funny and very moving novel about the making and remaking of a priest is one of his finest achievements.

    Wheat That Springeth Green, by J F Powers May Wheat That Springeth Green, by J F Powers May Selection In a sense, Wheat That Springeth Green conveys the anguish of a writer trying to make sense of the world from the early s to the late s It tells the story of a priest, who grows up in the late s, is ordained in the s and who struggles mightily with the changes of church, Wheat that Springeth Green by J.F Powers Community Reviews Wheat that Springeth Green follows the life of Fr Joe Hackett from childhood, through seminary, early priesthood to late middle age and disillusionment It is also eccentrically droll I found myself rereading each section to pick up even most of the subtleties It would take a couple careful reads to get them all. Wheat that Springeth Green by J.F Powers May , Wheat That Springeth Green, J F Powers s beautifully realized final work, is a comic foray into the commercialized wilderness of modern American life Its hero, Joe Hackett, is a high school track star who sets out to be a saint. Wheat that Springeth Green Wheat That Springeth Green is J F Powers s last novel It chronicles the childhood, adolescence, and adulthood of Joe Hackett, a Midwestern Catholic who becomes a priest and dreams of being a saint. Wheat That Springeth Green Analysis eNotes Wheat That Springeth Green WHEAT THAT SPRINGETH GREEN, nominated for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction, centers on Joe Hackett, Powers most engaging protagonist The setting is the Midwest the first decades of Joe s life are shown in fictional snapshots, brief episodes. Wheat That Springeth Green Summary eNotes Summary Wheat That Springeth Green traces the spiritual development of a Roman Catholic priest, Father Joe Hackett, from an adolescent display of the outward manifestations of saintliness at the seminary, through a middle period in which he sinks deeper into the ways of the world, to a final and sudden transformation in which he achieves Wheat that springeth green Book, WorldCat Note Citations are based on reference standards However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. wheat that springeth green YouTube Apr , THIS MAN DIED DURING SURGERY, MET GOD ASKED HIM, WHAT S THE MEANING OF LIFE Duration Living For Christ ,, views Now the Green Blade Riseth The Wischik Family Now the green blade riseth from the buried grain, Wheat that in dark earth many days has lain Love lives again, that with the dead has been Love is come again, like wheat that springeth green. NOW THE GREEN BLADE RISETH Digital Songs and Hymns Now the green blade riseth from the buried grain, wheat that in dark earth many days has lain Love lives again, that with the dead has been Love is come again like wheat that springeth green Verse In the grave they laid him, Love who had been slain thinking that he would never wake again,

    • Best Read [J.F. Powers] í Wheat that Springeth Green || [Classics Book] PDF ↠
      389 J.F. Powers
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      Posted by:J.F. Powers
      Published :2018-012-25T07:49:52+00:00

    About "J.F. Powers"

      • J.F. Powers

        James Farl Powers was an American novelist and short story writer who often drew his inspiration from developments in the Catholic Church, and was known for his studies of Catholic priests in the Midwest Although not a priest himself, he is known for having captured a clerical idiom in postwar North America.Powers was a conscientious objector during World War II, and went to prison for it Later he worked as a hospital orderly His first writing experiment began as a spiritual exercise during a religious retreat His work has long been admired for its gentle satire and its astonishing ability to recreate with a few words the insular but gradually changing world of post WWII American Catholicism Evelyn Waugh, Flannery O Connor, and Walker Percy praised his work, and Frank O Connor spoke of him as among the greatest living storytellers.


    825 Comments

    1. Not many books can straddle laugh out-loud funny and painfully sad at the same time. Wheat that Springeth Green follows the life of Fr. Joe Hackett from childhood, through seminary, early priesthood to late middle age and disillusionment. It is also eccentrically droll; I found myself rereading each section to pick up even most of the subtleties. It would take a couple more careful reads to get them all. The book is packed with clever detail, ironic and poignant. Sadly this is one of those books [...]


    2. UPDATE: i have officially upgraded this book to 5 stars. it's been over a month since i read it and i just love it more and more. i feel like those priests are still out there living somewhere inside the world in my head, and that's usually not something that happens to me with books. i'm usually not even really into realistic character creation. but god damn these characters were good and god damn this book was good. READ IT!ORIGINAL REVIEW: i don't really know how to describe what's so great a [...]


    3. The gist of this book -- and I feel a bit guilty, or idiotic, for reducing it to a gist -- can be summed up in this passage: "The greatest job in the world, divinely instituted and so on, was that of the [Catholic] priest, and yet it was still a job -- a marrying, burying, sacrificing job, plus whatever good could be done on the side. It was not a crusade. Turn it into one, as some guys were trying to do, and you asked too much of it, of yourself, and of ordinary people, invited nervous breakdow [...]


    4. i'm not generally too excited about religious topics and stories, and even less about catholic ones, but this subtle, humorous, and ultimately real-world and profound, really struck me as masterful and hard hitting. yes, it;s a bit dated, talking about the start of the Vietnam war and the duty of the church to what? following orders vs conscientiousness (see German Catholics circa 1938), plus also money in usa vs christian charity, also sex vs celibacy, humor (dry, very very dry) vs literalesnes [...]


    5. At times this book treats religion with as little reverence as a novel possibly can. The rest of the time it exposes the many doors that can lead a Catholic priest to mediocrity.Wheat That Springeth Green is a book that was featured in literary critic James Wood's first collected works of criticism. Wood began as a Catholic and then lost his way because of the Church's (and religions') philosophical inability with the question of evil.This novel will certainly appeal to anyone who's traversed Wo [...]


    6. I first read this book when it was published in 1988 and just finished reading it again after 23 years. I then thought it a near-great novel but now realize I was grossly mistaken: it is not only a truly great novel but one of the great American comic fiction masterpieces. A lot of contemporary readers have probably never heard of J. F. Powers (his National Book Award came back in 1963)and I suspect some who have might have been deterred from reading his work by its predominate subject: post-Wor [...]


    7. Powers' second and final novel, and much better than his pretty damn good Morte D'Durban. Wheat took forever to write, which is usually a very bad thing, but in this case Powers somehow makes it work, perhaps because the usual late style stuff (pessimism, grouchiness and so on) fits so well with the late stages of this book. Father Hackett watches his small world change with good humor and dismay; he might not admit it, but it's fairly clear that he himself is just as much to blame for those cha [...]


    8. J. F. Powers wrote only two novels in his life, this one in 1988 and a national book award winner in l960. I think this may be a better novel, but it covers the same ground - the conflicts between religious and secular concerns. In this novel, the protagonist is a Catholic priest who heads a large suburban church. He has to navigate a treacherous course between individual principles of what he considers "good" and organizational compromise, mostly revolving around money concerns. the novel trans [...]


    9. I don't recall where I heard about this book or author, but I'm glad I did. J.F. Powers is an entertaining storyteller that uses a unique writing style, particularly sentence structure, to convey the mood of any situation, and the result is usually laughter. Wheat That Springeth Green is the chronicle of a man named Joe Hackett from boyhood to priesthood. It involves pursuits of righteous piety via hairshirts all the way to sipping aperitifs in the rectory barcalounger watching baseball. Powers [...]


    10. Updike once said that a reviewer must never judge a book harshly for not doing what its author never set out to do. I had to keep this in the forefront of my mind as I read about the priestly formation and ministry of Father Joe.As a priest myself, I found it interesting that Powers entirely neglects what every priest actually does most of his week: administer the sacraments, counsel the doubtful, instruct the ignorant, and visit the sick. These things are more or less inescapable in the life of [...]


    11. 2 stars rounded up to 3.Here's a conversation I had trying to convince someone they would like this book. "You might like this. It's about a priest.""What's it about?""A priest. it's funny.""Yeah. But what's is about?""It's about being a priest in the 70s. It's funny."I can't give him an exciting plot (It's about a priest, for Crissake!) so needless to say, he wasn't interested. But he should have been. He loved the Confederacy of Dunces and the 1970s send-up humor is quite similar. He also grew [...]


    12. I admire the intention of this book. As I conceive it: 'Where does the youthful intention of sanctity lead?'But I couldn't follow the evolution of the protagonist. We get some childhood scenes. How do these connect with the teenager and his dreams of sex? In the book these are painted as real, but please, that was an adolescent fantasy. And how do get from the sex scenes to the self-afflicted religion and the hair shirt. Does he feel a deep remorse and shame? We never get to know. The most incre [...]


    13. I wanted to feel less ambivalent about this book. It is indeed humorous, but sometimes the characters are caricatures, so much so that the humor becomes less witty. Joe's early days in seminary are a study in the comedy of youthful bravado, poking fun at the earnestness of a sometimes misplaced faith.While the comedy does at times seem forced, Powers' satirical observations are unmistakable and unapologetic. Ironies come out of hiding, like the dustbunnies underneath Joe's Barcalounger.


    14. This book is a foray into the world of priests, curates, and Catholic fundraising. The conversations are droll and the personalities of the priests are as different as those you might find in a public restaurant. I felt somewhat that the book ended abruptly - I had realized suddenly that I was close to finishing it and that it must have some cataclysmic ending, but no, it just ended. So -- 3 stars.


    15. J.F. Powers did not write much, but what he did was filled with great perception into the human condition, phrased in brilliant dialogue.Again I am grateful to Seth for recommending Powers to me. His books are, in my opinion, "keepers."(Will he ever be so recognized as being worthy of inclusion in The Library of America? I certainly hope so, and herewith place my order whenever it appears.)


    16. It's often said that what the 21st century Roman Catholic Church needs is a modern-day St. Thomas to reinvigorate its intellectual tradition. I believe it needs a J.F. Powers for its literary one. This is a novel to revisit again and again and again.




    17. Absolutely loved this, as I did Morte D'Urban and Powers's collected stories. So wry and funny and smart and subtle.


    18. I thought this was well written but mostly went over my head. I feel like that is mostly my head's fault, however. Enjoyed the read even though I didn't really get it.





    19. Joe is perhaps not an immediately likable character, but by the end of the book I found myself liking him quite a bit. I can certainly associate with his daydreams of playing major league baseball, though mine involved an NBA career that never came close to happening. Joe's story is not one of a devoutly driven man, but one of a man who chooses a religious calling expecting it to be something it's not. Also realistic to me are Joe's daydreams of imaginary conversations. There are segments where [...]


    20. I have a hard time knowing where to begin here. Powers is an excellent author, and although the book had no plot, it was an easy read. It was the lack of plot that most troubled me. The subject matter was interesting enough, a priest resisting complacency in an environment which necessitates compromise. The reader is witness to Father Jim's maturation and then we marvel at how far he's come as he stands in contrast to young Father Bill. Their relationship is captured in what was perhaps the best [...]


    21. This is a pretty quiet novel. It's got meat to it, and the prose is tight and vivid, but it's a pretty quiet one. I enjoyed it, but I didn't quite see what the fuss was about. Maybe it strikes Catholics more than non-Catholics and I just wasn't the right one to appreciate it properly. Frankly, I'm not sure. I just know that I could appreciate it as a good book, but not quite see it as a book for the ages.


    22. I don't get the rave reviews that this book receives. Does it offer flawed characters that you can't help but follow? No. Does it give insight into life in the rectory? No. Is it a revelation about the inner workings of the Catholic Church? Not really. To put it succinctly, 1974 called and wants its plot back.


    23. Super funny, understated, look at the quotidian life of a priest and his battles with worldly and extra-worldly issues. Powers nails the feel of catholic life in MN and had me rolling with the unique names of the characters all who I'm sure I hung out with their younger siblings.


    24. enjoyed this book, but not as much as Morte d'Urban which covers much of the same ground. Urban is one of my favorite books of the 20th century. This is very good, but I found the main priest to be less interesting. Still and easy read.


    25. Annie Proulx listed this as one of her favorite novels, which is enough to make me want to check it out. In my eyes, anyone who can write as well as she can has earned an unquestioned recommendation.


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