Where Reasons End

Where Reasons End

Yiyun Li / Dec 07, 2019

Where Reasons End A brilliant writer imagines a fictional conversation between a mother and the teenage son she lost to suicide Yiyun Li confronts grief and transforms it into art in a book of surprising beauty and lo

  • Title: Where Reasons End
  • Author: Yiyun Li
  • ISBN: 198481737X
  • Page: 469
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A brilliant writer imagines a fictional conversation between a mother and the teenage son she lost to suicide Yiyun Li confronts grief and transforms it into art, in a book of surprising beauty and love.The narrator writes, I had but one delusion, which I held onto with all my willpower we once gave Nikolai a life of flesh and blood and I m doing it over again, this ti A brilliant writer imagines a fictional conversation between a mother and the teenage son she lost to suicide Yiyun Li confronts grief and transforms it into art, in a book of surprising beauty and love.The narrator writes, I had but one delusion, which I held onto with all my willpower we once gave Nikolai a life of flesh and blood and I m doing it over again, this time by words. Written in the months after the author lost a child to suicide and composed as a story cycle, this conversation between mother and child unfolds in a timeless world Deeply intimate, poignant, and moving, these conversations portray the love and complexity in a relationship across generations, even as they capture the pain of sadness, longing, and loss.In writing this book, Yiyun Li was inspired by a line from Proust s Remembrance of Things Past Ideas come to us as the successors to griefs, and griefs, at the moment when they change into ideas, lose some part of their power to injure the heart the transformation itself, even, for an instant, releases suddenly a little joy Meeting life s deepest sorrow with originality, precision and poise, Where Reasons End is suffused with intimacy, inescapable pain, and fierce love Get A Copy Kindle Store KoboOnline StoresAudibleBarnes NobleWalmart eBooksApple BooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryIndigoAlibrisBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Or buy for Hardcover, 192 pages Expected publication February 5th 2019 by Random House More Details ISBN 198481737X ISBN13 9781984817372 Other Editions 4 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail edit details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about Where Reasons End, please sign up

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    Lists with This Book Anticipated Literary Reads For Readers of Color 2019 236 books 87 voters The Millions Most Anticipated The Great First Half 2019 Book Preview January March 84 books 12 voters More lists with this book Community Reviews Showing 1 30 Rating details Sort Default Filter Jan 20, 2019 Mary rated it it was amazing The unspeakable is a wound that stays open always, always, and forever There is no good language when it comes to the unspeakable, I thought There is no precision, no originality, no perfection In the case of Yiyun Li s novel Where Reasons End, the unspeakable is the suicide of the narrator s 16 year old son, Nikolai a boy the same age as Li s own son was when he took his own life This book, written in the aftermath of that suicide, is a series of imagined discussions between Nikolai a The unspeakable is a wound that stays open always, always, and forever There is no good language when it comes to the unspeakable, I thought There is no precision, no originality, no perfection In the case of Yiyun Li s novel Where Reasons End, the unspeakable is the suicide of the narrator s 16 year old son, Nikolai a boy the same age as Li s own son was when he took his own life This book, written in the aftermath of that suicide, is a series of imagined discussions between Nikolai and his mother in the three months after his death There is no sentimentality or mawkishness here Li is not angry or accusatory or searching for answers or reasons I didn t want to explain A mother s job is to enfold, not unfold And that is what Where Reasons End does it enfolds the reader in these conversations between Nikolai and his mother, who banter and argue and reminisce about words and writing and grammar and philosophy with a fierce intelligence that brings their relationship alive and makes its loss all the profound and heartbreaking I had but one delusion, Nikolai s mother writes, which I held onto with all my willpower We once gave Nikolai a life of flesh and blood, and I m doing it over again, this time by words I thought this book was stunning The suicide of a child must be all parents worst nightmare it certainly is mine And reading Where Reasons End means facing this fear head on and exposing yourself to the full searing force of a mother s raw grief It was not an easy read by any means, but one that was so brave and beautifully wrought that I devoured it in spite of the difficulty There are so many passages from it that I highlighted and could quote here, but I ll end on something Nikolai s mother says about her attempt to address her grief through her writing Words fall short, yes, but sometimes their shadows can reach the unspeakable Li s words in this extraordinary book do just that Highly recommended.I would like to thank Random House and NetGalley for providing me an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review flag 12 likesLike see review Jan 02, 2019 Anita Pomerantz rated it liked it This short novel imagines a series of conversations between a grieving mother and her dead son Ostensibly it is about grief and the questions that arise after the sudden loss of a loved one A loved one that should not have died first However, I really didn t find this book all that emotionally moving Some people will describe the mother son interactions as witty, but for me, the son s voice is very snarky In some ways, this tone keeps the book from being maudlin But I will admit to thinkin This short novel imagines a series of conversations between a grieving mother and her dead son Ostensibly it is about grief and the questions that arise after the sudden loss of a loved one A loved one that should not have died first However, I really didn t find this book all that emotionally moving Some people will describe the mother son interactions as witty, but for me, the son s voice is very snarky In some ways, this tone keeps the book from being maudlin But I will admit to thinking to myself on occasion, are you sure you miss this kid Of course, as a mother, I know how what kids say and what kids feel can be entirely divorced from one another, but the banter kept me from feeling as much empathy as perhaps I was supposed to be feeling.Putting all that to the side for a moment, this book is about something else beyond loss and death It is about words And for me, that was the most compelling reason to read this book If you are a person who likes to think about the language, how it used, and what it really means, you will love this piece of literature I see this book as one that will be used in college lit classes forever There s so much to discuss and unpack here that I truly regretted reading it alone flag 8 likesLike see review View 1 comment Jan 23, 2019 Vincent Scarpa rated it it was amazing Unspeakably beautiful and indescribably heartbreaking, for reasons obvious and uncannily personal It s been some time since a book left me such a guttural, whimpering wreck flag 5 likesLike see review Emma Eisenberg ooh Jan 29, 2019 07 54AM Vincent Scarpa Emma it s brutal, but worth it Jan 30, 2019 12 24AM Nov 16, 2018 Lolly K Dandeneau rated it really liked it via my blog Since Nikolai s death I had asked people to send poems They came like birds from different lands, each carrying its own mourning notes I felt the deep sorrow expressed in this novel so much I researched the author I wondered, did she herself lose a son to suicide, only to discover about Yuyin Li s own breakdown Li wrote a memoir Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life while she was struggling with deep depression In Wher via my blog Since Nikolai s death I had asked people to send poems They came like birds from different lands, each carrying its own mourning notes I felt the deep sorrow expressed in this novel so much I researched the author I wondered, did she herself lose a son to suicide, only to discover about Yuyin Li s own breakdown Li wrote a memoir Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life while she was struggling with deep depression In Where Reasons End, Yuyin Li tells a fictional tale of a mother composing a story in conversation between she and her son, who has taken his own life This is a story about the elusive presence of grief, how it transforms us even if we don t understand it It is a mother reflecting on memory, where her son can now only live for her, and questioning how memory isn t enough If she can just keep the conversation going, she can keep him alive, stop the essence of him that lingers from escaping, disappearing Too, she knows words are incapable of expressing the all consuming sorrow, pain That clich s cannot carry us through life, nor the losses in one How to recapture time How to breathe and exist through the worse thing that can ever happen, to know her son has succeeded in the biggest win of hide and seek I was almost you once, and that s why I have allowed myself to make up this world to talk with you Our narrator promised her son she would understand, didn t she Her own past sufferings, were they inherent in the blood She can t lose him than she already has The old things remain, things Nikolai made or wrote, remembrances of the Nikolai his friends knew, objects she has never kept tract of nor made an effort to freeze in time, not much of a keeper of life s detritus nor treasures unlike other mothers whom fiercely cling to things This conversation is made up, right but sometimes what you make up is realer than the real Such a bright boy, whose perfection hurt him too much to anchor him to the world.Not a day will pass, when you re left behind, that you don t imagine how your loved one would react to each of your remaining days, from the mundane to the eventful It truly is a novel about inescapable pain and the solitude of grief There is a gut wrenching chapter, Catchers in the Rain that left a lump in my throat because there isn t anything thing left to catch, she can longer be her child s safety net This isn t the sort of novel that makes you weep with the obvious moments, nor is it an attempt to explain suicide Though through the intimacy between mother and son, remembering even the stories he himself wrote where the boy characters often died hints that maybe he was sad for a long time, and she didn t see Or maybe not, maybe that s what we do in the aftermath, look for reason where maybe there is none Maybe fiction is just sometimes fiction The Nikolai she gives life through writing is as witty and biting in her creative story as he was in life She utilizes her gift of authorship which her son himself showed promise of early on to attempt to soothe herself and carry on in this abyss she never asked for.Yes, Nikolai took his own life but it is as much about motherhood because even when it is taken from you in such a way, you are still a mother How should one find meaning in their child s death, in this backwards way to travel in time, when a child should never go first, especially through their own hand With the novels closure, I want to ask only who are you today, instead of how are you Publication Date February 5, 2019Random House flag 3 likesLike see review Jan 15, 2019 Richard Cho rated it really liked it Where would reasons end The Chilean writer Roberto Bola o once said in an interview I don t think reason has anything to do with parent children relationships, not at all Perhaps from the perspective of a child, reason does impose itself, but from the perspective of a parent, it s very difficult to impose reason Is parenthood a precursor to the end of reason Yiyun Li s third novel, Where Reasons End, is entirely composed of a dialogue between a mother and her dead son, interspersed sporadi Where would reasons end The Chilean writer Roberto Bola o once said in an interview I don t think reason has anything to do with parent children relationships, not at all Perhaps from the perspective of a child, reason does impose itself, but from the perspective of a parent, it s very difficult to impose reason Is parenthood a precursor to the end of reason Yiyun Li s third novel, Where Reasons End, is entirely composed of a dialogue between a mother and her dead son, interspersed sporadically by the mother s pithy philosophical musings on language, love, and life, all of which, according to our protagonist, would eventually disappoint us in the end In this world, we don t abide by the rules that bind a child and a parent, the mother says in the book The son had committed suicide a several months before he was only 16 Precocious as he was having read Les Mis rable three times, played oboe in a musical ensemble, and also wrote poetry , he minded that he could not perfect himself in an imperfect life The mother s grief is insurmountable The narrative here is the mother s delusion, one she creates and forces herself to indulge in She creates a world freed from space, time, and even temperature It was a world made up by words, and words only, she observes After her son is gone, words are all she has to deal with her grief This formal ingenuity introduces the untrodden path by which a novel can portray the world Novels or just any books without pictures indeed create a world made seen and felt only with words on pages Nevertheless, the words describe looks, landscapes, and other tangibles in order to affect verisimilitude Li s new novel blatantly disobeys this convention and depicts, in the most literal sense, a world made up only of words and devoid of everything else timeless, spaceless, thingless.The novel is also an autofiction, the genre of which W.G Sebald was the indisputable master and has been recently popularized by the British writer Rachel Cusk This fact, that Li is recounting her own experience behind the slippery label fiction, endows the book with immediacy and intimacy of unbearable sorrow The most devastating moment surfaces when the mother is waylaid by the truth that she is speaking for both herself and her son The world she creates through the imagined conversation is a place of exile from the paralysis her life has become.Their dialogue showcases the interesting dynamics between a parent and a child Knowing that no mother can win over her own child, she anticipates the reprimand her son might have dealt her had he lived in regards to what she thinks or says More than anyone else, she knows the limits of language in a situation like hers, but she forges on, to keep this brave new world going She often wonders how long her conversation can last These imaginations made it easier for me to feel sad, to weep even, but the tears were a veneer over the unspeakable The novel probes into the glaring shortcomings of language as the disconsolate mother struggles to find solace using words to understand her situation.As a writer who claims she has denounced her mother tongue in order to think and write in English, Li s focus on language is like that of a surgeon tending to a surgery with a scalpel She chooses words most consciously every uncommon vocabulary is contested and weighed She often refers to the etymology of the words in order to justify her choice, challenging herself to use only the most fitting nouns and, if called for, most appropriate adjectives The novel reproduces a number of poems in their entirety Wallace Stevens s This Solitude of Cataracts, a translated Chinese poem, as well as a stanza from Philip Larkin The epigram recites Elizabeth Bishop s poem, Argument, from which the book derives its title Poetry is where the use of language is fiercely scrutinized, and by presenting these poems fully on the page, Li directs attention to the workings of language The novel is full of such intertextual references, including her own work, the debut short story collection, Thousand Years of Good Prayers.Li s renown first came from her short stories She has published two story collections, two novels, and a non fiction, of which one of its main themes is suicide Li s own suicide attempts Her previous two novels The Vagrants and Kinder than Solitude had a traditional trajectory that charts from beginning to end with a verifiable plot, characterization, and denouement In comparison, Where Reasons End is formally daring and original, marking a pivotal departure from Li s previous fiction As with an autofiction where fiction and factuality unite and the demarcation eventually dissolves it is her prose itself that garners the attention The new novel, however, is not immune from the pitfalls of an experimental and unconventional approach.Some dialogues are too steeped in abstraction, losing their footing on what they aim to reify Certain moments verge on histrionic as when Li uses the word forever when she speaks, and her son chides her, reminding her that she has forfeited the word in her dictionary a long time ago in order to become a better writer, to which she replies You put it back for me In addition, her incessant self assessment of diction and torrents of etymologic investigation may hinder the readers total immersion However, this might be Li s intended irony these seeming shortcomings reflect most faithfully the mother s state of mind This novel could only be muddled because as an autofiction, the novel is constructed by a writer who claims herself to have become muddleheaded after her son s death Although no particular scene sticks after the last page is turned, the readers will be rewarded with a deep emotion Some may notice a hint of affectation in all its linguistic technicality However, in an era when many novels are overtly self conscious about current political affairs, it is refreshing to see a deeply private novel, one that invites its readers into a world of its own, purely created by a mother s grief and her implacable words.Li s new novel is a synoptically minimized work that progresses in the guise of a language play between the living and the dead The mother creates the conversation to recover something irremediably lost Death annuls time, not life, she wishes to believe Her son will forever remain 16, but if indeed death does not annul life, then in the world she has created with words where time does not exist, her encounter with her son just might be possible Although she is keenly aware of the limits of language, her ultimate hope is manifested in this line Words fall short, yes, but sometimes their shadows can reach the unspeakable Li is defying death by reviving her dead son in the world she created solely by words Defying death with words isn t this the ultimate purpose of writing flag 1 likeLike see review Dec 19, 2018 Jessie added it I am struggling with understanding the description of the book from this publisher and can not determine whether or not the author wrote this following the death of her own son, as that s what the description implies Is that is the case, wherereasonsend by yiyunli is a book that I think perhaps should not have been written Composed in the early months following the suicide of her sixteen year old son, this book tells about a fictional meeting between an author and her deceased son While I t I am struggling with understanding the description of the book from this publisher and can not determine whether or not the author wrote this following the death of her own son, as that s what the description implies Is that is the case, wherereasonsend by yiyunli is a book that I think perhaps should not have been written Composed in the early months following the suicide of her sixteen year old son, this book tells about a fictional meeting between an author and her deceased son While I think this book is supposed to represent a reflection on loss, I would describe it as an artless grief, for no reason other than it was written too soon, from too raw a place I took a class with an instructor once who had lost her son that year and she was too unravelled by her loss to share her craft, it was a grief to watch her struggle in her art in front of an audience That was this book for me The two meet in this book in a non world that is sightless and soundless and affectless and communicate by thoughts to one another Li or the author in the book is too weighted by her own fear to ask her son the questions she wants to and so instead they have short terse discussions that dance around the issues Perhaps the most painful part of this book is the persnickety, terse, and derisive way she imagines her son talking to her It so clearly reflects her own guilt about his death and her feelings of inadequacy as a mother But what is even tragic I think, is that it describes a cold and critical son, one so unkind and angry, that I can t imagine that as she continues on her journey of loss, the author will want to see this rendition of him captured on the page If this is not the case, then I feel that the description of the book is quite confusing, and the book itself, written from a convincing fog, is one that I didn t take much from in reading it Thank you to netgalley for the ARC, opinions are my own flag 2 likesLike see review Jan 16, 2019 Susan rated it it was amazing This beautifully written novel examines the effects of suicide on those left behind Written as a conversation between a mother and her dead 16 year old son, the mother reveals she herself was like him and this has enabled her to create a world where she can still talk to him What the following conversation reveals is that the reasons for suicide can never be known to those left behind and that the consequences of that loss are a never ending grief that no words can describe This novel will ha This beautifully written novel examines the effects of suicide on those left behind Written as a conversation between a mother and her dead 16 year old son, the mother reveals she herself was like him and this has enabled her to create a world where she can still talk to him What the following conversation reveals is that the reasons for suicide can never be known to those left behind and that the consequences of that loss are a never ending grief that no words can describe This novel will haunt you long after you re done and, while devastating in its effects, is still a tender meditation on loss and grief This book was received as part of a giveaway flag 1 likeLike see review Jan 14, 2019 Cathrine rated it it was amazing Shelves 2019 It is such a beautiful and painful read I had to restart 2 times before I had the courage to dive into her sea of sorrow It felt so personal, though it has not been my story until now.Highly reccomend It is such a beautiful and painful read I had to restart 2 times before I had the courage to dive into her sea of sorrow It felt so personal, though it has not been my story until now Highly reccomend flag 1 likeLike see review Nov 01, 2018 Teresa Stenlund rated it it was amazing Wow A mother and a son having a conversation Here s the twist, her son is dead He committed suicide at 16 I wouldn t say that s a spoiler, it s not like the 6th sense when you discover Bruce Willis was dead this whole time It is the premise of the story I suppose A mother simply trying to understand why I enjoyed their banter and bickering back and forth about the ways to say things I felt it was a book about words, and I loved that flag 1 likeLike see review Nov 18, 2018 Caleb Masters rated it liked it In this brief philosophical novel, a mother carries on a dialogue with her sixteen year old son who has recently committed suicide Li explores grief and the limits of our language to accurately describe what the experience of losing a child is like At turns heartbreaking and uplifting, WHERE REASONS END plumbs the depths of grief and leaves the reader with a lot to ponder as they think about the way they process loss in their own lives flag 1 likeLike see review Nov 18, 2018 Alan rated it it was amazing Here is where you are, not where I am I am in fiction, he said I am fiction now A grieving mother, a writer, tries to come to terms with the suicide of her 16 year old son Nikolai by creating imagined conversations as she carries on her day to day life, driving in her car or sitting staring out the window As a writer words are what she knows, and this is a very literary work, its fondness for meanings and etymologies and the fluidity of language shine through with every sentence As the con Here is where you are, not where I am I am in fiction, he said I am fiction now A grieving mother, a writer, tries to come to terms with the suicide of her 16 year old son Nikolai by creating imagined conversations as she carries on her day to day life, driving in her car or sitting staring out the window As a writer words are what she knows, and this is a very literary work, its fondness for meanings and etymologies and the fluidity of language shine through with every sentence As the conversations develop the novel becomes a way of trying to hold on to memories, rather than trying to understand the reasons behind the death Her son is now in aftertime , freed from the life with which he struggled, but he has left his family and friends in a state of stunned grief There are flashes of wit as mother and son talk, argue, and disagree It is a book about how we struggle to come to terms with loss, about how we try to find a way forward, and above all it is about the absence, the pain of losing a child Along with the conversations we learn of the reaction of Nikolai s friends and teachers, creating a picture of a seemingly happy and popular boy, which makes his death all the incomprehensible.This is a heart breaking read, short but with raw emotion and beauty than many books It is not an easy read, especially so if you have lost a close relative or friend But you must read this book It is simply astonishing, achingly moving and beautifully crafted Li s language is sometimes poetical, sometimes playful, and often aware of its own limitations to discuss things which are beyond language and words It deserves to be read slowly and savoured, and then set aside carefully It deserves to be re read It is by far the most moving thing I have read for years not in an all out weeping, blubbering way, but just the raw simplicity of the emotion and the silences between the conversations, the spaces between the words, the questions without answers The loss and grief are profound, and the book is desperately beautiful flag Like see review Dec 28, 2018 Naomi rated it liked it Shelves giveaway s, owned, reviewed This book was so strong with the feels Throughout my journey reading this book I felt like the main character and I were both struggling to win the battle against our demons The grief was so real for me My favorite part of the book was by far the amazing symbolism and style of writing But I did have a few problems with this book My biggest issue was how much of a jerk that Nikolai was to his mother There were times that he treated her like crap A part that really bothered me was where th This book was so strong with the feels Throughout my journey reading this book I felt like the main character and I were both struggling to win the battle against our demons The grief was so real for me My favorite part of the book was by far the amazing symbolism and style of writing But I did have a few problems with this book My biggest issue was how much of a jerk that Nikolai was to his mother There were times that he treated her like crap A part that really bothered me was where the main character was talking about when Nikolai was in kindergarten and she boasted a little of her accomplishments and her son was embarrassed because of that The main character says who wants to hear their mother talk about their accomplishments This part almost made me lose it It wouldn t stop bothering me, a mother has every right to tell people about the amazing things she has done as long as it isn t bragging Then she said that a parent shouldn t tell their kids about their past I m sorry that is absolutely wrong Kids need to know about their parents past at least some so that they can decide what kind of future they want for themselves Also it took her over half of the book to name her other son It made me feel like her other son was completely useless and didn t matter I would give this book a much better rating if the main character didn t make me want to slap her repeatedly But other than that this book was enjoyable flag Like see review Nov 03, 2018 Julie rated it it was ok I wanted to like this book, but I just didn t have it in me The majority of it was a rambling mess that I just didn t have the energy to try and sort out There were bits and pieces scattered throughout that started to make sense, but honestly I had basically given up on the book by then, so it really didn t matter Had this book been longer, I probably wouldn t have finished it, but given it s length I plugged through out of principle There was a lot of potential here, and the premise co I wanted to like this book, but I just didn t have it in me The majority of it was a rambling mess that I just didn t have the energy to try and sort out There were bits and pieces scattered throughout that started to make sense, but honestly I had basically given up on the book by then, so it really didn t matter Had this book been longer, I probably wouldn t have finished it, but given it s length I plugged through out of principle There was a lot of potential here, and the premise could have created an amazing book but this just wasn t it I m disappointed in the book maybe there s something here I m just not getting, and if that s the case, I m also disappointed in myself for not being able to grasp what this could have been.Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review flag Like see review Oct 31, 2018 Emi Bevacqua rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves asian american, fiction Brilliantly imagined, witty repartee between a grieving mother and the 16 year old son she has just very suddenly lost Reading this appealed to my predilection for grammar related banter, and my fear of raising teen agers, but I m afraid it failed to consume me as many other tales of loss have Ravel s The Cat, Gilmour s A Perfect Night to Go to China, Kay s To Dance with the White Dog, Quindlen s One True Thing, etc I had hoped that the references to other suicidal teens, the mom s being Chin Brilliantly imagined, witty repartee between a grieving mother and the 16 year old son she has just very suddenly lost Reading this appealed to my predilection for grammar related banter, and my fear of raising teen agers, but I m afraid it failed to consume me as many other tales of loss have Ravel s The Cat, Gilmour s A Perfect Night to Go to China, Kay s To Dance with the White Dog, Quindlen s One True Thing, etc I had hoped that the references to other suicidal teens, the mom s being Chinese, and the existence of a younger son absence of a partner would lead to an eventual reveal of some kind, but I found this read as lilting as it was perplexing flag Like see review Nov 24, 2018 Katie Devine rated it really liked it This extended conversation between a mother and the child she has conjured through her writing in the raw immediate grief following the suicide of her son is both heartbreaking and haunting Much of their imagined conversation is philosophical in nature life, time, meaning , some is nostalgic, the rest concrete as they debate constraints of language The narrative momentum waned for me at times, as the mother desperately prolonged the conversation with her written son, but there is no denying t This extended conversation between a mother and the child she has conjured through her writing in the raw immediate grief following the suicide of her son is both heartbreaking and haunting Much of their imagined conversation is philosophical in nature life, time, meaning , some is nostalgic, the rest concrete as they debate constraints of language The narrative momentum waned for me at times, as the mother desperately prolonged the conversation with her written son, but there is no denying this is a powerful book about the mind altering states of grief Early digital copy provided by Net Galley flag Like see review Jan 27, 2019 Laura Gadzik rated it it was amazing What a wise, beautiful book Where Reasons End is a book of imagined conversations between a mother and her teenage son, who has died by suicide This synopsis on its own is likely tragic enough to scare away certain readers, but I d encourage them to pick this book up anyway This book is not so much about the way her child s life ended but about the love and respect mother and son have for each other Even though Nikolai is part of his mother s core, we see how she has allowed him to individua What a wise, beautiful book Where Reasons End is a book of imagined conversations between a mother and her teenage son, who has died by suicide This synopsis on its own is likely tragic enough to scare away certain readers, but I d encourage them to pick this book up anyway This book is not so much about the way her child s life ended but about the love and respect mother and son have for each other Even though Nikolai is part of his mother s core, we see how she has allowed him to individuate We see how they tease, comfort, and learn from each other The writing is very poetic and each word carefully chosen I could tell as I was reading that this would be a book that I could revisit at a different season in life and take different things away from it Thank you to Random House and Netgalley for sharing an e copy of this book with me in exchange for my honest review flag Like see review Jan 24, 2019 Kathleen Gray rated it it was amazing This is the conversation no one wants to have The narrator is talking to her dead son Nikolai Nikolai was a typical snarky, a little obnoxious and intelligent teen until he wasn t Until he committed suicide This doesn t descend into maudlin but it is grief soaked, as it should be I m not sure what the market for this is or how to recommend it because it s a topic that no one wants to broach There are no answers and there s no happy ending but it s a fascinating imagined dialogue Tanks to This is the conversation no one wants to have The narrator is talking to her dead son Nikolai Nikolai was a typical snarky, a little obnoxious and intelligent teen until he wasn t Until he committed suicide This doesn t descend into maudlin but it is grief soaked, as it should be I m not sure what the market for this is or how to recommend it because it s a topic that no one wants to broach There are no answers and there s no happy ending but it s a fascinating imagined dialogue Tanks to Netgalley for the ARC flag Like see review Britt rated it really liked it Feb 01, 2019 Random House Publishing Group rated it it was amazing Nov 16, 2018 Jo rated it did not like it Jan 29, 2019 Nadia Petschek Rawls rated it liked it Feb 01, 2019 emir avcilar rated it liked it Jan 29, 2019 Colin Black rated it really liked it Jan 28, 2019 Arya rated it it was amazing Jan 29, 2019 Amara rated it liked it Dec 06, 2018 Jan 15, 2019 Diana rated it it was ok I was looking forward to deviating from my usual genre of thrillers into something with a little depth Unfortunately, I had a difficult time getting into this book The author s words were powerful, but the storyline was too heavy for me flag Like see review Stephanie rated it really liked it Dec 08, 2018 Nov 18, 2018 Jespionage310 marked it as to read This was a sad but beautiful read This was well written and kept my interest I would recommend to any grieving mother flag Like see review Nov 23, 2018 Sayo rated it liked it Shelves 2018 The narrative of a grieving mothers conversations with her dead son.Coming to terms with his suicide she imagines the things they would talk about after he is gone Beautifully written this book is raw with emotion and flips between her life without him and her memories of life with him Often poetic, this book will make you stop and think, and encourage you to have the seemingly meaningless conversations with the ones you love flag Like see review Anna rated it liked it Dec 15, 2018 previous 1 2 next new topicDiscuss This Book There are no discussion topics on this book yet Be the first to start one Share Recommend It Stats Recent Status Updates Readers Also Enjoyed Books by Yiyun Li More Trivia About Where Reasons End No trivia or quizzes yet Add some now renderRatingGraph 12, 10, 12, 2, 1 if rating_details rating_detailssert top rating_graph Company About us Careers Terms Privacy Help Work with us Authors Advertise Authors ads blog API Connect 2019 , Inc Mobile version

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    • ↠ Where Reasons End || ☆ PDF Download by ☆ Yiyun Li
      469 Yiyun Li
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Where Reasons End || ☆ PDF Download by ☆ Yiyun Li
      Posted by:Yiyun Li
      Published :2018-010-12T12:16:17+00:00

    About "Yiyun Li"

      • Yiyun Li

        Yiyun Li grew up in Beijing, China and moved to the United States in 1996 She received an MFA from Iowa Writers Workshop and an MFA in creative nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa Her stories and essays have been published in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,and elsewhere She has received a Whiting Writers Award and was awarded a Lannan Foundation residency in Marfa, TX Her debut Yiyun Li grew up in Beijing, China and moved to the United States in 1996 She received an MFA from Iowa Writers Workshop and an MFA in creative nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa Her stories and essays have been published in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,and elsewhere She has received a Whiting Writers Award and was awarded a Lannan Foundation residency in Marfa, TX Her debut collection, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, won the Frank O Connor International Short Story Award, PEN Hemingway Award, Guardian First Book Award, and California Book Award for first fiction She was recently selected as one of Granta s 21 Best of Young American Novelists She lives in Oakland, California with her husband and their two sons, and teaches at University of California, Davis


    841 Comments

    1. The unspeakable is a wound that stays open always, always, and forever There is no good language when it comes to the unspeakable, I thought There is no precision, no originality, no perfection In the case of Yiyun Li s novel Where Reasons End, the unspeakable is the suicide of the narrator s 16 year old son, Nikolai a boy the same age as Li s own son was when he took his own life This book, written in the aftermath of that suicide, is a series of imagined discussions between Nikolai a The unspe [...]


    2. This short novel imagines a series of conversations between a grieving mother and her dead son Ostensibly it is about grief and the questions that arise after the sudden loss of a loved one A loved one that should not have died first However, I really didn t find this book all that emotionally moving Some people will describe the mother son interactions as witty, but for me, the son s voice is very snarky In some ways, this tone keeps the book from being maudlin But I will admit to thinkin This [...]


    3. Unspeakably beautiful and indescribably heartbreaking, for reasons obvious and uncannily personal It s been some time since a book left me such a guttural, whimpering wreck.


    4. via my blog Since Nikolai s death I had asked people to send poems They came like birds from different lands, each carrying its own mourning notes I felt the deep sorrow expressed in this novel so much I researched the author I wondered, did she herself lose a son to suicide, only to discover about Yuyin Li s own breakdown Li wrote a memoir Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life while she was struggling with deep depression In Wher via my blog Since Nikolai s death I had asked pe [...]


    5. Where would reasons end The Chilean writer Roberto Bola o once said in an interview I don t think reason has anything to do with parent children relationships, not at all Perhaps from the perspective of a child, reason does impose itself, but from the perspective of a parent, it s very difficult to impose reason Is parenthood a precursor to the end of reason Yiyun Li s third novel, Where Reasons End, is entirely composed of a dialogue between a mother and her dead son, interspersed sporadi Where [...]


    6. I am struggling with understanding the description of the book from this publisher and can not determine whether or not the author wrote this following the death of her own son, as that s what the description implies Is that is the case, wherereasonsend by yiyunli is a book that I think perhaps should not have been written Composed in the early months following the suicide of her sixteen year old son, this book tells about a fictional meeting between an author and her deceased son While I t I am [...]


    7. This beautifully written novel examines the effects of suicide on those left behind Written as a conversation between a mother and her dead 16 year old son, the mother reveals she herself was like him and this has enabled her to create a world where she can still talk to him What the following conversation reveals is that the reasons for suicide can never be known to those left behind and that the consequences of that loss are a never ending grief that no words can describe This novel will ha Th [...]


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