The Memory Illusion: Remembering, Forgetting, and the Science of False Memory

The Memory Illusion: Remembering, Forgetting, and the Science of False Memory

Julia Shaw / May 23, 2019

The Memory Illusion Remembering Forgetting and the Science of False Memory Think you have a good memory Think again Memories are our most cherished possessions We rely on them every day of our lives They make us who we are And yet the truth is they are far from being the acc

  • Title: The Memory Illusion: Remembering, Forgetting, and the Science of False Memory
  • Author: Julia Shaw
  • ISBN:
  • Page: 110
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Think you have a good memory Think again.Memories are our most cherished possessions We rely on them every day of our lives They make us who we are And yet the truth is they are far from being the accurate record of the past we like to think they are True, we can all admit to having suffered occasional memory lapses, such as entering a room and immediately forgetting Think you have a good memory Think again.Memories are our most cherished possessions We rely on them every day of our lives They make us who we are And yet the truth is they are far from being the accurate record of the past we like to think they are True, we can all admit to having suffered occasional memory lapses, such as entering a room and immediately forgetting why, or suddenly being unable to recall the name of someone we ve met dozens of times But what if our minds have the potential for profound errors, that enable the manipulation or even outright fabrication of our memories In The Memory Illusion, forensic psychologist and memory expert Dr Julia Shaw uses the latest research to show the astonishing variety of ways in which our brains can indeed be led astray She shows why we can sometimes misappropriate other people s memories, subsequently believing them to be our own She explains how police officers can imprison an innocent man for life on the basis of many denials and just one confession She demonstrates the way radically false memories can be deliberately implanted, leading people to believe they had tea with Prince Charles, or committed crimes that never happened And she reveals how, in spite of all this, we can improve our memory through simple awareness of its fallibility Fascinating and unnerving in equal measure, The Memory Illusion offers a unique insight into the human brain, challenging you to question how much you can ever truly know about yourself Get A Copy Kindle Store StoresAudibleBarnes NobleWalmart eBooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryAlibrisBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Or buy for Kindle Edition, 304 pages Published June 16th 2016 by Cornerstone Digital first published June 2016 More Details ASIN B019CGXQA8 Edition Language English Other Editions 22 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail edit details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about The Memory Illusion, please sign up

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    Lists with This Book Books for Depressed and Angry Procrastinating Perfectionists 9 books 2 voters More lists with this book Community Reviews Showing 1 30 Rating details Sort Default Filter Feb 21, 2017 Charlene rated it it was amazing Shelves abnormal psych, constructs, decision making I am conflicted about this book It deserves 5 stars because of its excellent investigation into how memory works and the book s ability to convey the finer points to a large audience Writing such an accessible book on an important topic, such as faulty memory, will help make the much needed shift from understanding memory as something that is a bit faulty but is, in general, fairly reliable to understanding memory as a retrospective analysis of an old memory that does not reflect the actual ev I am conflicted about this book It deserves 5 stars because of its excellent investigation into how memory works and the book s ability to convey the finer points to a large audience Writing such an accessible book on an important topic, such as faulty memory, will help make the much needed shift from understanding memory as something that is a bit faulty but is, in general, fairly reliable to understanding memory as a retrospective analysis of an old memory that does not reflect the actual event as much as it reflects what the current you thinks about a completely overhauled representation of a past event.Shaw is really gifted at making this complex subject very relatable to her audience However, as with many authors who are able to simplify the subject about which they are writing, Shaw falls into the trap of trading in accuracy and critical thinking for the sake of simplicity Despite the criticisms listed below, I will be giving this book 5 stars because the nature of the work is so important to humanity if we are going to have an updated and accurate understanding of memory Some examples of the author s poor critical thinking ability are as follows She unquestionably accepts a study on false memories in bees even going so far as to call it a seminal work First of all, it s far too early to call it that Second of all, unless the methods are solid and I think they are far from solid , then the findings mean nothing The study on bees in no way suggested they had false memories Being too much of a cheerleader about this type of study means that many people will question the rest of what is presented in this book What a shame, because much of the rest of the book was phenomenal Another example of sloppy critical thinking was exhibited when Shaw talked about trauma Anyone taking an undergrad class on trauma learns that a key rule in understanding trauma is to parse out those who have suffered different types of traumas e.g shameful rape v natural disaster , different ages when suffering trauma child v adult , different perceptions of the same trauma locus of control attribution style , and the type of social and emotional support received after the trauma that affected the perception of trauma Unless you include these things in your analysis, your analysis is going to be truly terrible Shaw didn t look at these things and thus, her analysis of trauma was truly terrible A third example lies in her relating studies of technology She was so short sighted in regard to this section Anti tech people usually annoy me to the point that I cannot bring myself to give them than 2 or 3 stars This book was a rare exception One study involving tech looked at the impact of screen time on kids ability to learn But learning was defined as how many novel words a child learned There is so much to learning than the acquisition of words Using a smart device teaches the child how to relate to the larger world of disseminated information So, if while learning how to use tech, a child is a bit slower at word acquisition, I would not call that a deficit in learning I would call it a bad research measurement Similarly, when trying to understand attention and distraction e.g cell phone use , it would have been essential to compare hands free calls to controls perhaps someone talking to a passenger who is indeed inside the same car, sitting in the passenger or back seat Such a critical look at the hands free study is never attempted in this book Why didn t she at least try to discuss methods There are great studies on cell phone distraction and attention when driving or doing other tasks Why not include good studies and at least mention the controls so that the reader can have confidence that the author knows how to critically interpret a study Maddening As I said above, even with these flaws, the book will get a full five stars from me because despite her lack of critical understanding in some areas noted above , Shaw actually excels in critical thinking when it comes to the overall process of memory formation and retrieval The vast majority of what she presented in this book is exceptional For example, one particularly great aspect of this book was the following Shaw gave many examples of how one person, who never experienced an event, could come to believe they had actually experienced an event She used Loftus studies as well as her own to make this point, over and over And, it was beautiful The studies included the usual suspects subject was made to believe they experienced something as a child after parents made up fake event, subject was made to believe a car smashed or merely bumped into another car based on the word choice in the retelling of the event, etc Having given the reader a plethora of examples and having also provided the reader with a deep and easy to comprehend understanding of how memory coding and retrieval actually works contrary to how we thought it worked , Shaw tied it all to Solomon Asch s study Solomon Asch conducted one of the most famous studies in the psychology of perception or peer pressure, depending on how you understand the results He showed participants 3 lines one short, one medium length, and one long He had fake participants in the study who tried to mind fuck the real participants by telling them to misbelieve what they saw with their own eyes The confederate participants confidently declared that the short line was longer than the medium line Nothing could be simple than identifying short, medium, and long length lines And yet, the vast majority of the real participants agreed with the confederates that the shorter lines were longer than the obviously longer lines What could make them do such an absurd thing There has been a debate about this for a long time Some suggested they caved to peer pressure they lied and said the line was longer so they would fit in and not be embarrassed Some say they actually change their perception and genuinely saw the line as longer, once everyone else said it was longer thus showing that seeing is not always a simple biological process but can indeed depend on what others see Professors, researchers, and authors alike have tried to make a case of either I have enjoyed almost all explanations, no matter what side they tried to prove I have to say that Shaw s discussion of Asch s lines and memory is possibly the best discussion I have ever read That alone made the book 5 stars and made up for any other sloppy analysis If you take some of the studies and her annoying anti tech stance with a grain of salt, this book is fantastic and absolutely worth reading flag 25 likesLike see review View all 5 comments May 21, 2017 Misericordia The Serendipity Aegis rated it it was amazing Q 150 , Q 150 c flag 8 likesLike see review Jun 03, 2017 Richard Newton rated it really liked it Shelves self help personal development, popular science Generally a good and accessible read covering a wide range of science related to memory Good if you like your scientists to quote plenty of research and remain accessible Debunks all sorts of myths about memories including things like repressed memories The topic is an important one, and one that of us could do with understanding Pleasantly well written, although the best parts are the beginning and the end I found some of the chapters in the middle a little dull The basic message i Generally a good and accessible read covering a wide range of science related to memory Good if you like your scientists to quote plenty of research and remain accessible Debunks all sorts of myths about memories including things like repressed memories The topic is an important one, and one that of us could do with understanding Pleasantly well written, although the best parts are the beginning and the end I found some of the chapters in the middle a little dull The basic message is that your memory is much fallible than you probably realise It does leave one feeling quite a lot less confident about what you think you know, but if that s reality its best that we all know it flag 6 likesLike see review Dec 23, 2016 David rated it liked it I finished the book without developing any real affection for it On the upside, there were plenty of examples and case studies which unusually for a book of this type were not rooted entirely in studies and statistics from the USA.On the downside, I felt that interesting points were raised, and then case studies and discussions were engaged to add to the point that or less failed to add any real value.Did it enhance my understanding of memory A bit But I think my actual take away learn I finished the book without developing any real affection for it On the upside, there were plenty of examples and case studies which unusually for a book of this type were not rooted entirely in studies and statistics from the USA.On the downside, I felt that interesting points were raised, and then case studies and discussions were engaged to add to the point that or less failed to add any real value.Did it enhance my understanding of memory A bit But I think my actual take away learning from the book could have been condensed into a book half the size flag 6 likesLike see review Dec 03, 2016 Amirography rated it it was amazing Shelves philosophy, cognitive science A lovely book Filled with scientific citations, anecdotes and provoking information It was an easy read, than again, it was also a very insightful book Though I was hoping for a specific content, this book didn t disappoint as far as I m concerned It touched subjects such as cognitive biases, working memory, long term memory, biology, psychology, criminology, identity and mnemonics It offered scientific facts and also ethical applications, and some applications I would strongly sugges A lovely book Filled with scientific citations, anecdotes and provoking information It was an easy read, than again, it was also a very insightful book Though I was hoping for a specific content, this book didn t disappoint as far as I m concerned It touched subjects such as cognitive biases, working memory, long term memory, biology, psychology, criminology, identity and mnemonics It offered scientific facts and also ethical applications, and some applications I would strongly suggest it to anyone interested flag 6 likesLike see review Dec 11, 2018 Carrie Poppy rated it it was amazing review of another edition Wonderful flag 5 likesLike see review Jun 01, 2017 Adam Morva rated it it was amazing Shelves to read again research, favorites WOW So, prior to starting this book I was fairly well read and educated in the topic, but I have to say I found this book quite useful and impressive nonetheless.It is accessible to the layman with no prior knowledge in the topic, but as I said, even advanced students will find their fill of fun.Julia Shaw talks about everything in just the right detail, with just the right amount of evidence to support her points, in just the right language.Don t be mislead by the title Yes, the emphasis is on WOW So, prior to starting this book I was fairly well read and educated in the topic, but I have to say I found this book quite useful and impressive nonetheless.It is accessible to the layman with no prior knowledge in the topic, but as I said, even advanced students will find their fill of fun.Julia Shaw talks about everything in just the right detail, with just the right amount of evidence to support her points, in just the right language.Don t be mislead by the title Yes, the emphasis is on false memories , but the reader will get a very good idea about how memory works In fact, the author also discusses what all this means for law, eyewitness testimony, studying, or your life.For example Did you know that if, let s say, you were eating a muffin when you made a memory e.g studying , you will have a better chance of recalling it if you eat a muffin recreate parts of the environment Or, let s say you are studying Did you know that reading the text over and over again is less efficient than reading it and recalling it afterwards Did you know that verbalizing non verbal memories has a detrimental effect on the accuracy reaction time performance in non verbal memory tasks Or that task switching multitasking makes it harder to remember things, and also makes one stressed and error prone There s also some debunking of popular misconceptions.But back to the topic of False Memories Most people, I think, would vehemently insist that they have no, or virtually no false memories They almost certainly never heard of the concept A bit smarter people will argue that it surely is an exotic thing that doesn t really happen to people, and barely affects their lives WRONG For example, in their study Julia Shaw and colleagues managed to convince than 70% of the subjects that they committed crimes something happened to them that did not In other words, implanting false memories on purpose, and even by ACCIDENT is really easy and happens all the time Here s the gist of the study if you are interested So wow I think this book should be required reading for everyone If you are a kindred spirit, and like to know what exactly you are getting into, here are some and not all of the concepts being discussed Semantic Memory Confabulation Source Confusion Spilling the Punchbowl Experiment Short Term Memory Phonological Loop Working Memory Chunking Childhood Amnesia Memory Malleability Pruning Neuron Synapse Synapsogenesis Synaptic Pruning Optimal Minimal Value Deletion Metamemory Arousal Chronostesia Perspective Memory Memory Landmark Forward Telescoping, Backward Telescoping Reminiscence Bump Memory Fragmentation Angrum Fuzzy Trace Theory Memory Trace Gist Trace Verbatim Trace Verbatim Memory Gist Memory Error Proneness Hyperthamisia Eidetic Memory HSAM Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory Spreading Activation Model Savants Directed Forgetting Task Attentional Gaze Change Blindness Change Blindness Blindness Sleep Glutamate Regulation Priming Hypnosis Survivorship Bias Superiority Illusion Superrecognizer Own Race Bias Contact Hypothesis Own Age Bias Flashbulb Memory Recollection Rejection Verbal Overshadowing Leading Questioning Multitasking vs Task switching Memory Borrowing Social Contagion of Memory Source Confusion Memory Conformity Groupiness Entitativity Transactive Memory Digital Amnesia Error Pruning Retrieval Practice Retrieval Induced Forgetting Effect Suggestive Interrogation n back Training Mnemonics Memory palace flag 3 likesLike see review Apr 15, 2017 Passenger B rated it did not like it Shelves kill it with fire, psychology nonfiction, neuroscience I ve never read so many false statements in a row, presented in a conceited, fanatical way at that Science I think not The book is all over the place which made it hard to understand what the point of some of the chapters or individual examples and stories were Author was adamant that no one can remember early childhood memories or have memories from when they were a baby, then later basically negated that statement without seemingly even being aware of it The she wrote the often I ve never read so many false statements in a row, presented in a conceited, fanatical way at that Science I think not The book is all over the place which made it hard to understand what the point of some of the chapters or individual examples and stories were Author was adamant that no one can remember early childhood memories or have memories from when they were a baby, then later basically negated that statement without seemingly even being aware of it The she wrote the often words such as generally , not always etc crept in Oh yeah, and apparently lobotomies were probably helpful to people who were forced into becoming a zombie by the pseudo science called psychiatry, whose history is filled with force, emotional and mental rape, murder, aggravated assault basically and other insanities It s the playground of antisocial personalitiesbut alright Let s not get into that In any case, with this statement the author revealed herself for what she is clueless and dangerously so I read the rest of the book although I got discouraged early on I could tear apart almost every single chapter of this shit, but this is the first time in my life that I feel it would be a waste of energy I have wasted enough time on this ridiculous book, period I pity the fools who take this for actual science flag 3 likesLike see review Feb 26, 2017 Elsa K rated it really liked it This book was utterly fascinating It was also a very engaging read I was impressed how it was so gripping, even though it was mostly explaining science and psychological studies I would recommend it to anyone.I found parts of it difficult to swallow I want to hold onto my memories as fact Also how this relates to criminology is difficult to think about But I still think it was good to think through and to be aware of The author s purpose seems to be to educate the public on this and to ge This book was utterly fascinating It was also a very engaging read I was impressed how it was so gripping, even though it was mostly explaining science and psychological studies I would recommend it to anyone.I found parts of it difficult to swallow I want to hold onto my memories as fact Also how this relates to criminology is difficult to think about But I still think it was good to think through and to be aware of The author s purpose seems to be to educate the public on this and to get the word out there She does a great and entertaining job accomplishing that.Also, the chapter on technology and how it effects our memory seriously has me considering getting off facebook not like I use it much these days anyways , not using the internet on my smart phone and definitely not driving while talking on the phone It seems like many of these technological advances do come at a price to our memories And memories are something I hold of value than facebook flag 2 likesLike see review Feb 19, 2017 Phill rated it it was amazing review of another edition I found The Memory Illusion to be an enjoyable as well as a humbling read It was a sobering revelation coming to terms with the fact that our memories are undeniably flawed and subject to being hacked What I enjoyed most about the book is that it s all based on science and research with a full bibliography Dr Shaw explains in full and entertainingly I might add detail what false memories are and how they impact our lives and society After finishing this book I wanted to buy a copy for I found The Memory Illusion to be an enjoyable as well as a humbling read It was a sobering revelation coming to terms with the fact that our memories are undeniably flawed and subject to being hacked What I enjoyed most about the book is that it s all based on science and research with a full bibliography Dr Shaw explains in full and entertainingly I might add detail what false memories are and how they impact our lives and society After finishing this book I wanted to buy a copy for everyone I knew, it s really that informative I was particularly enthralled by all the studies on memory and the biology of the brain dendrites, synapses, memory blocking proteins so fckn cool I am also a relatively slow reader yet I finished the book within a week I strongly recommend this book to everyone and even so to those in positions of power responsibility e.g parents, teachers, etc Also, Never Eat Soggy Weiners flag 2 likesLike see review Jan 08, 2017 Suncerae rated it liked it Our collections of memories make us who we are They are the basis for self identity, the sum of all of our life experiences It is normal to occasionally forget someone s name or why you went into the kitchen, but it is also just as normal to re write entire memories, minutes or years after the original occurrence Dr Julia Shaw, memory expert and forensic psychologist, actually creates false memories in healthy unsuspecting college students Using current research, she shows just how often ou Our collections of memories make us who we are They are the basis for self identity, the sum of all of our life experiences It is normal to occasionally forget someone s name or why you went into the kitchen, but it is also just as normal to re write entire memories, minutes or years after the original occurrence Dr Julia Shaw, memory expert and forensic psychologist, actually creates false memories in healthy unsuspecting college students Using current research, she shows just how often our memories are led astray from the truth.The Memory Illusion uses broad strokes to touch on the social science of current memory research alongside anecdotes of human studies or criminal court cases You are likely to find at least a few chapters compelling in the hodge podge of topics covered, but it s a bumpy ride While I really like parts of book, much of it is slow and occasionally too basic For example, popular myths that I am surprised are still popular are debunked, including stories about memory geniuses and sinister memory alteration through inception, hypnosis, and the unconscious.I find the specifics of the social studies most interesting, as they are the strongest evidence of just how easy it is to not only convince an adult they committed a crime as teenager, but that they in fact begin to recall details of the incident in subsequent sessions, eventually appropriating the memory completely Even unnerving are the real world examples of court convictions because of one passionate confession or police officers who ignore facts because they do not fit with an impressionable memory or stereotype.If someone asks you if you can remember something, say no All of our memories are a mix of reality and rational interpretation, with details that change every time you remember that memory But take heart, because even though our brains are highly constantly reworking those memories, they are also constantly learning Plus, you get to live in a reality you can write.Recommended as a pop culture memory nonfiction for anyone who prides themselves on their memory readwellreviews flag 2 likesLike see review Dec 12, 2016 Antonia rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves read in 2016, audio audible It s a little scary to think of how much of our past is probably fictional especially since our sense of self very much depends on our memories It s equally scary to think about what or who we d be without them This book draws together many different lines of memory research, including studies of false memories, cognitive biases, flashbulb memories It s amazing how prone to errors, both small and large, our memories are And it s sobering to consider the implications for eyewitness testimon It s a little scary to think of how much of our past is probably fictional especially since our sense of self very much depends on our memories It s equally scary to think about what or who we d be without them This book draws together many different lines of memory research, including studies of false memories, cognitive biases, flashbulb memories It s amazing how prone to errors, both small and large, our memories are And it s sobering to consider the implications for eyewitness testimony and the criminal justice system Shaw is not only a memory researcher herself, but also a criminal psychologist In this book, she draws on psychology, neuroscience, and criminology to illustrate the many different kinds of memory errors we can and do make all the time and why it s natural to do so The book does lead us to question our own histories and raises some fascinating questions about our constructions of reality It can also make us tolerant of others memory mistakes and a little less likely to insist, when we disagree with someone else s recollection of events, that our own version is the true one I listened to the audiobook and the narrator, Siri Steinmo, was just wonderful I usually prefer books read by the author for they are much likely to sound like someone talking to me than someone reading to me But this one is an exception I noted a few mispronounced words, but they re not frequent enough to worry over A fascinating read or listen flag 2 likesLike see review Dec 21, 2016 Stephen Yu added it review of another edition I could tell that the Julia Shaw made an effort to avoid too many medical jargon Trying her best to make sure that the content of the book wasn t too dry, at times having intriguing anecdotes.Filled with many references to countless experiments and research conducted by various other doctors professors, Julia Shaw gives insightful explanations to certain memory illusions of human beings such as Why we tend to be overconfident with our capabilities of memory retention How can other people s I could tell that the Julia Shaw made an effort to avoid too many medical jargon Trying her best to make sure that the content of the book wasn t too dry, at times having intriguing anecdotes.Filled with many references to countless experiments and research conducted by various other doctors professors, Julia Shaw gives insightful explanations to certain memory illusions of human beings such as Why we tend to be overconfident with our capabilities of memory retention How can other people s memories affect your own However, being of a visual learner I think it would have been enjoyable if the the research experiments conducted had photos of the subjects, or even just simple illustrations It s just a small gripe although I did enjoy and learn a lot from this book flag 2 likesLike see review Apr 10, 2018 Adam Osth rated it liked it I m biased because I study memory for a living With that being said, I was surprised at how much I learned while reading this book, especially during the neuroscience chapter, which talked about some really interesting recent developments in optogenetics.On the other hand, the book didn t seem to have much of a coherent thesis It talked about various ways that people have false memories but didn t really talk about theories that actually explain these phenomena Speaking as a cognitive scienti I m biased because I study memory for a living With that being said, I was surprised at how much I learned while reading this book, especially during the neuroscience chapter, which talked about some really interesting recent developments in optogenetics.On the other hand, the book didn t seem to have much of a coherent thesis It talked about various ways that people have false memories but didn t really talk about theories that actually explain these phenomena Speaking as a cognitive scientist, many of these phenomena are readily explained by current models of memory and understanding the theoretical basis can make these phenomena much less mysterious flag 2 likesLike see review Feb 18, 2018 Esther rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves own a copy, psychology Interesting and fascinating, very informative and opinion changing However, for me, one point was being discarded too much, and that is how childhood memories which we might not remember actively neither be able to recover, I agree on that point could still influence our adult life cue attachment theory.Apart from that, I enjoyed that the writer clearly expressed her opinion based on her research, while still also explaining theories that exist but to which she does not adhere Refreshing Interesting and fascinating, very informative and opinion changing However, for me, one point was being discarded too much, and that is how childhood memories which we might not remember actively neither be able to recover, I agree on that point could still influence our adult life cue attachment theory.Apart from that, I enjoyed that the writer clearly expressed her opinion based on her research, while still also explaining theories that exist but to which she does not adhere Refreshing openness.I certainly understand now even than before, that memories can lead astray, that false memories are possible and can even be created on purpose I have also understood to cherish the way my brain is working, with its faults and traps, while being aware not to trust it too much, especially when I feel absolutely sure about something If I have done my job, your memory should now seem hopelessly fragile, impossibly inaccurate To bring you to an acceptance that all of us have critically flawed memories is the very reason I wrote this book flag 1 likeLike see review Jan 05, 2019 Simone Beg rated it it was amazing Shelves non fiction I kind of expected the reviews for this to be a mixed bag with a topic that is so emotional to many people After all most people strongly believe their memories to be facts and that their memories are what makes up a large chunk of their personalities To put the accuracy of memories in general into question is bound to stir up some heated emotions.Personally I fall somewhere in the middle Could the author convince me in every single aspect of her reasoning Nope But do I feel I learned a lot I kind of expected the reviews for this to be a mixed bag with a topic that is so emotional to many people After all most people strongly believe their memories to be facts and that their memories are what makes up a large chunk of their personalities To put the accuracy of memories in general into question is bound to stir up some heated emotions.Personally I fall somewhere in the middle Could the author convince me in every single aspect of her reasoning Nope But do I feel I learned a lot of things and gained quite some insight into recent research that I didn t have before Absolutely.People need to remember that this is not the end of all discussion about memory research It is an argument put forward with often very strong supportive scientific findings, but you can be sure as research progresses you will see dozens of equally well supported counter arguments or otherwise differing views.Again, can a layman learn a lot from this book, yes Do you have to take it as written in stone facts that have no chance of getting reconsidered when presented with new evidence, no.So for what it is, I m giving it 5 stars You can easily finish it in 2 3 days It s a worthwhile and quite entertaining read or at least that s how I remember it flag 1 likeLike see review Jan 23, 2018 Michael rated it it was amazing Amazing and terrifying Julia Shaw successfully destroys our confidence in our memories There is so much poignant and practical information in here, especially for anyone in sociology or criminology fields, or just anyone who interacts with humans If you think you have a good memory, or that people who make up stories must be lying, or you think that eye witness accounts are the most reliable form of evidence, this book will change your perspective Fortunately I never had a great memory a Amazing and terrifying Julia Shaw successfully destroys our confidence in our memories There is so much poignant and practical information in here, especially for anyone in sociology or criminology fields, or just anyone who interacts with humans If you think you have a good memory, or that people who make up stories must be lying, or you think that eye witness accounts are the most reliable form of evidence, this book will change your perspective Fortunately I never had a great memory anyway.My only gripe is that some of the studies cited seemed less than comprehensive or conclusive, but the overall message of the book was clearly supported by her supporting research flag 1 likeLike see review Dec 21, 2017 Camio.Dontchaknow rated it liked it Interesting Funnily enough I don t remember much but happy to go through it again flag 1 likeLike see review Dec 15, 2017 Sherrymoon marked it as to read review of another edition flag 1 likeLike see review Jul 03, 2018 Kirstin rated it really liked it So interesting and left me questioning what was real in my life flag 1 likeLike see review Apr 10, 2017 Elisa rated it liked it review of another edition Some parts were interesting, but I didn t like the Audible narrator I found her reading flat The contents didn t completely make up for it flag 1 likeLike see review Jun 13, 2018 Bernie Gourley rated it really liked it Recommends it for those interested in false memories and the implanting thereof Julia Shaw is a psychologist who conducted research into whether and how false memories could be planted in a person s mind and not just any memories, but memories of having committed a crime that one actually didn t That research is fascinating, and I think it s tremendously valuable given the disparity between how accurate people believe their memories are and how fallible they are in practice This disparity has played a major role in many a miscarriage of justice with eye witnesses hi Julia Shaw is a psychologist who conducted research into whether and how false memories could be planted in a person s mind and not just any memories, but memories of having committed a crime that one actually didn t That research is fascinating, and I think it s tremendously valuable given the disparity between how accurate people believe their memories are and how fallible they are in practice This disparity has played a major role in many a miscarriage of justice with eye witnesses historically being considered the gold standard of evidence in criminal trials Of course, I m also a bit uneasy about people learning the recipe for an optimal process of generating false memories as it has the taint of being MK Ultra level nefarious Though it should be pointed out that subjects must be active if unwitting participants in creating these false memories, so planting memories is an oversimplification This book discusses Shaw s research, but it s of an overview of science s understanding of the limits of memory and how those limits conflict with our beliefs at least about one s own memory we often recognize how fallible other people s memories are The book consists of ten chapters Chapter one dives into to one of the most common occurrences of false memory, and that s the claim by some people that they remember events from their infancy if not their own birth Shaw presents the evidence for why such memories aren t possible This sets up the whole subject nicely because one must ask how so many people can claim to remember events that are physiologically impossible for them to have remembered, and to frequently be right about most key details No one is suggesting that such people are liars not all or even most of them, anyway Imagine a school age child hearing a story about his or her life as a baby Hearing said story triggers a visualization in this child s mind, and that visualization might well be filed away in memory, but when that memory is recalled the person in question may not realize she is recalling her imagined image of a story and not the actual event itself Herein lies the crux of false memory 1 anything one visualizes in detail might potentially be stored away and become undifferentiated from the experiencing of an event 2 when we recall a memory we are recalling the last time we remembered it and not the event directly, and this can lead to a disparity between the memory and the actual event as it gets tied up with what s going on in one s mind at the time Chapter two explores perception, and how flawed perceptions may become flawed or tarnished memories Just as memory isn t the direct recording of events that we often feel it is, perception isn t a direct replication of the world but rather a model generated in the brain Therefore, the limitations and inaccuracies of the mental model are the first line of deviation of memory from reality Chapter three describes how the brain s physiology and evolutionary biology produce limitations to our ability to remember limitations in spite of which we could thrive in the world in which we evolved Chapter four begins a series of chapters that take on specific objections that will arise to the ideas about false memory presented in the early chapters This chapter counters an anticipated objection about people who seem to have perfect memories In other words, a reader might admit that most people s memories are crap and even that his own memory isn t infallible, but what about the people with Las Vegas stage shows or the Asperger savant who knows every phone number in the Manhattan White Pages Surely, these rare cases disprove the general idea of how memory works Shaw shows that none of these people have perfect memory Some have spectacular autobiographical memory memory for their own life events and others are exceedingly skilled at using mnemonic devices to remember any facts, but they all have limits There s also a discussion of how an unusually perfect autobiographical memory is often of a curse than a blessing We forget for good reason Chapter five examines another common memory fallacy, which is that one can remember best by getting the middleman of the consciousness mind out of the way and feeding data directly into the subconscious In other words, it takes on subliminal learning You may be familiar with the idea from ads suggesting that you can learn French in a couple weeks without cracking a book just by playing audio tracks in one s sleep and letting oneself learn effortlessly Like every program that promises growth without effort, this one is debunked Studies suggest that if one sleeps during such nights, one won t learn, and if one learns, one isn t actually sleeping In other words, learning requires one s attention I will say, the book fell off the rails for me a bit during this chapter As I wrote in a recent blog post about psychological concepts that even psychologists repeatedly get wrong, Shaw denies the existence of hypnotic trance state as an altered state of consciousness However, it becomes clear she isn t arguing against the scientific perspective of what hypnosis is a physically relaxed but highly mentally attentive state and is rather denying the misconceived popular notion that seems to involve a person possibly wearing a glittery cape taking control of another person s mind and making them into a zombified drone She writes in an odd, round about fashion on this subject as well as the topic of brainwashing for which she offers her own value laden definition I m not so sure that she didn t understand hypnosis as much as she wanted to make sure her work was thoroughly distanced from hypnosis and brainwashing It seems just seems strange and a bit dubious that a scholar studying false memory wouldn t be thoroughly familiar with the literature on suggestibility and the states of mind most associated with it, i.e hypnosis I can only imagine the hoops she had to go through to get her research design through an IRB IRB s are review boards that make determinations about whether a research project is among other things ethically defensible After a series of famous and ethically questionable studies by the likes of Stanley Milgrim, Ewen Cameron, and Timothy Leary, to name a few, psychology has come under great scrutiny Chapter six asks why we believe our memories are so awesome despite all evidence to the contrary This comes down to why most of us unjustifiably judge ourselves superior in most regards As is true of drivers, almost every person thinks she is better than average in the realm of memory This is important because it s not so much that our memory is fallible that leads to problems but that it s fallible while we think it s perfect Chapter seven challenges the belief that there are certain events that are indelibly etched into our brains such as depending upon age the Kennedy assassination, the Challenger explosion, or 9 11 Such memories were once considered flash bulb memories, perfect renderings of societally traumatic events carved into our synapses However, once these memories started to be put to the test, it was found that the details vis vis where one was and what one was doing at the time are often wrong Chapter eight discusses how media and social media mold memories One element of this is group think One s memories may be molded through manipulation of the fact that people will readily believe that which is consistent with their beliefs while denying that which is inconsistent regardless of facts and evidence This chapter also takes on how social media influences memory as a distraction and because of so called digital amnesia in which people remember less because they figure they can look it up at any time in the vastness of the internet Chapter nine proposes that even one s most traumatic memories aren t necessarily accurate, and in fact might be likely to be fallacious This may be the most important chapter of the book because it shows how a confluence of factors namely, bad questioning tactics and peer societal pressure can result in the inadvertent planting of false memories The chapter focuses on a series of Satanic ritual sexual abuse cases, a number of which were eventually disproved So eager to build a case to bring believed wrong doers to justice, law enforcement officers sometimes inadvertently pressured children into making up stories under the guise of trying to get them to open up, stories that sometimes became false memories.Chapter ten shifts gears to consider what one can do about the issue of faulty memory in other words how one can avoid being manipulated through exploitation of the limitations of one s own memory This is valuable information and not just for legal purposes but for life in general.The book has a few graphics as necessary throughout the book and has end notes to provide sources and elaboration on comments in the text I found this book to be immensely valuable as food for thought The author presents many fascinating stories and the results of intriguing research studies, all in a readable package I d recommend this book for anyone who is interested in the subject of the limits of human memory, how these limits can be manipulated, and how that manipulation can impact the criminal justice process flag Like see review Nov 17, 2016 Hans rated it it was amazing This is a great book to understand memory and how impacts your world I am now comfortable in accepting situations are not as I initial assumed them to be I discovered how important memory is to our identity We place a lot of value on something so fragile I also appreciate that Julia Shaw could make me accept this new reality without worry How many conflicts in my life have included a discrepancy between my memory and the memory of others Since reading this book I now see that my memories a This is a great book to understand memory and how impacts your world I am now comfortable in accepting situations are not as I initial assumed them to be I discovered how important memory is to our identity We place a lot of value on something so fragile I also appreciate that Julia Shaw could make me accept this new reality without worry How many conflicts in my life have included a discrepancy between my memory and the memory of others Since reading this book I now see that my memories are a mix of reality and a rational interpretation to fill in the missing pieces When I face conflict of this manner, I no longer will feel the need to debate the details and instead will focus on finding the resolution.The one negative is interacting with a world where my reality is no longer inline with the majority of the population Hopeful over time people will read and understand the concepts presented here With all the citations I m also worried I ve opened a deep rabbit hole to consume my time flag 1 likeLike see review Dec 25, 2017 Chouba Nabil rated it it was amazing Book the memory illusion Book present nice update on the latest research brain memory research, If our memory is gone who we are Episodic memory is like Facebook wallsShort memory working memory only for 30s can store 7 2 numberLong term memory for longer than 30 sec 3.5 years we start having memories between 2 5 we don t know what is important that should be remember children amnesia Brain size 2 4 week 36%1 years 72%2 years 83%9 years 95%13 years 100% when we start fully re Book the memory illusion Book present nice update on the latest research brain memory research, If our memory is gone who we are Episodic memory is like Facebook wallsShort memory working memory only for 30s can store 7 2 numberLong term memory for longer than 30 sec 3.5 years we start having memories between 2 5 we don t know what is important that should be remember children amnesia Brain size 2 4 week 36%1 years 72%2 years 83%9 years 95%13 years 100% when we start fully remembering 18 20 peak memory rememberers bomb Emergence of the self those memories who made us who we are.First removal neurone 51% only most important stay and connection increase.Next removal of synapses after adolescence pruning optimal minimum deletion 50% watched advertisements in Disney where persons meet Mikey, 50% person meet Bugs BunnyBoth says when they want to Disney when they are young meet Mikey or bugs bunnyBugs Bunny is not Disney figure Prove that watching adverts induce a memoryTelling people story that is part of there memory and asking them to imagine the situationAfter 3 4 time section they start believing that its part of their memory and start giving details of the fake event.Book prove it s easy to hack the brain and add memory Arrosal high harte rate, sweating, delayation of eyes increase memory retention there is sweat point If we are in same state we remember better you learned when drinking Tea and lessening to music, to remember do the same.Time is memory and memory is time we use sequence of past events to feel the time passing.If you are optimistic you are bad remembering how much it took you in the past.We underestimate what other do, but we are optimistic with ours.Biasing Telescoping earlier if it s less than 3 years else it s later if that 3 year 3 year memory are easy accessible Monism all thinking originate from the brain Dualism soul body religion When we remember, we destroy it Like in DRAM need to restore it again in longterm memory A drug can be used to stop the restoring used for depression slow down the badly , slow chimical reaction like alcohol Researchers were able to create false memory using a protein during the muse sleeping dream hippocampus matrix link neurone work by association to remember It s the only place where brain is still generate new neurone when old.Eidetic memory you see and remember the picture in your head 5% children 0% adult non mature memory HESM People who remember all what happened every day 56 in the world They have better search indexing, work like auto biographical memoryThey are stuck in the past all time, sensitive to criticism, sensitive.Forgetting is an important thing to focus, filter , not distracted by stuff not needed.1 10 autisme are savant exceptional memory abnormal big hippocampus memory , worst memory about their life, they remember facts information, the inverse of auto biographical memory Inability to understand other selfs difference.Post stress disorder overly focus on an event, they can t forget.No one have perfect memory its build to forget.Memory is attention, when meeting new guy we focus on lot of information and we miss the name.Attention is filtering non useful thing, being blind Under 2 age TV PHONE iPad Media is bad, they need interact with real world.Hypnoses 3 4 work on people that flow suggestions anyway with or without hypnoses.We think we are better than average, superiority illusion, survivorship bias focus on successes like drop for university like S.Jobs, better see the statistics 2.5% people are face blindness book man who missed his wife for a hate Inverse super recognisers are used for cctv Own race baise culture shape how we look, scan and identify faces.Difficult to recognise others race faces own age baises gender baises We remember faces by consulting our already existing database of facesConfidence in memory don t mean accuracy Verbalisation make things worst, make generation computing with existing memory.Photos create also competing memory.Remember when we access via Verbalisation Photos we need to rewrite and restore the memory.If a tree fall in the forest and nobody hears it does really happen If you have a party and nobody shared in Facebook or tweeter does it really happensMultitasking fb and homework correlated with bad results It overload the brain Thought neurone fire in same time, work in same frequency multitasking is impossible We need switching Alfa wave quite all neurone75% chose a conformity solutions it create strong groupe.if people are running is will save your life to stupidity flow.Knowing that you can access the information imply you will not remember it Digital amnesiaIf we have the information and where to find it brain will save the easy one.Stranger know your face better then you You appearance change and you only knows some pic or few sec on mirrors.Collective memory improve accuracy Recalling is better that studying for memory.Freud got all his speculation form his patient not using scientific results He created fake memories using regelation, trama berried in unconcussion memory.Feeling of knowing is almost true We better remembering something is wired also nomoniks make association helps flag Like see review Feb 19, 2017 Janet Rosenblatt rated it it was amazing CommentJust finished the bookInteresting topic people never think about.The information is somewhat frightening and strongly suggests that no one should ever be alone without someone who can document their activities This is so because if you are ever accused of a crime you cannot rely on a fair and just outcome which could be based on verbal items entered as evidence.SadAlso as a scientist familiar, I have some questions about the citations regarding neural timing that were mentioned in this b CommentJust finished the bookInteresting topic people never think about.The information is somewhat frightening and strongly suggests that no one should ever be alone without someone who can document their activities This is so because if you are ever accused of a crime you cannot rely on a fair and just outcome which could be based on verbal items entered as evidence.SadAlso as a scientist familiar, I have some questions about the citations regarding neural timing that were mentioned in this book LARRY flag Like see review Feb 07, 2017 Andre rated it it was amazing Fantastic overview of the concept of memory, tying in cutting edge empirical data with relevant anecdotes, and what s impactful, is the effect on the judicial system This book was a delightful and very well organized read that can be understood and enjoyed by most adults This is an important note, as I believe that major positive growth in society could occur through the widespread dissemination of these concepts and ideas Caveat this book was completed as an audiobook, where the narrat Fantastic overview of the concept of memory, tying in cutting edge empirical data with relevant anecdotes, and what s impactful, is the effect on the judicial system This book was a delightful and very well organized read that can be understood and enjoyed by most adults This is an important note, as I believe that major positive growth in society could occur through the widespread dissemination of these concepts and ideas Caveat this book was completed as an audiobook, where the narrator mis pronounced synapse , quite infuriating flag 1 likeLike see review View 1 comment Mar 21, 2017 Dean Jarvey rated it it was amazing Very readable and thought provoking A favorite quote understanding all the shortcomings that our memory system presents allows us to adhere to a whole new ethos Our past is a fictional representation, and the only thing we can be even somewhat sure of is what is happening now It encourages us to live in the moment and not to place too much importance on our past It forces us to accept that the best time of our lives, and our memory, is right now flag 1 likeLike see review Jan 18, 2017 Willian Molinari rated it liked it Shelves audio, non fiction, audible deal The whole point of this book is to show that our memories are not reliable.We can t be sure that something happened because a lot of things may influence our past memories.The good argument in favor of this book is its references There are many references for academic studies The bad part is that it is not so comfortable to read, the language is not that good.At the end, you will learn some interesting facts about how your memory work flag 1 likeLike see review Jul 13, 2016 Heather G rated it really liked it Great balance of social science and neuroscience and surprisingly accessible I would have liked to hear about Shaw s work, but still felt satisfied by her exploration of memory and identity and the social implications of trusting in our fallible neurons The historical perspective and case studies were also effective in developing and illustrating Shaw s arguments flag 1 likeLike see review Feb 09, 2017 Dfranke30 rated it really liked it I would write a review, but I m unable to accurately remember the details Interesting book worth reading This book contains a wealth of information about how our brains process memories, which is delivered in easy to understand language with plenty of examples and stories flag 1 likeLike see review View 1 comment previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next new topicDiscuss This Book There are no discussion topics on this book yet Be the first to start one Share Recommend It Stats Recent Status Updates Readers Also Enjoyed

    The Memory Illusion Book In The Memory Illusion, psychological scientist and memory expert Dr Julia Shaw uses the latest research to show the astonishing variety of ways in which our memory can be led astray She shows why we can sometimes misappropriate other people s memories, subsequently believing them to be our own. The Memory Illusion Remembering, Forgetting, and the In The Memory Illusion, forensic psychologist and memory expert Dr Julia Shaw draws on the latest research to show why our memories so often play tricks on us and how, if we understand their fallibility, we can actually improve their accuracy The result is an exploration of our minds that both fascinating and unnerving, and that will make you question how much you can ever truly know about yourself. The Memory Illusion Dr Julia Shaw The Memory Illusion In The Memory Illusion, Dr Julia Shaw uses the latest research to show the astonishing variety of ways in which our memory can indeed be led astray Fascinating and unnerving in equal measure, The Memory Illusion offers a unique insight into the human brain, challenging you to question how much you can ever truly know about yourself. The Memory Illusion Remembering, Forgetting, and the In The Memory Illusion, forensic psychologist and memory expert Dr Julia Shaw uses the latest research to show the astonishing variety of ways in which our brains can indeed be led astray She shows why we can sometimes misappropriate other people s memories, subsequently believing them to The Memory Illusion Scientific American Blog Network The Memory Illusion will be released in June in English by Penguin Random House and by Doubleday Canada, and translated and released in German, MEMORY ILLUSION Psychology Dictionary MEMORY ILLUSION Nugent, Pam M.S defines the process where a memory or event becomes distorted and the person will then remember something that never actually happened in order to fill any gaps MEMORY ILLUSION When recalling a memory, any distortion or change to the details are called memory illusions The Memory Illusion Why You Might Not Be Who You Think In The Memory Illusion, forensic psychologist and memory expert Dr Julia Shaw uses the latest research to show the astonishing variety of ways in which our brains can indeed be led astray She shows why we can sometimes misappropriate other people s memories, subsequently believing them to The Memory Illusion, or how to create fake memories The Memory Illusion author Julia Shaw Julia Shaw doesn t believe in facts as a presence in our memories, which the rest us consider a historical as well as emotional record of our lives Or, for that matter, in the idea of a single agreed upon reality I just believe in the concept of personal reality, says the year old Canadian psychologist.

    • Best Download [Julia Shaw] ✓ The Memory Illusion: Remembering, Forgetting, and the Science of False Memory || [Romance Book] PDF ✓
      110 Julia Shaw
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    About "Julia Shaw"

      • Julia Shaw

        Julia Shaw is an honorary research associate at the University College London Born in Germany and raised in Canada, she has a MS in psychology and law and a PhD in psychology from the University of British Columbia She is a regular contributor to Scientific American.


    850 Comments

    1. I am conflicted about this book It deserves 5 stars because of its excellent investigation into how memory works and the book s ability to convey the finer points to a large audience Writing such an accessible book on an important topic, such as faulty memory, will help make the much needed shift from understanding memory as something that is a bit faulty but is, in general, fairly reliable to understanding memory as a retrospective analysis of an old memory that does not reflect the actual ev I [...]


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    3. Generally a good and accessible read covering a wide range of science related to memory Good if you like your scientists to quote plenty of research and remain accessible Debunks all sorts of myths about memories including things like repressed memories The topic is an important one, and one that of us could do with understanding Pleasantly well written, although the best parts are the beginning and the end I found some of the chapters in the middle a little dull The basic message i Generally a [...]


    4. I finished the book without developing any real affection for it On the upside, there were plenty of examples and case studies which unusually for a book of this type were not rooted entirely in studies and statistics from the USA.On the downside, I felt that interesting points were raised, and then case studies and discussions were engaged to add to the point that or less failed to add any real value.Did it enhance my understanding of memory A bit But I think my actual take away learn I finish [...]


    5. A lovely book Filled with scientific citations, anecdotes and provoking information It was an easy read, than again, it was also a very insightful book Though I was hoping for a specific content, this book didn t disappoint as far as I m concerned It touched subjects such as cognitive biases, working memory, long term memory, biology, psychology, criminology, identity and mnemonics It offered scientific facts and also ethical applications, and some applications I would strongly sugges A lovely [...]



    6. WOW So, prior to starting this book I was fairly well read and educated in the topic, but I have to say I found this book quite useful and impressive nonetheless.It is accessible to the layman with no prior knowledge in the topic, but as I said, even advanced students will find their fill of fun.Julia Shaw talks about everything in just the right detail, with just the right amount of evidence to support her points, in just the right language.Don t be mislead by the title Yes, the emphasis is on [...]


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