Things I Learned About My Dad in Therapy

Things I Learned About My Dad in Therapy

Heather B. Armstrong / Jul 16, 2019

Things I Learned About My Dad in Therapy Perfectly timed for Father s Day this collection of hilarious stories by some of the brightest and most outrageous bloggers celebrates the joys and otherwise of fatherhood

  • Title: Things I Learned About My Dad in Therapy
  • Author: Heather B. Armstrong
  • ISBN: 9780758216595
  • Page: 330
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Perfectly timed for Father s Day, this collection of hilarious stories by some of the brightest and most outrageous bloggers celebrates the joys and otherwise of fatherhood.

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    About "Heather B. Armstrong"

      • Heather B. Armstrong

        My name is Heather B Armstrong Some of you may remember me as Heather B Hamilton I am married to a charming geek named Jon We live in Salt Lake City, Utah, with our four year old daughter, Leta Elise, and our six year old SuperMutt, Chuck, and a ten month old miniature Australian Shepherd, Coco The chaos in our house is unreal.


    861 Comments

    1. Some of these essays literally forced me to turn off my book player because I was laughing so hard I couldn't hear the text. Not all of them were that funny, but one or two of them certainly were. Sarah Brown's essay on admitting she simply loved her dad and got along extremely well with him was a nice change to the widely accepted and hailed idea that dads are the appendix of the family, hanging in there maybe, but not all that useful.I think the second essay in the collection was the funniest [...]


    2. There were about two essays that I did not care for but the rest were very touching in one way or another. I am not close with my father and naturally have never really experienced the intimacy of fatherhood in a sense that I have motherhood. Exploring these close relationships makes me a little sad, and there's a pang of jealousy there too. However, I anticipate the future when I can witness the relationship Scott will have with our kids. I have no doubt in my mind that he will be an amazing da [...]


    3. A few of these essays were brilliant pieces of writing. Moving, funny, and very clever. But you have to wade through some duds to appreciate the good stuff. Alice Bradley, Doug French, Maggie Mason, and James Griffioen's were some of my favorites.


    4. I really enjoyed this. It has been awhile since I have read a collection of essays (the last was Sedaris which I did not like. I'm sorry! I know I'm supposed to like it! But I didn't!) Sadly, with two older boys and a new baby, sitting down for a ten or fifteen minute read is the perfect amount for me, and it was nice to start each reading session with someone new. I read several of the blogs by the writers, and this made some of the essays feel like they were written by old friends, which is a [...]


    5. I've been looking forward to this collection for several reasons. #1, I truly enjoy Heather's blog -- she makes me laugh and think and yell WTF? on a daily basis. The topic of fatherhood really caught my attention, too, as my husband is a much more hands-on father than my dad was, and also because my dad passed away 8 years ago so there's an entirely different dynamic there now.Overall, I wasn't that impressed. There were about three or four GOOD essays here, and the rest were just so-so. This m [...]


    6. I hadn't realized that Dooce was just the editor and the contributor of one of the essays. I enjoyed this book more than I had thought I would, although at least two of the essays went into some darker experiences with fathers than the rest. Another difficulty was that everything was in first person, so I sort of glommed all the stories I'd already read into one narrative, which was retrospectively confusing.


    7. I really like the essays by Heather B. Armstrong and a few of the other bloggers. Unfortunately there were a couple essays that just seemed disjointed and unrelated. I laughed while reading most essays and got a bit teary-eyed during a couple of others. It really was quite interesting to get so many different viewpoints in one little book.


    8. I am just about done with this very funny read. Some of the essays are so funny I had tears running down my face. Others are just very honest and true to life, and they all make you think a little more about your own father/husband/self (depending on who you are) and what role they play in your life.


    9. When I first started reading through this essay collection, I wasn't particularly entranced with it, but it definitely grew on me. I loved, in particular, Sarah Brown's essay about her kick-arse Dad, and Jon Armstrong's essay about his relationship with his father, as well as "Long Live the Weeds and the Wilderness Yet" by James Griffioen.


    10. I bought this book for James Griffioen's essay (blogger extraordinare of Sweet-Juniper), and it didn't disappoint. The essays by Heather Armstrong, Jon Armstrong, and Sarah Brown were also fun reads.


    11. I must confess a little something. I have been an avid reader of Dooce for years. It is a "mommy blog," yes, but I enjoyed it well before I had a child. I love the writing most of all. So, when Heather B. Armstrong, the creator of Dooce, published her first book, I had to read it. It Sucked and Then I Cried is an excellent memoir that explores pregnancy and being a new mother and post-partum depression and mental illness. And it's hilarious. Did I mention that Armstrong lives in Utah?Armstrong's [...]


    12. This is a book of essays about fathers compiled and edited by Heather Armstrong (Dooce). Some stories are about being a father, some are about the writers' fathers. All of the authors are bloggers and some people have had issue with this. That many of these stories were already mostly written on the web somewhere. I didn't have an issue and I enjoyed the book. I read Dooce daily, but none of the other writer's sites, so most of this was new to me. Even the essay by Jon, Heather's husband, was ne [...]


    13. I love Dooce. It was the blog that sparked my need to get a blog of my own. I still read it daily and enjoy Heather's sharp wit and brutal honesty. So when I heard about this book I snatched it up right away because I was so excited to read something written by her. I knew it was a colaboration of essays from other writers/bloggers as well but was surprised to discover how little of Heather there was in the book. And while some of the entries had me rolling on the floor holding my gut in explodi [...]


    14. This book of essays was a nice read, but nothing spectacular. Some were better than others. The second-to-last one was just bizarre and rambling.This would be a nice gift to a new father. Several of the essays written by men about being fathers were really great. I laughed out loud over some of them. The editor, Heather Armstrong, should have just gone with that theme instead of including stories by her various blogging friends about fathers and fatherhood. There was only one written by a woman [...]


    15. Got the book "fresh from the oven". It was sent by my friend in London as soon as it appear on . I think I'm one of the first Indonesian who read it. Dooce is always my number one writer. Love her blog, love her book too. This book contains pieces of story from several coolest blog in the world. Dooce's story is unquestionably rock, but other manuscripts she chooses is also superb. She pick fatherhood as a theme, but it's actually only the wrap. In the inside we would find lots of entertaining, [...]


    16. No self respecting 'Doocefan' can call themselves a 'Doocefan', if they haven't read this book. Now a die-hard 'Doocefan' probably would have sent their copy of the book to Heather Armstrong herself for an autograph And an, "I'll be a 'Doocefan' 'til the day I die", 'Doocefan' would've bought an airline ticket to Salt Lake City, Utah for her book signing yesterday. Me, I just bought the book at the local Border's and read it. I'm not some wacked out blog fan that warrants a restraining order BUT [...]


    17. I gave this three stars because some of the essays were better than others, which is to be expected. And the quote blocks annoyed me. I get that they're trying to grab my attention by highlighting one of the best lines, but this is not a magazine article. It's a bookat I'm already reading.Anyway, all in all it was enjoyable and insightful, despite some unevenness (is that a word?) in the writing. If I had kids, I'd probably enjoy it even moreTE: I recommended this book to chick-lit lovers, but i [...]


    18. when i finished, i tried to think what i would tell kristen - whether or not she should read it. we're both huge dooce fanatics, so not reading it is not an option, but for me at least, i loved what was written by those i already loved and was confirmed that i was right on those i was already not into at all. you think - oh fantastic, dooce and finslippy in a book together! but then you're like, oh yes, but its about fatherhood and being a father or having one or someone else's father. i will st [...]


    19. Update- I finished. This is a great book. I'll warn you, there was one story that made me cry myself to sleep, but in a good way I guess. I've been reading this one for a couple weeks now. It's not a long book, but I find when I read a compilation of short stories it takes me longer to get through everything with the lack of story that brings you back night after night. That isn't to say the stories in here are boring by any means! They are fantastic. I'm considering getting my dad and grandpa c [...]


    20. This is a book compiled by Heather Armstrong, the author of dooce. Since I already knew that I liked her, I knew that this book would be a really fun read. It is a collection of short stories about being a father, or remembering something about the author's dad. Some of them were laugh out loud funny and some were serious. I highly recommend this book as one that you read out loud to someone. Nate and I read it together. It's enjoyable alone, but much more fun to share with someone else. My favo [...]


    21. Fantastically easy to read, this collection of essays from fathers and the occasional mother is another genre I love. Heather Armstrong is the author of one of my favorite blogs - after Perez Hilton, of course: dooce. Her effortless style and rhythm is one I relate to, look up to, and hope to make my own someday. (With a twist, of course. I'm not saying I wanna sound exactly like her.) But this lady's got a mighty fine thing going. I hope she does another collection of essays in the future.


    22. A pretty good collection of essays, although, unfortunately, several of them sounded rather bloggy. (Nothing against blogs, but when I pick up a book I'd like to read a book, not a blog.) There were a few essays that had a very disjointed feel to them, and a few others with a very self-important tone to them. But others were good. By far my favorite is the peas essay :) I may go buy this book for myself just for that essay (I gave the copy I read to my dad for Father's Day). It was humorous, and [...]


    23. This book was thoroughly entertaining and very heartfelt. But I was expecting something more. More of that in your face, laugh out loud, politically incorrect, caps locked, colorful writing that defines Dooce (and Heather). Obviously, the book wasn’t going to be the same as her website because, after all, she didn’t write all of the essays. But sometimes it felt a littleflat, too simple. Overall, it was a good book, and definitely something I would recommend to others


    24. I LOVE dooce so I was expecting to LOVE this book, as Dooce herself was both a contributor and the editor. I suppose the reason I don't really like collections of essays or short stories is that I tend to not like ALL of the writers included and I sometimes have difficulty pushing through to the next one, and that was the case here. Some essays were funny or touching or generally great, and some were just dull.Overall, I was expecting more.


    25. Collection of essays edited by Dooce author, Heather Armstrong. Much on fatherhood, parenting and being the child of a remarkable, good and bad father. Many were funny, some were poignant and a few were a little confusing. Sometimes blog writers don't translate to essay writers because there is such continuity with the readers who know and love you, versus the readers who just pull a book off a shelf at the library. Overall some interesting ideas on parenting and fatherhood and worth the read.


    26. I think I expected a bit more out of this book. I liked the first essay by Heather a lot and I liked a few of the others, but I expected them to be laugh-out-loud funny or brutally tender or incisive and wise. What I got out of the book was a more grating and harsh worldview than I really wanted. There seem to be some really great writers in this group, but I think the style was just a bit much for me.


    27. There are a few decent essays in here. I like Eden Kennedy's; there are aspects of Leah Peterson's that are at least interesting, and those are just the two popping to mind, but a lot of it falls short. I feel like there is a voice on a blog where you can get this whole sense of a person's voice that gets lost in singular essays in a book. Some of these would make perfectly good blog posts, but on the page un-surrounded by all that other fodderjust blah.


    28. A fun little read just in time for Father's Day. Not nearly as funny as Heather's own book (It sucked and then I cried), but given that this book was just a collection of different authors, I couldn't expect it to be. I wish I had one funny story from the book that I could take-away with me, or a funny quote to write in my dad's Father's Day card this weekend, but no such luck.


    29. This book is a collection of essays about dads edited by the author of dooce. I enjoyed the most of the essays, but I especially loved the ones in the beginning chapters dealing with pregnancy and young children. I was also happy to be introduced to some fabulous writers as well. Although I don't have children, the book was relatable and a entertaining read.


    30. I didn't so much finish this book as give up during the last essay. I read most of this book in a couple days then had to bring myself to go back to it after a couple of boring pieces. "Hit or miss" is definitely the phrase to use. The newspaper-style block quotes bumped it from 3 to 2 stars what an awful design!


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