Welcome to Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife

Welcome to Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife

John M. Marzluff Jack Delap / Jul 24, 2019

Welcome to Subirdia Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens Robins Woodpeckers and Other Wildlife Even as growing cities and towns pave acres of landscape some bird species have adapted and thrived How has this come about Welcome to Subirdia presents a surprising discovery the suburbs of many lar

  • Title: Welcome to Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife
  • Author: John M. Marzluff Jack Delap
  • ISBN: 9780300197075
  • Page: 435
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Even as growing cities and towns pave acres of landscape, some bird species have adapted and thrived How has this come about Welcome to Subirdia presents a surprising discovery the suburbs of many large cities support incredible biological diversity Populations and communities of a great variety of birds, as well as other creatures, are adapting to the conditions of ourEven as growing cities and towns pave acres of landscape, some bird species have adapted and thrived How has this come about Welcome to Subirdia presents a surprising discovery the suburbs of many large cities support incredible biological diversity Populations and communities of a great variety of birds, as well as other creatures, are adapting to the conditions of our increasingly developed world In this fascinating and optimistic book, John Marzluff reveals how our own actions affect the birds and animals that live in our cities and towns, and he provides ten specific strategies everyone can use to make human environments friendlier for our natural neighbors Over many years of research and fieldwork, Marzluff and student assistants have closely followed the lives of thousands of tagged birds seeking food, mates, and shelter in cities and surrounding areas From tiny Pacific wrens to grand pileated woodpeckers, diverse species now compatibly share human surroundings By practicing careful stewardship with the biological riches in our cities and towns, Marzluff explains, we can foster a new relationship between humans and other living creatures one that honors and enhances our mutual destiny.

    Welcome to Subirdia Jan , Welcome to Subirdia is a fantastic and informative book about bird populations and their sustainability The author, John Marzluff, is a wildlife scientist and ornithologist living in Seattle He and students working with him study various populations of birds in the area and the habitats in which Excerpt Welcome to Subirdia Audubon Oct , Welcome to Subirdia, by John M Marzluff, Yale University Press, pages, . Buy it on The views expressed in user comments do not reflect the views of Audubon Audubon does not participate in political campaigns, nor do we support or oppose candidates Don t Sell Out Welcome to Subirdia NPR NPR coverage of Welcome to Subirdia Sharing Our Neighborhoods With Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife by John M Marzluff and Jack Delap News, author interviews, critics picks and . Welcome to Subirdia Yale University Press Welcome to Subirdia presents a surprising discovery the suburbs of many large cities support incredible biological diversity Populations and communities of a great variety of birds, as well as other creatures, are adapting to the conditions of our increasingly developed world. Welcome to Subirdia Bellevue Botanical Garden John Marzluff is a nationally known Professor of Wildlife Science at the University of Washington, and an expert in Ornithology Part of the joy of gardening is observing and listening to our feathered friends In his latest book, Welcome to Subirdia Sharing our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, welcome to subirdia by john marzluff birds that adapt Though we hear a lot less about urban ecology, it s not always the case that the least disturbed places on earth always have the most birds In fact, says Dr John Marzluff in his book Welcome to Subirdia, the greatest variety of birds is often found in the suburbs, where we humans are in great density, too. Book Review Welcome to Subirdia, by John Marzluff All Apr , For the cover of the new edition of my book On the Edge of the Wild, Russian artist Vadim Gorbatov painted a striking image of a yellow eyed Northern Goshawk attacking a crow.But the scene is not one of wilderness in its background is Vadim s apartment in Moscow Just one of the amazing observations in John Marzluff s groundbreaking and entertaining new book, Welcome to Subirdia Welcome to Subirdia An Excerpt North Cascades Institute Mar , As part of our Nature in Writing series, John Marzluff reads from Welcome to Subirdia Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife, Friday, April rd, pm, in the Readings Gallery at Village Books in Bellingham Free by John MarzluffMy research and Welcome to Subirdia YouTube Jan , In Welcome to Subirdia, Dr Marzluff will reveal that settled lands are often remarkably rich in bird diversity, and suggest how they may play a key role in preventing loss of species in the face BOOK DISCUSSION GROUPWelcome to Subirdia Olympic Welcome to Subirdia presents a surprising discovery the suburbs of many large cities support incredible biological diversity Populations and communities of a great variety of birds, as well as other creatures, are adapting to the conditions of our increasingly developed world.

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      Posted by:John M. Marzluff Jack Delap
      Published :2019-02-27T22:16:38+00:00

    About "John M. Marzluff Jack Delap"

      • John M. Marzluff Jack Delap

        John Marzluff is assistant professor of wildlife science in the Ecosystem Science and Conservation Division at the University of Washington in Seattle He is the author of Dog Days, Raven Nights, Urban Ecology, and In the Company of Crows and Ravens.


    217 Comments

    1. written by famous author of crow/raven research, written for all natural historians on your block, about birds and animals that live in humans' towns and cities, and suburbia, whatever you might want to consider "that' place it. so first, consider this, as a frame for this topic: usa has 2% of their land in industrial (usually imported varieties of grass, in monochromatic plantings, need constant care, mowing, petrol-chemicals, and water to "look good) lawn, and we spill , SPILL, 17 million gall [...]


    2. On pages 101--102 the author describes Brewer's blackbirds waiting for Costco to open. It reminded me of the gulls at Wrigley Field that always seemed to arrive around the 8th inning, waiting their turn for all the discarded food.


    3. Now that is what I call a GOODREAD!What I expected: tips on how to make your backyard a haven for birds. What I got? So much more!Like, there is actual research being done on birds in suburbia. Some lineages may even be speciating thanks to humans.If you are at all tuned into conservationist ideas, you know that human development ain't so great for nature. And, suburbia in particular, could be characterized as a kind of blight. Unless you are a birdWell, ok there are certainly many birds who don [...]


    4. "Welcome to Subirdia" is a fantastic and informative book about bird populations and their sustainability. The author, John Marzluff, is a wildlife scientist and ornithologist living in Seattle. He and students working with him study various populations of birds in the area and the habitats in which they live. Birds are divided into three categories, depending on their adaptability--avoiders (i.e. wood thrushes, warblers), adapters (i.e. robins, cardinals), and exploiters (i.e.pigeons, song spar [...]


    5. "Find the feeder and avoid the feline" is John M. Marzluff's advice to birds, and mostly sums up this book. He thoroughly describes how birds adapt or not to suburban and urban development. I was surprised to learn that the picture is far from bleak--"subirdia" supports a great diversity of bird life, all over the globe. Unfortunately, so many cities and suburbs are starting to lose their distinct geographical distinctions and look like everywhere else-ville, which is reflected in some of the bi [...]


    6. A fairly comprehensive look at how the edges of human cities are changing not only habitats and which species inhabit them, but bird evolution, behavior, and interactions. The results of human encroachment aren't all bad nor particularly beneficial. The illustrations are a nice touch, even if the choices of what to highlight--a dead robin, for instance, are sometimes curious.Speaking of evolution--this book also provides what could be called an introductory primer on social evolution, cultural e [...]


    7. University of Washington Professor of Wildlife Science John Marzluff has become a leading interpreter of the secret lives of birds (especially corvids) through his books In the Company of Crows and Ravens and Gifts of the Crow. In his latest, Welcome to Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers and Other Wildlife, he looks toward one of the more common human habitats in North America—suburban sprawl—and finds it to be more teeming with diverse plant, insect, animal [...]


    8. In this heavily developed world, as Marzluff points out,remarkably many birds continue to thrive. In addition to sharing research data on bird adaptations to urban environs from a variety of cities, including Seattle, Marzluff clearly lays out "9 commandments"for being good neighbors to birds and other wildlife. These provide tangible ways that we can all contribute to maintaining a more biologically diverse,stable world. This is an important book that will positively influence landscape designs [...]


    9. Very informative. Gorgeous illustrations. While this book has more of a textbook feel, it should appeal to avid bird watchers as well as those showing an interest in ornithology.


    10. Interesting book about birds primarily and other animals and their relationship to human settlements. The author points out that some species do quite well with humans nearby and that biological evolution can occur quite quickly, relatively speaking, as demonstrated by the physical differences that already manifest themselves between birds in cities and towns versus the same species out in the wild. Cultural evolution happens even more quickly as birds adapt themselves to human settlements. The [...]


    11. HopefulMarzluff introduces readers to the diversity that suburban and urban areas can provide to birds that avoid, adapt to or even exploit the environments we build. His and a variety of other scientists, students and citizen scientists are observing, counting, banding and tracking birds, showing that while a few species are being pushed out of our cities, overall diversity is increasing. An entire section of the book offers many simple and a few not so simple steps we can take to preserve and [...]


    12. The weekend of February 12th, will be the Great Backyard Bird Count. Every year Participants are asked to count birds for as little as 15 minutes (or as long as they wish) on one or more days of the four-day event and report their sightings online at birdcount. Anyone can take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count, from beginning bird watchers to experts, and you can participate from your backyard, or anywhere in the world. This book is a wonderful complement to that coming attraction. Its appea [...]


    13. Most people have heard stories about how wildlife has been negatively affected by deforestation and people taking over natural habitats. For example, seventy five percent of 125 or so native Hawaiian birds present 4000 years ago when human first colonized the islands are now extinct. WELCOME TO SUBIRDIA provides a great deal of information about the effects of human activity on wildlife, particularly birds, as they move into previously natural environments. The changes are not all negative, but [...]


    14. Title: Welcome to Subirdia Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife Author: John M Marzluff Illustrator: Jack DeLapPublisher: Yale Universty Press Published: 9-30-2014 ISBN: 9780300197075Pages: 320 Genre: Outdoors & Nature Tags: Birds Overall Rating: Excellent Reviewed For: NetGalley Reviewer: DelAnneThere is a saying that nature always finds away. From frogs in changing sex in the when there is an imbalance. To the crows nesting and living at Urban airp [...]


    15. This book mainly focuses on mainland America but also looks at Britain and Hawaii. We see that bird species have had to cope with the spread of urban habitats and some have thrived while others have been lost or reduced. Species are categorised as avoiders, adapters or exploiters of urban habitats. The author lists nine ways to make our home areas more attractive and helpful to birds. These include putting up nest boxes, adding stickers or blinds to high windows and planting berry bushes in the [...]


    16. Very well written, informative book. It provides a blueprint for future urban planning that could provide hope for us in the future with respect to the environment and climate change. I learned things about the birds that I watch in my own yard and got some other ideas about how to enhance that and make our yard even better for birds and wildlife in the city.


    17. This is an informative and hopeful book, about welcoming birds into our urban environments. Thirteen years of exhaustive and painstaking study by teams of 8 or 10, the author tells us, went into this book and its recommendations, about how and why birds and other wildlife adapt to our suburbsor don't. There are the exploiters, who love us, or at least our lawns, the adapters, who find ways to make do, and the avoiders, who just can't thrive amongst us. The author tells ways we can make our space [...]


    18. As an urban ornithologist myself, I was thrilled to receive this book. Marzluff is clearly a talented and passionate ornithologist, but to my great pleasure, also a strong writer with a unique voice. I never thought suburban ecology could be so readable!The stunning illustrations are the icing on the cake. I read Subirdia as an ebook, but would have loved to have seen the illustrations in their full glory in print.Highly recommended for bird-nerds (I include myself), urban planners, and anyone w [...]


    19. As the title suggests, this book includes a great deal of information on how specific species adapt to, or are hindered by life within human communities. Including—but not limited to—topics such as ecology, conservation and evolution, the text details the impact of our modern lifestyle on the health and welfare the bird population. Written in a straight-forward easy to understand style, the book comes across as half textbook, half auto-biographical. The one minor issue I had was that the boo [...]


    20. This was a delightful read, upbeat and informative. Marzluff not only gives us a clear sighted view of the state of bird and mammal populations in the face of unending construction around our cities, but also offers expert advice on how to increase the diversity, and health of those populations. It is much more optimistic than I had considered such a study could be, but we need to take Marzluff's advice seriously. There is just too much at risk to ignore the impact that we're having on nature.


    21. Smart, lively, and eminently readable. Marzluff's explications of his research are rich and clear, and I especially appreciated his obvious affection and respect for his students and colleagues--this is a terrific illustration of the incremental, collaborative nature of science and also a good primer on basic ecological/evolutionary ideas.Read in a tent, though the soundtrack was rainsong, not birdsong!


    22. I'd give this a 2.5 if I could. I loved the illustrations and I valued the message of the book, but I found the book very, very difficult to get into as a lay person. It was like reading 100 orinthology journal articles in a row - I just don't have the background for it. I found Lyanda Lynn Haupt's Urban Bestiary to be a much more approachable and enjoyable read - giving me similar kinds of information, but in a simpler and more lay person friendly way.


    23. A rather dry and academic study of birds. Marzluff makes the distinction between adapters and avoiders, the latter generally being endangered. He cites the common birds that inhabit urban and suburban areas which are often more welcoming than the vast agricultural lands. Several times, he points out the depredation that cats make on birds, killing far more than anything else.


    24. Illustrations, while obviously digital and by Illustrator, are excellent. Prose is wordy & dull. Marzluff is far too narcissistic to offer much on birds and suburban life and realizing that, halfway through the book he turns to the urban scavenger group like deer, bear etc. Unfortunately this book is a waste of time.


    25. An exploration of what types of bird thrive in urban and suburban environments, how to create better environments for a wider diversity of birds and other wildlife, Marzluff often presents surprising facts and findings.


    26. First Chapters address birds in urban environment although details are fragmentary and leave you wanting more explicit details. Narrative devolves into rather wandering general urban conversation advocacy not specific to birds, bird habitat,etc


    27. If you are into birds, this is a wonderful book. I had hoped foe a bit more memoir out of the text-- but the stories he relays about birds living on the edges are wonderful.


    28. a good book for the backyard birder. some nice insight as to how humans change their surroundings and how that effects birds for better or for worse.



    29. So much work went into the bird watching to create this book and it shows in the information the author shares. The illustrations are terrific.


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