Bellarion the Fortunate: A Romance

Bellarion the Fortunate: A Romance

Rafael Sabatini / Aug 18, 2019

Bellarion the Fortunate A Romance Size x approximately Pages pages Binding Cover Hardback without dust jacketSize x approximately Pages pages Binding Cover Hardback without dust jacket

  • Title: Bellarion the Fortunate: A Romance
  • Author: Rafael Sabatini
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 264
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Size 7x 5 approximately Pages 446 pages Binding Cover Hardback without dust jacketSize 7 x 5 approximately Pages 446 pages Binding Cover Hardback without dust jacket

    Bellarion the Fortunate Bellarion the Fortunate Bellarion the Fortunate, published in , is an historical novel by Rafael Sabatini Set at the beginning of the th century in northern Italy, it takes place first in the Marquessate of Montferrat and later in the Duchy of Milan Most of its characters, including Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Gian Maria Visconti, Bellarion the Fortunate by Rafael Sabatini Community Reviews Bellarion, sometimes called The Fortunate, starts out as a young novice from an Italian monastery who is sent to study in Pavia, the great city of learning near Milan Then in Casale, the capital of Montferrat, an unexpected adventure sends Bellarion fleeing for his life right into a garden where he finds the Princess Valeria, Bellarion the Fortunate Rafael Sabatini BELLARION The Fortunate illustrated and millions of other books are available for Kindle Learn Enter your mobile number or email address below and we ll send you a Bellarion the Fortunate Rafael Sabatini Bellarion the Fortunate Bellarion the Fortunate is the perfect mix of political intrigue, action and romance written by Rafael Sabatini at the top of his game A G Lindsay rimfire A review by Simon McLeish at his home page. Bellarion The Fortunate Project Gutenberg Australia Bellarion the Fortunate, self styled adopted son of Facino Cane, Governor of Milan, was to need every favour that Fortune could bestow when he found himself caught up in the web of intrigue and ambition that characterized the ducal courts of Italy in the th century. Bellarion the Fortunate A Romance fadedpage Bellarion the Fortunate, published in , is an historical novel by Rafael Sabatini Set at the beginning of the th century in northern Italy, it takes place first in Bellarion the Fortunate by Rafael Sabatini NOOK Book Bellarion the Fortunate by Rafael Sabatini Set against a backdrop of pre Renaissance Italy, convent bred orphan Bellarion is sidetracked almost immediately upon setting out on a journey from the monastery at Cigliano to study at Pavia The adventure and practical lessons he finds along the way replace the further education he craves. Bellarion The Fortunate A Romance Historical Novel Society Bellarion The Fortunate A Romance Written by Rafael Sabatini Review by John R Vallely Rafael Sabatini had earned quite a name for himself as a writer of both historical novels and biographies in the first part of the th century.

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    About "Rafael Sabatini"

      • Rafael Sabatini

        Rafael Sabatini 1875 1950 was an Italian British writer of novels of romance and adventure At a young age, Rafael was exposed to many languages By the time he was seventeen, he was the master of five languages He quickly added a sixth language English to his linguistic collection After a brief stint in the business world, Sabatini went to work as a writer He wrote short stories in the 1890s, and his first novel came out in 1902 Sabatini was a prolific writer he produced a new book approximately every year He consciously chose to write in his adopted language, because, he said, all the best stories are written in English In all, he produced thirty one novels, eight short story collections, six nonfiction books, numerous uncollected short stories, and a play He is best known for his world wide bestsellers The Sea Hawk 1915 , Scaramouche 1921 , Captain Blood 1922 and Bellarion the Fortunate 1926 Other famous works by Sabatini are The Lion s Skin 1911 , The Strolling Saint 1913 and The Snare 1917.


    877 Comments

    1. I enjoyed this one but, would only recommend it to people who already like Sabtini. This is one of his larger cast novels with chracters comining in and out. The novel is set in Italy so all the characters names are in Italian which for me is not as easy to keep straight. Two of the characters are brothers and they names are almost idenitical. Probably on a second read through the novel would be easier to read through.Bellarion is a young innocent who is about to make a side trip into the real w [...]


    2. Bellarion, sometimes called The Fortunate, starts out as a young novice from an Italian monastery who is sent to study in Pavia, the great city of learning near Milan. Then in Casale, the capital of Montferrat, an unexpected adventure sends Bellarion fleeing for his life right into a garden where he finds the Princess Valeria, who, plotting against her evil usurper of an uncle, is in danger of going in over her head. Bellarion, somewhat to his own surprise, immediately puts all his learning, tri [...]


    3. Whenever anybody talks about Rafael Sabatini's best works, Scaramouche and Captain Blood are often recommended.But Bellarion in my opinion is as good as any of them.Extra star for a hero who uses his brain rather than his brawn, the haughty princess who disdains him till the last minute.Plus the political manoeuvrings and the historical setting.What's not to love?


    4. i have mixed feelings about this book.a long time ago i read scaramouche, another similar book by the same author which i enjoyed. However in I am not sure whether I would like it so much if I reread it. I would still recommend that book over this one (more swashbuckling).What i actually liked about this book: the faux historical setting and references - the atmosphere is quite exciting - this book we have northern italy in 15th century, where men may make their name and fortune in mercenary com [...]


    5. Oh fabulous! I do believe that of the various time periods Sabatini writes in, I enjoy his pre-Renaissance Italy the most. Bellarion exemplifies the classic Sabatini hero-- gifted with staggering intelligence matched only by his confidence; a steady composure in the face of every kind of stress; a dark cynicism of the world and men; completed finally with a single, powerful dash of romantic nobility that never ceases to surprise him or those around him. Perhaps the story might seem a little too [...]


    6. Originally published on my blog here in February 2001.By modern standards, Sabatini's prose is rather florid, but it is ideally suited to this tale of early fifteenth century Italian politics. It was a larger than life time, with swaggering condottieri, Machiavellian plotting, and high stakes in politics and war; and Sabatini portrays it atmospherically.Bellarion, his hero, is a young man of extremely poor origins brought up in a monastery. After naively falling in with a false friar on a journe [...]


    7. Another epic to the scale of Captain Blood, the Carolinian and Scaramouche in that the protagonist embroils himself into the fate of a major historical event. Sabatini does not forget any of the many major and minor characters have their actions effect the story all the way through. Unfortunately the least likeable is the protagonist; too perfect and unrelatable. The plot was good but the scenes which we are presented with read like many long sessions of jury duty. Too many detailed arguments to [...]


    8. Now this one of all the Sabatini I've read recently was the most interesting, if a bit of a shocker. I think he may have really pushing his envelop here as he got closer to home history. Oh, he usually skirts around the edge of morality, but without having his protagonist push certain limits. They're always the pirate with a code of honor, forced into the kill, and such. So, when Bellarion killed a man in cold blood just a few short chapters in, with very little compunction, it was a good jolt o [...]


    9. I wasn't expecting so much from this book; well, at least not as much as I got from Rafael Sabatini's better-known stories, Captain Blood, The Sea Hawk, and Scaramouche; but after a slow start, which turned out to be a slow, sure unfolding of the splendid characters and storyline, Bellarion really took off, building with great cleverness of word and deed, until the thrilling end. I give it Five Stars, which for me means that I would I recommend the book, would read it again, and that I will purc [...]


    10. Gorgeously written! The beginning was a little slow but defiantly gets interesting and complicated soon. It is not a blow through kind of book and even though I have a wide vocabulary I try to have a dictionary nearby. Also, Sabatini assumes the reader knows Latin – I don’t but I am starting to learn.


    11. Probably my favorite book by my favorite author. Sabatini is the master of the historical fiction, and this is a nicely woven tale that includes all kinds of great themes: coming of age, love, fighting, misunderstandings, early 15th Century Italy, etc. A real treat to read and re-read (if you're a big fat sap like me).


    12. Classic Sabatini at his best. Bellarion rivals Scaramouche as my favorite. The master of historical adventure fiction who gives Dumas his greatest challenge. Eloquent, philosophical, witty, riveting. Brilliant.


    13. Pure enjoyment. That warm feeling of satisfaction that only Sabatini creates. Adventure writing at its finest!





    14. Actually, I didn't finish the book; I did not find it appealing at all, even though I had totally enjoyed Scaramouche by the same author.


    15. My favorite Sabatini novel.have red it at least 5 times over the years.d went to the trouble of finding myself a copy from Abe Books.


    16. Having loved this book as an adolescent, I returned to it for a weekend binge-read with mingled eagerness and trepidation. For me, at least, it held up well. The prose is ornate, and arguably over-colored, but undeniably skillful. And honestly, if you're reading a novel about a peasant boy orphaned by Italy's medieval civil wars and educated in a convent who accidentally becomes a Ghibelline spy are you really going to object to prose that's ornate almost to a fault? You shouldn't, is my content [...]


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