Adventures in Unhistory: Conjectures on the Factual Foundations of Several Ancient Legends

Adventures in Unhistory: Conjectures on the Factual Foundations of Several Ancient Legends

Avram Davidson George Barr Peter S. Beagle / Oct 17, 2019

Adventures in Unhistory Conjectures on the Factual Foundations of Several Ancient Legends Where did Sinbad Sail Who Fired the Phoenix The Boy Who Cried Werewolf The Great Rough Beast Postscript on Prester John The Secret of Hyperborea What Gave All Those Mammoths Cold Feet And many fiction

  • Title: Adventures in Unhistory: Conjectures on the Factual Foundations of Several Ancient Legends
  • Author: Avram Davidson George Barr Peter S. Beagle
  • ISBN: 9780765307606
  • Page: 457
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Where did Sinbad Sail Who Fired the Phoenix The Boy Who Cried Werewolf The Great Rough Beast Postscript on Prester John The Secret of Hyperborea What Gave All Those Mammoths Cold Feet And many fictional authoritative fantastic deadpan investigations into the real, the true and the things that should be true PREFACE BY PETER S BEAGLEILLUSTRATED BY GEO Where did Sinbad Sail Who Fired the Phoenix The Boy Who Cried Werewolf The Great Rough Beast Postscript on Prester John The Secret of Hyperborea What Gave All Those Mammoths Cold Feet And many fictional authoritative fantastic deadpan investigations into the real, the true and the things that should be true PREFACE BY PETER S BEAGLEILLUSTRATED BY GEORGE BARR Although the wombat is real and the dragon is not, nobody knows what a wombat looks like and everyone knows what a dragon looks like Not a novel, not a book of short stories, Adventures in Unhistory is a book of the fantastic a compendium of magisterial examinations of Mermaids, Mandrakes, and Mammoths Dragons, Werewolves, and Unicorns the Phoenix and the Roc about places such as Sicily, Siberia, and the Moon about heroic, sinister, and legendary persons such as Sindbad, and Aleister Crowley, and Prester John and revealed at last the Secret of Hyperborea The facts are here, the foundations behind rumors, legends, and the imaginations of generations of tale spinners But far from being dry recitals, these meditations, or lectures, or deadpan prose performances are as lively, as crazily inventive, as witty as the best fiction of the author, a writer praised by Gardner Dozois as one of the great short story writers of our times Who, on the subject of Dragons, could write coldly, dispassionately, guided only by logic Certainly not Avram Davidson Certain facts, these facts, deserve than recitation they deserve flourish, verve, gusto, style the late, great Avram Davidson s unique voice That prose which, in the words of Peter S Beagle s Preface to this volume, cries out to be read aloud.

    Unnatural History TV series Unnatural History is a Canadian American television series produced by Warner Horizon Television for Cartoon Network and YTV Originally part of the CN Real block which aired a line of live action reality shows promoted in the summer season of The series is the second scripted, live action show on Cartoon Network after the failure of Out of Jimmy s Head. Hyperborea In Greek mythology the Hyperboreans Ancient Greek , pronounced hyperbre i Latin Hyperborei were a race of giants who lived beyond the North Wind The Greeks thought that Boreas, the god of the North Wind one of the Anemoi, or Winds lived in Thrace, and therefore Hyperborea indicates that it is a region beyond Thrace. Dragn , la enciclopedia libre En Occidente el simbolismo alrededor del dragn es esencialmente el de la lucha La lucha entre el dragn y un hroe o un dios tiene, sin embargo, distintos significados En estos mticos combates el dragn asume dos papeles, el de devorador y el de guardin, que tienen finalmente una sola raz el de un ser csmico en espera, cuya accin implica la muerte o el nacimiento de

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    About "Avram Davidson George Barr Peter S. Beagle"

      • Avram Davidson George Barr Peter S. Beagle

        Avram Davidson was an American Jewish writer of fantasy fiction, science fiction, and crime fiction, as well as the author of many stories that do not fit into a genre niche He won a Hugo Award and three World Fantasy Awards in the science fiction and fantasy genre, a World Fantasy Life Achievement award, and a Queen s Award and an Edgar Award in the mystery genre Davidson edited The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction from 1962 to 1964 His last novel The Boss in the Wall A Treatise on the House Devil was completed by Grania Davis and was a Nebula Award finalist in 1998 The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction says he is perhaps sf s most explicitly literary author.


    503 Comments

    1. Guys, I am like, two pages into this thing and I think it's the greatest thing since baked bread. And I really love baked bread. I will keep you updated. But I am VERY excited about this.Genre: essay? sci fi? I am not sure to be honest. It's kind of a mixture of all sorts of things.Summary: Avram Davidson just sifts through the different theories behind how certain legends came to be. Most of the time, he was able to narrow down the make-believe to something concrete and real. Each chapter was s [...]


    2. This may be my favorite book I read in 2008. Avram Davidson is known for his odd science fiction and fantasy short stories, which are often baroque and loaded with references to historical people and places both famous and obscure. This book is not a collection of short stories, it's not quite fiction, and it's not quite non-fiction, either. Instead, it's kind of like sitting down by the fire with an old crazy-yet-brillient uncle who is determined to tell you his theories about the origins of th [...]


    3. I am so thrilled to see some of Avram Davidson's work coming back into print! I sincerely hope that this author finds new readers thanks to the work of publishers like this one keeping his work alive. I first stumbled upon a story of his in an anthology (from the '70's), and his story stood out as the most creative and intriguing piece in the book. Since then, I've sought out and found his stories in many anthologies dating from the 60's to hisdeath in the early 90's, as well as several of his n [...]


    4. This book reminds me of watching the show Connections. Abrams collects reports, letters, journals, and stories from around the world, going back centuries. He provides conjectures about Sinbad, Prester John, mermaids, unicorns, and other famous legends. It is written in a humorous tone; don’t let the massive research prevent you from reading. I definitely need to look for some of his short stories!


    5. Entirely charming, surprising, literate, Avram leads us along what seems at first fanciful but ultimately convinces. A delight for any fan of legends, myths and ancient stories!


    6. And each connection, it is said, shines and glitters, like a jewel.É deste tipo de pensamento que é feito o substrato do imaginário. Antigos mitos, ideias díspares, histórias que talvez já tenham sido verdadeiras, algures no tempo. Peças desconexas que uma mente inquisitiva poderá vislumbrar como elementos de um puzzle. Este curioso livro de ensaios de Avram Davidson é um pouco isto, uma manta de retalhos de ideias, misturando mito, história, literatura, Ciência e muita conjectura.As [...]


    7. Avram Davidson is the kind of writer who seems to have more fans who are writers than who are just fans. This book features a laudatory introduction by Peter Beagle as well as blurbs on the back by Robert Silverberg and Gene Wolfe talking about how overlooked he is (and I only borrowed it from the library thanks to a blog post by Michael Swanwick endorsing Davidson — in particular, “The Phoenix and the Mirror” — as one of sci-fi/fantasy’s great neglected authors). This particular volum [...]


    8. This book is a bit of an odd bird. To the best of my knowledge, Davidson was a Sci-Fi writer, not a scholar. Yet this book is an attempt by Davidson to explain the origins of many commonly known legends, such as the phoenix or the werewolf. Davidson employs a rather unique, flow-of-consciousness, conversational style of writing. This writing style is not for everyone, and I suspect that a majority of people who don't like this book feel so because of the writing. I, for one, find that the unique [...]


    9. Davidson covers little new ground in these essays, and his unorthodox explanations of the mysteries surveyed can be laboured and unconvincing; but the book is enjoyable enough and one finds intriguing tidbits, mostly tangential to whatever he is supposed to be discussing at the time. However, as other reviewers have observed, Davidson's prose style will not be to everyone's taste. He has chosen to write in the manner of a self-congratulatory pedant, overwhelmed by his own wittiness and erudition [...]


    10. Definitely a book that one will love or hate. The essays, which is not the best way to describe them, most closely resemble listening to the meandering lectures of a tipsy professor in ancient and medieval fantastic literature; they rarely build from a thesis or come to a conclusion, and the arguments are based more on imaginative association than logical or evidential progression. Occasionally they lead to interesting insights into the history of how fantastic beasts were described; more often, [...]


    11. This guy was funny! I loved every inch of this book. . . The first word in the title aptly describes this book; an adventure. One of my favorite parts is where Davidson speculates on this little gem: Ask someone to describe a dragon -- a mythical beast -- they can describe it from head to toe; ask someone to describe a wombat -- an actual beast -- and they would be clueless! --From A Reader's Journal, by d r melbie.


    12. The style of these essays is highly eccentric: rambling and jokey, with some sentences so long you have to pay close attention to understand them. But some of the passages struck me as quite good. More important, though, is that (as it seems to me) the contents, analyses of the origins of some legends, are well-considered and thoroughly researched. I haven't found anything (unintentionally) ridiculous in these essays. In particular, the one about Prester John was really fascinating.


    13. I actually only read bits and pieces of this one. It is a series of stand-alone chapters/short stories, and I didn't feel compelled to read beyond a few. The premise is interesting, but I didn't care for the writing style. I found the rather stream-of-consciousness style overly convoluted and lacking clarity.


    14. UGGGGGGHis book! Some of the sections were interesting (thus the two stars), but most of this book was the literary equivalent of ambien. Most nights all it took was two pages and I was completely asleep. If you like rambling and constant tangents, this book is for you!


    15. Love this book- Davidson is knowledgeable, opinionated and most likely wrong about at least some of his theories but overall I learnt much more than I would have imagined, and look forward to reading a few more of his actuial fictional works.


    16. This book is enlightening, perplexing, hilarious, and frustrating, depending on which sentence of which paragraph of which page I'm looking at. Which, ultimately, strikes me as a good thing; certainly I never got bored!


    17. Superb book, going into the 'factual foundations', or at least best guesses as to the origins of various legends, locations, icons and characters of myth. Not only fascinating but really fun to read.




    18. This book is wonderfully peculiar and also dense. I find I dip into it at random and so expect to be reading it for a long time.


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