Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?: . . . and Other Questions from the Astronomers' In-box at the Vatican Observatory

Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?: . . . and Other Questions from the Astronomers' In-box at the Vatican Observatory

Guy Consolmagno Paul Mueller / Aug 26, 2019

Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial and Other Questions from the Astronomers In box at the Vatican Observatory Witty and thought provoking two Vatican astronomers shed provocative light on some of the strange places where religion and science meet Imagine if a Martian showed up all big ears and big nose like

  • Title: Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?: . . . and Other Questions from the Astronomers' In-box at the Vatican Observatory
  • Author: Guy Consolmagno Paul Mueller
  • ISBN: 9780804136952
  • Page: 248
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Witty and thought provoking, two Vatican astronomers shed provocative light on some of the strange places where religion and science meet Imagine if a Martian showed up, all big ears and big nose like a child s drawing, and he asked to be baptized How would you react Pope Francis, May, 2014 PopeWitty and thought provoking, two Vatican astronomers shed provocative light on some of the strange places where religion and science meet Imagine if a Martian showed up, all big ears and big nose like a child s drawing, and he asked to be baptized How would you react Pope Francis, May, 2014 Pope Francis posed that question without insisting on an answer to provoke deeper reflection about inclusiveness and diversity in the Church But it s not the first time that question has been asked.Brother Guy Consolmagno and Father Paul Mueller hear questions like that all the time They re scientists at the Vatican Observatory, the official astronomical research institute of the Catholic Church In Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial they explore a variety of questions at the crossroads of faith and reason How do you reconcile the The Big Bang with Genesis Was the Star of Bethlehem just a pious religious story or an actual description of astronomical events What really went down between Galileo and the Catholic Church and why do the effects of that confrontation still reverberate to this day Will the Universe come to an end And could you really baptize an extraterrestrial With disarming humor, Brother Guy and Father Paul explore these questions and over the course of six days of dialogue Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial will make you laugh, make you think, and make you reflect deeply on science, faith, and the nature of the universe.

    Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial will make you laugh, make you think, and make you reflect deeply on science, faith, and the nature of the universe Read Read less click to open popover Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial by Guy Consolmagno Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial will make you laugh, make you think, and make you reflect deeply on science, faith, and the nature of the universe Witty and thought provoking, two Vatican astronomers shed provocative light on some of the strange places where religion and science meet. Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial and Other Oct , Would you Baptize an Extra Terrestrial It is written by two Jesuits, one of whom is an astronomer and the other studies the history and philosophy of science So they are reasonable sources for commentary on the selected topics. WOULD YOU BAPTIZE AN EXTRATERRESTRIAL Catholic League Guy Consolmagno, S.J and Paul Mueller, S.J Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial and Other Questions from the Astronomers In Box at the Vatican Observatory New York Image, Science is God engaging with us Thus do Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno and Jesuit Father Paul Mueller Would you baptize an extraterrestrial News The Imagine, baptizing ET The authors point out that baptism should be a gift, not something imposed on others They would baptize an extraterrestrial if and only if he or she asked to be baptized The authors then examine how we do and how we should treat outsiders and strangers among us, echoing the point made by Pope Francis. Pope Francis Asked Would You Baptize an Alien Here s Science and religion share plenty of middle ground, according to two priests who have just penned a book called Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial due to hit bookstores in October. Would You Baptize an Extra terrestrial G Consolmagno Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial will make you laugh, make you think, and make you reflect deeply on science, faith, and the nature of the universe Guy Sj Consolmagno and Paul Sj Mueller P Random House Audio Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial and Other Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial and Other Questions from the Astronomer s In box at the Vatican Observatory . out of based on ratings reviews. Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial And Other Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial will make you laugh, make you think, and make you reflect deeply on science, faith, and the nature of the universe Product Identifiers ISBN ISBN eBay Product ID ePID Key Details Author Guy Consolmagno, Paul Mueller Number Of Pages pages. Would You Baptize an Alien Universal Life Church Although he does state he would never force baptism on an alien entity, he still implies that such a being needs to be baptized in the Christian tradition to atone for their sins.

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    About "Guy Consolmagno Paul Mueller"

      • Guy Consolmagno Paul Mueller

        American research astronomer and planetary scientist at the Vatican Observatory B.A and M.A at MIT, Ph.D at the University of Arizona s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, all in planetary science After postdoctoral research and teaching at Harvard College Observatory and MIT, in 1983 he joined the US Peace Corps to serve in Kenya for two years, teaching astronomy and physics After his return he took a position as Assistant Professor at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania.In 1989 he entered the Society of Jesus, and took vows as a brother in 1991 On entry into the order, he was assigned as an astronomer to the Vatican Observatory, where he also serves as curator of the Vatican Meteorite collection, positions he has held since then In addition to his continuing professional work in planetary science, he has also studied philosophy and theology source


    216 Comments

    1. Rereading for an upcoming book club. And loving it just as much the second time around.========This book is structured around a half dozen particular questions we've been asked time and again—questions that are interesting in themselves but that tend also to presuppose a conflict of some sort between religion and science.This intent leads to rich, interesting dialogues. I use the word dialogues intentionally because the book is structured as a conversation between the two authors who are astro [...]


    2. Clever, funny, creative, original, necessary work. The two authors explore a variety of questions at the crossroads of faith and reason. The dialogue format makes the book extremely readable and fast. I loved the analogy with a pointillist painting: if you look at reality only through the lense of science, you might as well look at the painting as a collection of dots. If you look at it through the lense of religion, you can see the meaning of the painting and the "bigger picture". Both views ca [...]


    3. 5 stars. Thank you, God, for the Jesuits. I want to give this book to every fundamentalist (both atheist and religious) and then beat them over the head with it. Science and religion are only in conflict if you let them be. They have not always been so. And BOTH sides are to blame: both religious fundamentalists who, for some reason, have stopped reading the Bible figuratively and atheist fundamentalists who likewise ignore the value that faith has for other people and group all people of faith [...]


    4. First of all, Jesuit Vatican Astronomers. Yes, that's a real thing. Second, I appreciate the attempt to ease the antagonism between faith and science. It doesn't work that well, but it's the thought that counts.Six questions are discussed by the two religious scientists. They're topics that kind of have one foot in the rational world and one in the ineffable. Big Bang vs. Genesis; Pluto's demotion (this one was a major stretch); The Galileo affair; The Star of Bethlehem; The end of the universe; [...]


    5. Very interesting - and stimulating reading for the openminded and intelligent reader. Certainly belongs to a very small but desperately needed genre, sophisticated religious books by practising scientists. What is outstanding in the topics covered is the exploration of the Galileo affair, sorely needed myth busting and important historical context is provided. The Best treatment of Galileo I have read. Challenges the pernicious growth of 'scientism' and also challenges the curious historical amn [...]


    6. For more than 10 years I reflect on the interaction between science and religion. I learn a lot with this book and this is the best review I can make. If you want to expand your horizons, read it too.


    7. I am not now nor have I ever been a scientist. This book is written by two Jesuit scientists, an astronomer and a physicist. They address some of the typical questions that are raised to foment discussion on faith and science: the Big Bang vs. Genesis, the Galileo affair, the end of the world, and, yes, intelligent life in the universe. Most of the science the authors' present is difficult but understandable if you take your time with it; I followed most of what was being discussed. The method u [...]


    8. A real interesting look at the false faith versus science debate. Laid out as a series of conversations around the world to a fictional Douglas Adam's restaurant. Well done.


    9. The book is well written and delves into 5 questions: The Big Bang and the Genesis, The fate of Pluto, What happened to Galileo, What was the star of Bethlehem and What's going to happen when the World ends. Ah, I almost forgot, in the last few pages it handles, not with the best solution in my opinion, the question of the what-if Baptism of the extraterrestrial.I got this book because I was writing a What-if collection, that may one day become something larger and the title of the book mislead [...]


    10. As someone who is not religious, but respects religion, I thought this book was pretty interesting. Hearing devoutly religious scientists discuss common "religion vs. science" questions allowed me to see things from a wider perspective. It hasn't exactly changed my mind about anything, but it's still neat to know the line of thinking of those I disagree with.


    11. Internally contradictory, full of special pleading and the like. In a nutshell, science does not know everything and the gaps can be filled with god. That each God contradicts the other God is never mentioned. What makes their God the special one?


    12. Brilliant, insightful A great overview of the purported problems between science and faith. I feel that I have a better understanding of Biblical interpretation in light of scientific discovery


    13. Well worth reading. A unique perspective from an astronomer who is a Jesuit brother and works for the Vatican Observatory. It's written as a dialogue between two Jesuit scientists. Witty and self-deprecating. As a Roman Catholic, I found it helpful.


    14. I enjoyed this look at answering questions scientifically and theologically. The authors frame each chapter as a conversation between the two of them in a different location (some real and some fictional) which makes the book interesting and easy to read. They explain the science (and its history) in an understandable way, and discuss the way the Catholic church and other Christian groups view the questions from a religious standpoint. Given their comparison between how scientific interpretation [...]


    15. If you have ever struggled to reconcile your faith with science - and by faith, I mean any religion at all - or if you are an atheist who wonders why highly educated people choose to believe in a higher power - then this book is for you. Its concepts do draw heavily on Christianity and Catholic tradition, but the general ideas are universal. Even if you are not interested in religion, the scientific explanations and anecdotes are highly interesting. The analogy of Pluto and the ugly duckling sum [...]


    16. The world is full of sure people.I don’t mean confident people.I mean sure people – sure they’re right and those that don’t agree with them are wrong.They know what is best. They know what is ‘the best’.They know where you should live, what you should wear, drive, read, watch, worship, love, hate, etc.I was more like that until someone made me unsure. In retrospect, they probably did me a favour, but it didn’t have to be so horrible. Ironically, they haven’t changed.I knew what w [...]


    17. Would you Baptize an Extraterrestrial? is a unique book in conversation style between two Jesuits, Brother Guy Consolmagno and Father Paul Mueller, who work on the research staff at the Vatican Observatory. The fact that the Vatican has an observatory is pretty awesome in and of itself. There are six conversations in all:1. Biblical Genesis or Scientific Big Bang?2. What Happened to Poor Pluto?3. What Really Happened to Galileo?4. What Was the Star of Bethlehem?5. What's Going to Happen When the [...]


    18. I love science and religion, therefore I thought reading Would you Baptize an Extraterrestrial would be a great extension of these two interests. You often hear in the media how these two do not mix. You even hear about the Catholic Church being at odds with science, but this is a false impression. Consolmagno and Mueller point out that “God wrote both books of Scripture and Nature and God does not disagree with himself. Truth Cannot Contradict Truth.” The title is certainly catching to the [...]


    19. This is my kind of book! A joy and a delight, if you have any interest at all in either science or theology. Two Jesuit astronomers from the Vatican observatory take their reader on a funny, brilliant whirlwind "tour": stops include Antarctica, the Chicago art institute, and the restaurant at the end of the Universe. On the way, they discuss knowledge, scientific theory, Galileo, Pluto, meteorites, ETs, and much more. These men are excellent teachers, especially Father Paul. Many years ago, the [...]


    20. **I received a review copy of this book from giveaways**Do you think that both science and faith should be taken seriously, but you struggle with how to hold science and faith together, with integrity? Do you find yourself tending to keep science and faith isolated from each other, in separate watertight compartments, but you wish that science and faith didn't have to "take turns" in your life? Then this book is for you. --from the IntroductionThat's the quote that the authors chose to feature [...]


    21. Why does the Vatican have an observatory? Can science and religion exist together? What really happened to Galileo? Does the Bible have anything to say about the Big Bang? Does science have anything to say about the Bible?And, oh yes, would you baptize an extraterrestrial?This is a very lively discussion, a dialog between two Jesuit scientists, a planetary scientist and a physicist, about Christianity, science, cosmology, conflicts and resonances between science and religion, and what questions [...]


    22. Like most Catholics (or Christians for that matter) I have heard the arguments on science vs. religion before which is why I was interested in this book. I might have wanted a way to show how religion is true and science can prove it when I started this book (which the authors warn against) and learned some interesting things (such as the Vatican has an observatory and astronomers! ;) ). The idea of using conversation style writing and locations was intriguing in the beginning and seemed like it [...]


    23. El tema de Ciencia y Fe, es entendido en la cultura popular como una lucha irreconciliable. Dentro de la Iglesia Católica, hay una clara relación entre ciencia y fe, donde una no sustituye a la otra, sino que cada una complementa a la otra en una mayor comprensión de la totalidad.Este libro es escrito por un Astrónomo y a la vez Sacerdote Jesuita, a través de un dialogo tratan de dar dar a conocer la relación entre ciencia y fe, como dos formas de comprender la realidad desde diferente asp [...]


    24. I'd probably give it 3.5 stars instead of 4 because it is in dialogue form.Science is forever changing. Our understanding of our faith is forever changing. It's a popular opinion that Christianity has been nullified or displaced because of science. These two Jesuits disagree. Those who wish to demean the faith will point to christian fundamentalists who take every line of the bible literally and say "See Christians believe the earth is only 4,000 years old." I believe that the Earth is over 4 bi [...]


    25. For centuries, it seems like science and religion have been battling each other for superiority. Which one is the final authority? What side do you choose? But what about this concept: science and religion are not adversaries, but companions working together to find the truth.Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial? is written by two Jesuits who do research at the Vatican Observatory (which I had no clue the Vatican had its own observatory). As the title suggests, the book looks into the silly que [...]


    26. This is a thoughtful, entertaining, and provocative book. I'd recommend it to anyone who has any interest in religion, science, or both. The title question was the final one in the book. The Vatican Observatory astronomers who wrote this book first discuss, in an engaging dialogue format, the apparent contradiction between the Biblical account of creation and the scientific Big Bang Theory, the status of Pluto, the true story of Galileo's heresy trial, the Star of Bethlehem, and the end of the u [...]


    27. What attracted me to this book is the title. It's a question that most of us don't think about, but which makes us think about the implications of faith and how it relates to matters of science. This book is a discourse on faith, theology, and science. The authors take what promised to be a dry and boring subject and brought it to life using humor to illustrate their point. Science and religion, they contend, are not at odds with each other, but instead complement each other. Science is not mean [...]


    28. Brother Guy Consolmagno and Father Paul Mueller hear questions like that all the time. They’re scientists at the Vatican Observatory, the official astronomical research institute of the Catholic Church. In Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial? they explore a variety of questions at the crossroads of faith and reason: How do you reconcile the The Big Bang with Genesis? Was the Star of Bethlehem just a pious religious story or an actual description of astronomical events? What really went down [...]


    29. A good witty discussion in dialogue form (like Galileo's writings) of the relationship between science (more specifically, astronomy/cosmology) and religion (specifically Christianity. specifically Roman Catholicism) . Interesting thoughts by two Jesuit scientists, written for people who are neither Christian fundamentalists nor Atheist fundamentalists. I liked the summary of the Galileo affair. Speaking as a Protestant, my only gripe is that sometimes when they say "Christian," they mean "Roman [...]


    30. This book, by an astronomer and a historian of Science who are both Jesuit, does a good job presenting a mainstream Catholic perspective on reconciling faith and science. My favorite part was the chapter that went into detail on the organizational and political maneuverings involved in recategorizing Pluto as a dwarf planet. Also notable is a fair but distinctly pro-Church account of the Galileo affair. The book is composed as a dialogue between the two authors, but they explicitly set out to av [...]


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