The Drowning of Arthur Braxton

The Drowning of Arthur Braxton

Caroline Smailes / Aug 20, 2019

The Drowning of Arthur Braxton An urban fairy tale from the acclaimed author of Reasons Why Arthur Braxton runs away from school He hides out in an abandoned building an old Edwardian bathhouse He discovers a naked woman swimmi

  • Title: The Drowning of Arthur Braxton
  • Author: Caroline Smailes
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 245
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • An urban fairy tale from the acclaimed author of 99 Reasons Why.Arthur Braxton runs away from school.He hides out in an abandoned building, an old Edwardian bathhouse.He discovers a naked woman swimming in the pool.From this point on, nothing will ever be the same.The Drowning of Arthur Braxton is an unflinching account of the pain and trauma of adolescence and of how firsAn urban fairy tale from the acclaimed author of 99 Reasons Why.Arthur Braxton runs away from school.He hides out in an abandoned building, an old Edwardian bathhouse.He discovers a naked woman swimming in the pool.From this point on, nothing will ever be the same.The Drowning of Arthur Braxton is an unflinching account of the pain and trauma of adolescence and of how first love can transform the most unhappy of lives into something miraculous It is a dark and brooding modern fairy tale from one of our most gifted writers.

    • ↠ The Drowning of Arthur Braxton || ✓ PDF Download by ☆ Caroline Smailes
      245 Caroline Smailes
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      Posted by:Caroline Smailes
      Published :2018-011-05T12:29:49+00:00

    About "Caroline Smailes"

      • Caroline Smailes

        Caroline Smailes Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Drowning of Arthur Braxton book, this is one of the most wanted Caroline Smailes author readers around the world.


    417 Comments

    1. After watching a YouTube video, I was dying to get a copy in my hands. I had really high hopes after hearing great things but after finishing the book, felt somewhat unsatisfied. In other words, my thirst for this book wasn't quite quenched. I enjoyed the first part of the book where we follow Laurel' s journey, warming slightly to her character. The reader then goes on to Arthur's story. This was when my avidity began to lessen. I found Arthur to be very much a stereotypical teenage boy. Althou [...]


    2. Okay so before this review gets complicated, its one of those books where you love itbut it is a little bit fucked up. You sort of think to yourself "am I allowed to like this book because its so messed up?", and my answer is yes, yes you can because this truly was a spectacular read!There's been so much buzz around this novel that I gave in and downloaded it from the Kindle store (mainly because I couldn't wait a few days to order the physical copy because I'm demanding and lazy-oops!). This bo [...]


    3. I’m between three and four stars. This was one weird book. But I kind of liked it. Actually I’m at a total loss, I’m going to have to think about it and mambo dogface for the banana patch



    4. Review by BethThis is a novel which will take your breath away and stay with you for a very long time. I finished it last week and I still keep bringing sections of it back and thinking about what could have been.Despite the title the novel is more than just Arthur’s story – it’s put together in layers and flips forwards and backwards in time giving the reader glimpses of the whole picture which is finally drawn both beautifully and tragically together at the end.All is not what it seems a [...]


    5. The Oracle is an old bathhouse in a northern seaside town, believed by the locals to have magical properties. Three 'water-healers' work there, and the book opens with the narrative of a teenage girl named Laurel, who has been employed there as an assistant-cum-receptionist. Some years later, a boy called Arthur Braxton breaks into the building - now dilapidated - while attempting to escape from a group of classmates who are bullying him, and meets a beautiful girl who is swimming in one of the [...]


    6. Truly a brilliant story that I would not hesitate giving 6/5 stars.If you are afraid of uncensored and brutal honesty, this book is not for you.It's a very different story from many I have read, where every page the events surprised me. There was not a single dull moment.Beginning with the point of view of Laurel, Smailes kicks off with an ordinary tale that quickly escalates, raising a lot of questions. Following with Arthur's perspective, I had a lot of fun, rejoicing in his excessive, but hum [...]


    7. I thought this book was amazing. There such a mix of themes here - coming of age, fairytales, magical realism. Smailes puts them all together in a way which means they aren't mismatched, and I instead it becomes a compelling, very Northern novel that I had to give five stars.It is about a boy called Arthur Braxton who one day finds a girl swimming in an abandoned pool, and that's all I'm going to say. It's one of those stories best gone into blind, because the more confused you are at the beginn [...]


    8. I just did not get this book. I loved the first part - Laurels story, but once we get to Arthur's story, I felt lost. It was like had been left behind whilst the story rambled on. I also hated Arthur. He is portrayed as a drippy, moany teenage boy who can only has one thing on his mind. As realistic as this may be, it does not make for a good protagonist in my opinion. I spent most the book wishing he'd just shut up. By the end of the book, I still felt like I had only been told half of the stor [...]


    9. Modern day tales of the complexities within dysfunctional families - the realities of love, life, death and sex - are entwined with the myths of ancient Greece in a story of love, loss, betrayal and redemption.


    10. This could have been such an eerie, climatic modern fairy tale about love and abuse. It could have been quoted as genius among those extraordinary that change the archetypes of literature. When I close my eyes I see the water oracle, hear the trills of magic Maddies voice, the splash of Delphina's performing her beautiful pirouettes. But sadly such a wasted potential.Let me use the fully allowed language of the author : Its utter fucked up twatting bollocks! Shocking, dark, hopeless, nerve - wra [...]



    11. The Drowning of Arthur Braxton by Caroline Smailes is published by The Friday Project on 11 April 2013. This is Caroline Smailes' sixth book. I've previously read a couple of her novels; In Search of Adam and Like Bees To Honey and although I enjoyed reading both of those, I think that The Drowning of Arthur Braxton is far and away her greatest story yet. Caroline Smailes' writing is unique, quirky and sometimes a little bit strange, her style can take some getting used to but she really is a mo [...]


    12. Okay so I originally picked up this book based purely on the fact that I'd seen Carrie Fletcher mentioning it on youtube and I thought the cover was gorgeous and it looked really dark and mysterious (don't think I even watched the review at the time, just ordered the book based on the cover cause I'm vain lol), so I had not read the blurb, I didn't know what genre this was, I had basically no expectations from this book at all. So this pleasantly surprised me in all ways possible and I can say i [...]


    13. Strong 3 1/2 stars. Heading towards four. Again I'm not really sure how to rate it. This book. When I picked up this book i was expecting a nitty gritty, concrete based novel grounded completely in a bleak and harsh reality. I expected a dark story and whilst all of these expectations were met I was also given so much more. This story is described on the back of the book as 'a dark and brooding modern fairy tale' and that is pretty much the perfect description of it. I'm not going to talk too mu [...]


    14. The only predictable thing about Caroline Smailes’ writing is that it’s unpredictable. She has such a wonderful wealth of imagination and this is evidenced by the diversity of her novels. I have already read and enjoyed Black Boxes and Like Bees to Honey (reviewed here ) but I think Arthur Braxton might be the one which brings her to a much wider audience.Why? Well, the story of Arthur B can be read on so many different levels. On the surface it’s an urban fairytale – young teenager, ali [...]


    15. I selected ths book after being introdced as a seond favorite on a youtube video. I saw all the reviews on and GoodReads and hardly any went below three stars; i thought i coulnt go wong with this book.I was ready to be open minded to the whole greek mythlogy thing but i felt as though i should have read up on it all before hand as i realy struggled to keep up.After getting a few chapters in, i was so confused with how awful the writing was and how lost i was that i had to check up online that [...]


    16. This was a bit of a Marmite book for me, there were parts I absolutely loved and other parts I didn't really enjoy at all. I really liked the narrative style of Laurel and Arthur. It was refreshing to hear young voices speaking so freely, although some readers might be offended by their use of strong language. I wasn't so keen on the story suddenly changing to script format. That didn't really work for me. I felt removed from the story, like I was watching a play rehearsal rather than reading a [...]


    17. There's clearly going to be a little bias when I talk about The Drowning of Arthur Braxton. It's written by Caroline Smailes, whom I co-wrote Freaks! with, and it's published by the magnificent Friday Project. But let's not talk about bias or let than get in the way of what is truly a remarkable and brilliant novel. I love Caroline's work (as you probably already know) and I think this is her best yet.It's a story of love and its power and it's the story of loss too. It's a fairy tale. It's hear [...]


    18. I so wanted to like this book. Word of mouth on Twitter and other social-network platforms was so good, I couldn't wait to get my hands on it. However, I just didn't get on with it. In fairness, I don't think I'm the target audience – I would say this is a book for young adults. I found it too long and a bit repetitive; also, with the exception of Laurel, the characters are not particularly engaging (indeed, some are downright annoying, like Kester and Pollock). Caroline Smailes does have an e [...]


    19. I was really looking forward to reading this and the premise sounded so interesting. But, after reading this, I won't recommend this. You would think that I might connect even a little bit to the main character and not think everything he says is offencive, stupid and obviously written by a writer who thinks teenagers are all stereotypes. And I didn't like the writing, for example you do not use "that's when I" three times in one paragraph, or two times in one sentance.Maybe it's just me, the pl [...]


    20. I feel like maybe I did something wrong when reading this book, because everyone else seems to have loved it! However, I felt that the author didn't explain everything at the end of the book. I still have a lot of questions that went unanswered and (unless this is to be the first book in a series) I think that shows poor writing. I guess I'm mostly just disapointed because up until the last 80 pages or so, I was really enjoying The Drowning of Arthur Braxton. All in all, I think it could have be [...]


    21. Something different. A modern myth or fairytale, very dark, very moving. The main character, Arthur, is a very real boy whose life has more than enough gritty realism to grind anyone down - and yet still he has hope and is drawn towards love and beauty and transformation. Bah, I can't describe it, any more than I could put it down. You'll just have to read it and see for yourself. You should.


    22. This book has helped me gain a new perspective on life and for that, I thank you Arthur Braxton.No doubt, it features some mature themes (rape, suicide, coerced sex) but at the heart of the story is about a boy dealing with adolescence, first love and heartache. A dark and gritty modern fairytale that takes the reader on an emotional roller coaster.No amount of words will do this beautiful story justice so I will just say one thing: READ IT!


    23. I barely enjoyed this book. A very repetitive piece of work that has largely only one setting, and the ramblings of teenagers. Don't get me wrong, there's obviously some beauty in the way teenagers see the world, but The Drowning of Arthur Braxton bypassed that. Also rather far fetched with no real need to be.


    24. I absolutely LOVED this book. This is a wonderful, sweary modern-day urban fairytale: there is the cruelty of dysfunctional families, neglected children and abusive relationships, but there is also the all-consuming joy of first love, kindness, humour, all seamlessly mixed in with myths and magic. Full review to follow.


    25. I found it an interesting reading, but I didn't quite enjoy being in his mind. He was very superficial and explicit, a bit rude and I disliked his way of thinking which made me dislike the story a bit. I like how it explored interesting and controversial themes, though. At the same time, I didn't quite get the ending too much, but that's part of the game.


    26. Such an amazing book. The mystery really drew me in. The characters feel so real & the storyline is really well though out. Always leaving you with a puzzle piece missing, so you want to read on. I also love that wvery character has it's own writing and language style!! I can only recommend it, really! Although you need to be a bit open minded as it has parts of fantasy in it.


    27. I`m so confused?I guess if you like one dimensional characters, prose switching to script format for no apparent reason and "twatting, cock, I sound so gay" being repeated a million times you`d give it five stars?


    28. In order to talkDoes it have to shock?This is bad.This is sad. Cause there is no hopeIn this fucking worldFor All Arthur Braxtons,SoShall I take the twatting ropeAnd piss offTo the otherworld?Because I am like him.RegardsReader


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