London Triptych

London Triptych

Jonathan Kemp / Aug 26, 2019

London Triptych London itself is as powerful a presence here as the three gay men whose lives it absorbs The Times Literary Supplement Vivid and visceral London Triptych cuts deep to reveal the hidden layers of a se

  • Title: London Triptych
  • Author: Jonathan Kemp
  • ISBN: 9781551525020
  • Page: 443
  • Format: Paperback
  • London itself is as powerful a presence here as the three gay men whose lives it absorbs The Times Literary Supplement Vivid and visceral, London Triptych cuts deep to reveal the hidden layers of a secret history Jake Arnott, author of The Long FirmRent boys, aristocrats, artists, and criminals populate this sweeping novel in which author Jonathan Kemp skillfully in London itself is as powerful a presence here as the three gay men whose lives it absorbs The Times Literary Supplement Vivid and visceral, London Triptych cuts deep to reveal the hidden layers of a secret history Jake Arnott, author of The Long FirmRent boys, aristocrats, artists, and criminals populate this sweeping novel in which author Jonathan Kemp skillfully interweaves the lives and loves of three very different men in gay London across the decades.In the 1890s, a young man named Jack apprentices as a rent boy and discovers a life of pleasure and excess that leads to new friendships, most notably with the soon to be infamous Oscar Wilde A century later in 1998, David tells his own tale of unashamed decadence from prison, recalling life as a young man arriving in the city in the mid 80s just as the scourge of AIDS hit Where their paths cross, in the politically sensitive 1950s, when gay men were the target of police and politicians alike, the artist Colin tentatively explores his sexuality while working on his painting London Triptych Moodily atmospheric and rich with history, London Triptych is a sexy, resplendent portrait of the politics and pleasures of queer life in one of the world s most fascinating cities.Jonathan Kemp lives in London, where he currently teaches creative writing at Birkbeck College London Triptych, his first novel, was published in the United Kingdom in 2010 and won the Authors Club Best First Novel Award.

    London Triptych by Jonathan Kemp Jan , London Triptych is a time spanning novel set in three time periods, the s, s and s The three narratives are separate stories but subtly intertwined. London Triptych Jonathan Kemp Moodily atmospheric and rich with history, London Triptych is a sexy, resplendent portrait of the politics and pleasures of queer life in one of the world s most fascinating cities Jonathan Kemp lives in London, where he currently teaches creative writing at Birkbeck College. Jonathan Kemp London Triptych London Fictions Jonathan Kemp London Triptych Suneel Mehmi Jonathan Kemp London is a centre and a focus for queer life and culture The three overlapping stories in London Triptych explore the queer subculture of London and its other world that is differentiated from the London Triptych Kindle edition by Jonathan Kemp Jonathan Kemp lives in London, where he currently teaches creative writing at Birkbeck College London Triptych, his first novel, was published in the United Kingdom in and won the Authors Club Best First Novel Award. London Triptych Home Facebook True to its title, this novel traffics in threes Alternating between three periods, with three main characters, it proceeds in chapters devoted to each. London Triptych Myriad Aug , London Triptych captures these political and emotional battles with a lyrical beauty and raw lucidity Hackney Citizen London Triptych might find itself nestled between other works of gay historical fiction on the bookshop shelves, but its central theme freedom and the pursuit of it london triptych eBay Find great deals on eBay for london triptych Shop with confidence. Triptych Glossary National Gallery, London A triptych is a painting made up of three sections Such constructions are usually made of two wings or shutters attached to either side of a central panel Sometimes the panels are hinged so that the wings can be closed to protect the major image painted in the middle.

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      • Jonathan Kemp

        Jonathan Kemp Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the London Triptych book, this is one of the most wanted Jonathan Kemp author readers around the world.


    854 Comments

    1. Never have I ever read a novel like this one, and never do I think I would ever again. The feeling upon trailing off from the last word and flipping the page - to discover it blank and cold - is akin to finishing The Secret History. If not for the intrinsic differences that lay in the heart of the books that separate them from each other, I would say that both books are similar; but they are fundamentally not, so I will stop going down this tempting path and strike one out of my own making.So. W [...]


    2. London Triptych is a time-spanning novel set in three time periods, the 1890’s, 1950’s and 1980’s. The three narratives are separate stories but subtly intertwined.In the 1890’s, Jack Rose starts his tuition as rent boy with Alfred Taylor and learns to love a life of sex and pleasure servicing his well heeled clients amongst the decadence and hidden world of homosexuality in Victorian London. He meets Oscar Wilde during his work and is interestingly brought into his relationships.In the [...]


    3. What can I say? It's just a beautiful piece of writing. When you read in reviews that each word is `carefully crafted' I think they must have been thinking about this work because I was taken by how many of the descriptions in the book are so well conveyed in a few short colourful intense words. I found myself writing them down which I rarely do as I didn't want to interrupt the narrative. The plot is well described by others so I won't repeat it but it's the sense of time and place which is so [...]



    4. Jonathan Kemp explores hungers we cannot explain and paints images not only intensely erotic, but tender. Here, in London Triptych, he shows us the unfolding of three men’s lives, each an unravelling ribbon, fluid, twisting, looking back upon itself. Their stories are confessionals, inviting us to enter the nocturnal, hidden recesses of the psyche. Meanwhile, London’s shadows and secrets echo those within our protagonists, and remind us that we readers, too, have our untold stories.Each of t [...]


    5. I really wanted to like this novel, which relates the story of three gay Londoners in 1894, 1954 and 1998 respectively, linked by the pleasures and perils of the capitol. But I just didn't. The problem is that the author, who wrote this while apparently completing his PhD in comparative literature, couldn't get out of his own way and prevent his academic work from getting in the way of his fiction. There is just too much delight in words for their own sake, which--especially in the case of the t [...]


    6. This was one of my 'to read' books and when I found it prominently placed in a Vancouver bookstore, I picked it up straight away. I'm so glad I did.Three tales are told in first person from three very different broken gay men. One lives in the latter part of the nineteenth century, another tells his life from the 1950's and the last from the final decades of the twentieth century. All live in London. All we can identify with.To say any more would spoil the wonderful journey I took with each of t [...]


    7. Jumping back and forth between three distinct narratives, this short novel explores the lives and loves of three gay men in London, decades apart. From Jack Rose, a rentboy in late Victorian times who gets caught up in the Oscar Wilde trials, via Colin, an aging artist infatuated with his model in the hostile climate of the 1950s, to David, who tells his story of sex trade and drugs while serving a prison sentence in the late 1990s, each of the stories captures what it was like to be a gay man i [...]


    8. London in the 1890s, 1950s and late 1990s is the setting for three interlaced tales about life for same sex desiring men. Jack in the “Gay 90s” is a “rent boy”, a teen prostitute whose livelihood brings him into contact with Oscar Wilde. Colin, an artist in gay paranoid 1954 finds a nude model’s seeming openness about his sexuality a challenge for his own closeted life. David in the 1980s, telling his story from prison a decade and more later chooses to throw his life in front of the A [...]


    9. This is Jonathan Kemp's debut novel and is a fascinating insight into gay history over the last 100 years. Whether you are straight or gay, it is an absorbing read. The characters are well-rounded human beings, with their strengths and imperfections. The book is set in London and links the lives of Jack from 1895, Colin in 1954, and David in 1998.Jack is a rent boy with few inhibitions. He lives a life of hedonism and adventurous sex, meeting men from all classes in suppressed Victorian society, [...]



    10. ‪If you’re writing a book with Oscar Wilde as a character, you’d better be witty or have balls. The balls of this guy must be viewable from orbit‬.


    11. The stories of three gay men 100 years apart are interwoven in this highly original debut novel. In the 1890s East End lad Jack Rose is taken on as an apprentice rent-boy by Alfred Taylor, the gay 'madam' whose evidence will help send Oscar Wilde to Reading Gaol. In the 1950s, with homosexuality still against the law, inhibited artist Colin develops a consuming passion for Gregory, the rent-boy who poses for him. In the 1990s David becomes infatuated with a fellow rent-boy who puts him on a road [...]


    12. leonelescota.wordpress/20"London Triptych," by Jonathan Kemp is my kind of book. It tells three subtly interwoven stories of male prostitutes from three generations: the 1890s, the 1950s, and the 1990s. These men are not shy about their sexual desires, and that could make for some fidgety reading from some circles. But it tells a certain kind of truth that may not exist anymore. These are from generations of men where there is still shame in what they desire, and nowadays in the age of marriage [...]


    13. This is a wonderful book. The three parallel stories, about gay men and sex in the City of London, are peopled by realistic human beings, brought to life by Kemp's spot-on writing. The three main characters, written in the first (and second!) person, not only go into great detail about their sexual activities with a trenchant truthfulness and lack of affectation but let us into their thoughts, hopes and fears with such honesty and candour that the reader cannot help but identify with them closel [...]


    14. Ik heb geen van de "50 shades of " gelezen en geen van de tv-programma's over seks gezien. Maar dat er een hype rond seks is, is wel duidelijk.Misschien past dit boek er wel in of juist niet ?!?De seks is maar een fais divers.Jonathan Kemp situeert zijn boek in Londen. Weliswaar in 3 verschillende tijdsperiodes : 1894, 1954 en 1998.Terugkerende thema's zijn jongensprostitutie, vriendschap, verliefdheid, liefde en bedrog.Jack Rose is prostitué in het huis van Alfred Taylor en leert zo Oscar Wi [...]


    15. Not since I first read Rupert Everett's excellent first memoir, 'Red Carpets and Other Banana Skins', have I encountered such a well captured and deeply resonant piece of writing about the city I live in.Because as Kemp states in the essay at the end of the book, London is as much a character in his triptych as the three men whose lives he interweaves, spanning years and political climates with remarkable fluidity and depth to the point where I felt I was recalling memories of my own as I read.I [...]


    16. Pretty obviously a first novel, since it's just a trilogy of loosely connected short stories; Kemp's innovation is to intersperse the three separate plots a few pages at a time throughout the book, which has the unfortunate effect of killing any narrative momentum and leaving the reader vaguely insulted that the author doesn't trust him to see the parallels between his distinct story lines. If you'd like to read this sort of meta-fiction done correctly, I suggest Michael Cunningham's "Specimen D [...]


    17. This is a great story, actually 3 stories that all happen in London about 50 years apart and overlap. Each involves a gay hustler and what it was like to live there in the late 1890's, 1950's and 1998. the first story is an imaginary hustler who is a "regular" of Oscar Wilde's and what its like to grow up dirt poor, hungry, but with something valuable you can trade on if you are young and cute. These stories aren't a series of happy endings but there are a lot of lessons learned. I especially li [...]


    18. Twentieth-century London; constantly evolving and never changing. Three gay Londoners tell their stories including the young rent-boy Rosy Jack in 1898, the repressed artist Colin in 1954 and the decadent jailbird David in 1998. Overlapping themes of love, pleasure, criminality and vulnerability trace each life and echo in each narrative.The London Triptych is a threefold drawing; it is a tri-perspective on London's gay underworld and those who occupy it. Beautiful observations linger, of those [...]


    19. OK, one more from my Major Gay Authors category. Kemp's book is NOT for most mainstream readers; he explores the dark underworld of rent-boys across three generations of London. 1895, the footloose Jack Rose will do anything (and anyone) to escape the grinding poverty of his East London slum, and discovers the far lusher life of serving as object of desire to lords, politicians, and even Oscar Wilde. By 1954, a severe crackdown has led to a far more closeted world, in which a budding painter's f [...]


    20. I enjoyed how this novel described the perspective of the rent boy from three different historical periods, and encourages the reader to see the connections between them. I thought the descriptions of the brothels, the Savoy and Wilde in the 1890s were all good, but just very occasionally, they did feel a little overdone at points.For me, the most appealing, and moving sections of this book, were those of that described the closeted painter, Colin Read in the 1950s, and his troubled relationship [...]


    21. The novel gives the reader three different main characters set in three very different time periods, the late 1890s, 1950s, and 1990s; all in gay London. We learn about their past, present and future, but I was left wishing that each of these characters had their own book in a trilogy, opposed to the triptych. The books approach to describing sex, and those who engage in it quite often, is rather frank. I couldn't tell if Kemp was trying to shock, titillate, or provoke the reader, but I assume i [...]


    22. Stories of three gay men in three different eras--1890s, 1950s and 1990s--that intersect vaguely and a little arbitrarily at a certain point. Two of the three are hustlers and the third is involved with one, but the sex, such as there is, is not graphic. What's most interesting is that probably the happiest and most liberated of the central characters is the one who lived in the era of greatest repression, the 1890s. Or maybe that's wrong. His story includes Oscar Wilde, whose demise is perhaps [...]


    23. c2010: FWFTB: Victorian, post-war, pre-2000, relationships, attitudes. I have no experiences to allow me to adequately connect with the actual story. In the words of Colin; "I am utterly ill-equipped for this." But, what I can say, is that the story telling and the writing style is exquisite. The author has included a chapter at the end explaining a bit of the story structure and influences and this helped to cement the book together in my mind. It is a quick and speedy read. Recommended to the [...]


    24. I read this for my F2F book group, and I'm not sure I would have finished it otherwise. The author seems more interested in providing a social history of three fairly random gay men -- two hustlers and a closeted artist, whose lives eventually intersect in small ways. The artist and the young boy who has sex with Oscar Wilde were the most fully realized characters -- I had a hard time caring about the modern-day character, who is telling the story of his life to an ex-lover. My biggest problem i [...]


    25. Wonderfully researched, compelling novel about male prostitution and homosexuality in London during three different eras. I especially enjoyed reading about the closeted artist in his 50s during the gay "witch hunts" of the 1950s who was so consumed by fear and a desire to please his parents, that he'd created a lonely life for himself built on lies. Incredibly sad and an important history to know about, especially for those of us who care about LGBTQ rights. I lived in London for seven years an [...]


    26. A book that is well crafted and beautifully written in places - it has clearly been put together with a lot of love and attention - so a shame it is wasted on three deeply narcissistic characters who are almost entirely defined by their sexual desires (whether or not they are acted upon) (they usually are). One clinically explicit scene follows another with little reason or development or character or story - even true love only seems to strike in the midst of an orgy or an acid trip. I stuck wi [...]


    27. Gorgeous evocation of changing gay identity over three distinct periods, focusing on three different characters in London: the time of Oscar Wilde, the 1960s and then the late 1990s. (I did find that the latter two periods are not as readily distinguishable from each other as they are from the Wilde period, and that the 1990s section seems the weakest or least impactful of the book). What I loved is that Kemp does not shy away from the pathetic, sordid and downright ugly sides of his characters [...]


    28. Fascinating three plot threads set in London, one in the 1890s, another 1950s, the third 1990s. Each centered on a rent boy, the 1890s story involving the Oscar Wilde debacle. Flawlessly written. Some might say this is a "gay book," but as a gay man I read a ton of "straight books" and have no trouble transitioning into that world, so if you're heterosexual try flexing your reading muscles. But be prepared for a little squalor. Think of the unpleasant (to our modern sensitivites) London depicted [...]


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