Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined

Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined

Scott Barry Kaufman / Sep 23, 2019

Ungifted Intelligence Redefined Child prodigies Gifted and Talented Programs Perfect s on the SAT Sometimes it feels like the world is conspiring to make the rest of us feel inadequate Those children tapped as possessing special

  • Title: Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined
  • Author: Scott Barry Kaufman
  • ISBN: 9780465025541
  • Page: 326
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Child prodigies Gifted and Talented Programs Perfect 2400s on the SAT Sometimes it feels like the world is conspiring to make the rest of us feel inadequate Those children tapped as possessing special abilities will go on to achieve great things, while the rest of us have little chance of realizing our dreams Right In Ungifted, cognitive psychologist Scott Barry KaufmChild prodigies Gifted and Talented Programs Perfect 2400s on the SAT Sometimes it feels like the world is conspiring to make the rest of us feel inadequate Those children tapped as possessing special abilities will go on to achieve great things, while the rest of us have little chance of realizing our dreams Right In Ungifted, cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman who was relegated to special education as a child sets out to show that the way we interpret traditional metrics of intelligence is misguided Kaufman explores the latest research in genetics and neuroscience, as well as evolutionary, developmental, social, positive, and cognitive psychology, to challenge the conventional wisdom about the childhood predictors of adult success He reveals that there are many paths to greatness, and argues for a holistic approach to achievement that takes into account each young person s personal goals, individual psychology, and developmental trajectory In so doing, he increases our appreciation for the intelligence and diverse strengths of prodigies, savants, and late bloomers, as well as those with dyslexia, autism, schizophrenia, and ADHD.Combining original research, anecdotes, and a singular compassion, Ungifted proves that anyone even those without readily observable gifts at any single moment in time can become great.

    Ungifted Intelligence Redefined by Scott Barry Kaufman Community Reviews Ungifted points out the issues with standardized IQ testing, and really any other comparative testing done to gauge intelligence The author starts each chapter with a personal story about his lifelong struggle to overcome being placed in remedial education, a struggle he does win by becoming a PhD. Ungifted Intelligence Redefined Scott Barry Kaufman This item Ungifted Intelligence Redefined by Scott Barry Kaufman Hardcover . Only left in stock order soon Sold by Elite Edu and ships from Fulfillment. Ungifted Scott Barry Kaufman Intelligence Redefined Combining original research and a singular compassion, Ungifted increases our appreciation for all different kinds of minds and ways of achieving both personally meaningful and publicly recognized forms of success. Ungifted Intelligence Redefined Scott Kaufman Google In so doing, he increases our appreciation for the intelligence and diverse strengths of prodigies, savants, and late bloomers, as well as those with dyslexia, autism, schizophrenia, and ADHD.Combining original research, anecdotes, and a singular compassion, Ungifted proves that anyone even those without readily observable gifts at any single moment in time can become great. Ungifted intelligence redefined Book, WorldCat Ungifted intelligence redefined Scott Barry Kaufman Questioning the childhood predictors of adult greatness, a cognitive psychologist, who was told as a child that he wasn t smart enough to graduate from high school, explores the latest research to Ungifted Intelligence Redefined Happy Brain Science Mar , What are intelligence, creativity, and talent How can we measure them Are they innate, or learned And how can we each uncover our own Scott Barry Kaufman tackles all of these important questions and many in Ungifted Intelligence Redefined. Ungifted Intelligence Redefined Audiobook by Scott Barry Feb , In Ungifted, cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman who was relegated to special education as a child sets out to show that the way we interpret traditional metrics of intelligence is Ungifted Intelligence Redefined The Creativity Post Ungifted includes my personal and scientific exploration of a broad range of research on the development of IQ, expertise, talent, and creativity My investigation spans genetics and neuroscience, as well as evolutionary, developmental, social, positive, and cognitive psychology. Ungifted Intelligence Redefined HuffPost Ungifted Intelligence Redefined Through many years searching for the truth about potential, I ve become convinced that it s time for a broadened conceptualization of human intelligence that takes into account each person s unique package of personal characteristics, passions, Scott Barry Kaufman Scott Barry Kaufman Kaufman is Scientific Director of The Imagination Institute in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania He is also co founder of The Creativity Post and author of Ungifted Intelligence Redefined Kaufman won the

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      Published :2018-011-09T08:06:29+00:00

    About "Scott Barry Kaufman"

      • Scott Barry Kaufman

        Scott Barry Kaufman is Scientific Director of The Imagination Institute in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania Kaufman investigates the measurement and development of intelligence, creativity, and personality see scientific papers He is author of Ungifted Intelligence Redefined and a forthcoming book on the science of creativity, co authored with Carolyn Gregoire Penguin, 2015 Kaufman is also host of The Psychology Podcast, co founder of The Creativity Post, and author of the column Beautiful Minds for Scientific American see articles Kaufman completed his doctorate in cognitive psychology from Yale University in 2009 and received his masters degree in experimental psychology from Cambridge University in 2005, where he was a Gates Cambridge Scholar.


    526 Comments

    1. curriculumoflove/It's a big book with more than one subtitle: Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined: The Truth About Talent, Practice, Creativity, and the Many Paths to Greatness by Scott Barry Kaufman.Kaufman tells a fascinating story about intelligence, weaving his own personal life story with both the history of the changing science and understanding of intelligence and the latest findings and speculations in the field. Kaufman was labeled learning disabled as a child, and became fascinated with u [...]


    2. This book has really redefined how I think about IQ. I loved all the history on how the IQ test was created and what other tests have added to the field. This is such a great holistic approach, without throwing out the baby with the bathwater. This book really focuses on how all the boxes we use to label and sort children can be a detriment. I could see all my kids in this book and my students. I love the focus, looking at more then IQ. So much more can be seen in tenacity, creativity and passio [...]


    3. This book is not just well researched and thorough, but surprisingly comforting.Kaufman shows that the fixed view of intelligence (ie, that you only have a certain amount of intelligence and there's nothing you can do to change it) many people have is not accurate. There are actually a variety of factors that influence what we see as intelligence, including opportunity, drive, and passion. He explains each of these variables in great detail, as well as how they relate to each other. He also give [...]


    4. I listened to the Audible book. Kaufman is an advocate for broadening the consideration of what is included in intelligence. Other factors which he wants to include are factors like motivation/passion, self-regulation, and openness to experience. Opportunities, support from mentors and positive feedback from the environment are stressed. His message is that we should focus on the strengths of students, and chart their progress, without comparison to other students. He writes about some education [...]


    5. A fascinating topic but sadly the delivery was very dry. Also, the author had a clear agenda to debunk IQ tests since he had not done well on them and yet succeeded nonetheless. While his determination was inspiring, his descriptions of studies and theories were not very compelling.


    6. Kaufman's book is technical and sometimes too full of irrelevant research, but overall, he presents a fabulous case of why we work toward helping children find their own meaning in education and should avoid labeling (and separating) children at all costs.He was labeled a special education student based on one IQ test and a slower work methodd it obviously affected his self-confidence as a young child. However, his book does a great job of detailing the history of the IQ test and how it has chan [...]


    7. I cannot praise this book enough. Kaufman does a wonderful job of dispelling the terribly myopic view of intelligence and standardized testing that people usually have. I would recommend this to anyone who is curious about what intelligence is, how it is measured and why we need to expand our current conception of it.


    8. In this book, Scott Kaufman leads on a fascinating journey through the science of intelligence, achievement and even greatness. I gave this book five stars because unlike other popular books on these topics, such as Daniel Coyle's 'The Talent Code' and Goeff Colvin's 'Talent is Overrated', Kaufman stays true to the science for the entire book. Kaufman is a graduate of both Cambridge and Yale, as well as a award-winning scientist, so perhaps it's unsurprising that Ungifted is epistemically superi [...]


    9. As a teacher of students identified as gifted my enjoyment and appreciation of a book title "Ungifted" may seem ironic. The children I teach are generally highly successful at playing the game of school. But some are not, including my own children. My oldest was very successful in public education until his sophomore year in high school when boredom and disinterest drove him to ignore his studies. He eventually, begrudgingly, rejoined the education game and is doing very well in college.My young [...]


    10. This book has a style that combines memoir with an extended academic paper. Each chapter starts with stories from Kaufman's remarkable path from special education to Yale researcher, and it adds a weight to his arguments as well as being a poignant story on it's own.I read the book from front-to-back, and I must admit that at times the number of papers, studies and researchers cited was eye-crossing for me, and I found myself getting lost in the details. That said, if you have any questions abou [...]


    11. The author, Kaufman has been through the childhood labelled as "kid of learning difficulty", he was back and forth receiving special kind of "education" and treated by teacher and classmates as "different". He decided to dig in to human mind and here is this very professional book with detailed study on the history of the development of IQ test. The methods and the definitions varied with the time as we get to know more and more of specific parts of brain functions. The book also mentioned does [...]


    12. Ungifted points out the issues with standardized IQ testing, and really any other comparative testing done to gauge intelligence. The author starts each chapter with a personal story about his lifelong struggle to overcome being placed in remedial education, a struggle he does win by becoming a PhD. These were very interesting interludes - makes me wonder if he has enough to put together a biography. Each chapter is really a survey of research on different aspect of intelligence and intelligence [...]


    13. I couldn't agree more with the writer and enjoyed every piece of the information. The traditional metrics for quantifying intelligence might not be the best way to nurture talents of a child. In this book, author Scott Barry Kaufman explained what we don’t know about intelligence and how we are almost destroying the true potential of our children by judging them according to some intelligence tests (I.Q, SAT and GRE tests).Every household has a slightly or a completely different developmental [...]


    14. Kaufman delivers a very in-depth overview of the field of intelligence, with focus on the idea of how intelligence is defined in different fields (mainly psychology and education). Although several chapters held my interest, quite a few go so far into the research base that it's easy to get a bit stifled by the sheer amount material and researchers cited (in those cases, I just skimmed ahead until I found something else I was captivated by). For example, I loved getting his take on mindsets and [...]


    15. I must admit that I did not finish this book, only got about 2/3 way through. It was so well researched that for the casual reader (me) it was a bit too dense. The author's personal story about how he overcame having been labeled "slow" in elementary school was inspiring but the in depth explanations of testing methods just weren't that interesting to me. That said, this is a colossal work, with the author obviously incredibly dedicated to bringing to light the gaps left by all kinds of intellig [...]


    16. Too often in education, I run into the mindset that "Special Education" is code for lower expectations. I loved that the author shared his own experience of being in Special Education and the impact it had on him throughout this densly packed book about what intelligence is, how we measure it, and how that has historically played out in education.


    17. This read like a revenge piece. The author comes off like a bratty little boy who didn't like that he wasn't given the "gifted" label. So what?


    18. This book is both uplifting and sad. Its primary premise is delightful to hear in a book on education and intelligence, and yet sad because it's one you would think we wouldn't have to articulate: "we can recognize and value every kind of mind without diminishing the value of others. I don't see intelligence as a zero-sum game: just because someone is talented (whatever that means) by the standards set by society doesn't mean that the person who isn't doesn't have dynamic potential for intellect [...]


    19. An important book that started off slow reading, chronicling the IQ test: how it started, what it proved and didn't prove, why it often was turned into a self-fulfilling prophecy, why it didn't correlate with later life success, etc In later chapters, I thought it became fascinating as researchers tried to discover what traits or talents predicted later life success and mastery, how we judge children unfairly by not crediting creativity, the arts, and subjects not covered by IQ tests. It was ver [...]


    20. Good book. Listened to audiobook. Well done and some good thoughts. It got a little wonky at times. General idea is that we don't necessarily have a good way to evaluate someone's true intelligence and ability to succeed just based on standard metrics.



    21. I enjoyed this a lot. The middle of the book was the most interesting, while the start and conclusion lacked a bit. Will have to read it again, and hope to read more of Mr. Kaufman.


    22. I listened to the audiobook which made it very difficult to follow all that was being said. I'm sure I would have enjoyed it more if I would have been able to take time and read it more slowly.


    23. For anyone who is interested in the history surrounding our methods of classifying and defining intelligence, this is the book for you. What makes someone smart? Why have traditional measurements of intelligence ignored other important areas like artistic, social and emotional intelligence?Parts of this book excited me: some of the research into motivation, grit, and determination and how those traits correlate with traditional measurements of intelligence; the broadening of some researchers' de [...]


    24. I think Kaufman makes the highly academic very accessible and relatable in this book. Not, surprising given his documented experiences and his own theory of intelligence. A decent read and some good food for thought.


    25. Let me start off by saying that this book is something that every educator, administrator and parent should read. I've always kind of felt the same way as the author, I just don't have the research or education to back it up and that is: we all have our own intelligences. Since the beginning of the 1900s the word Intelligence has been linked to the IQ score. As I've grown older, I've come across many people who probably didn't do well in school, probably didn't get labeles with a high IQ score, [...]


    26. The introduction and first chapters of the book set up an interesting value proposition: that human intellectual ability is a multidimensional phenomenon and there are better ways to measure them than standard IQ tests. Everyone who's interested in HRM or, say, education can readily appreciate the value of new means to better assess and amplify the abilities of pupils and (prospective) colleagues. Naturally, such a book would start with critique towards established ability measurement systems. A [...]


    27. This book is like taking a class on intelligence. The author recently completed his PHD and gives an extensive lit review of the topic as only a recent doctoral student can, the book was useful just for that fact. After reading this book I feel like I am very up to date on where the field of psychology stands regarding intelligence. Lit review aside his final chapter reaches a profound point, that intelligence is far broader than an iq score or a gpa. It even goes beyond our career and social su [...]


    28. I really enjoyed getting a glimpse into how the author was feeling as he experienced school. It was insightful to understand how people learn differently and challenging to think about how we define intelligence currently is rather limiting. I appreciated his hypothesis at the end of the book and the notion that there are many different types of intelligences. I hope the theory "catches on" and therefore has a positive impact on how "school" is conceived. I was a little disappointed at the balan [...]


    29. There aren't enough stars to rate this book. It is so full of incredible information that I read it three times. To begin, the book is an engaging narrative about the author's life. Mr. Kaufman went from being excluded by an educational system supposedly designed to help children to becoming an authority on the subject of intelligence. Especially noteworthy is his unique insight into what other academics only theorize about. Then there is the fact that the book is an exhaustive review of the evo [...]


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