Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony

Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony

Lewis Thomas / May 20, 2019

Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler s Ninth Symphony This magnificent collection of essays by scientist and National Book Award winning writer Lewis Thomas remains startlingly relevant for today s world Luminous witty and provocative the essays addre

  • Title: Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony
  • Author: Lewis Thomas
  • ISBN: 9780140243284
  • Page: 392
  • Format: Paperback
  • This magnificent collection of essays by scientist and National Book Award winning writer Lewis Thomas remains startlingly relevant for today s world Luminous, witty, and provocative, the essays address such topics as The Attic of the Brain, Falsity and Failure, Altruism, and the effects of the federal government s virtual abandonment of support for basic scientiThis magnificent collection of essays by scientist and National Book Award winning writer Lewis Thomas remains startlingly relevant for today s world Luminous, witty, and provocative, the essays address such topics as The Attic of the Brain, Falsity and Failure, Altruism, and the effects of the federal government s virtual abandonment of support for basic scientific research will have on medicine and science Profoundly and powerfully, Thomas questions the folly of nuclear weaponry, showing that t brainpower and money spent on this endeavor are needed much urgently for the basic science we have abandoned and that even medicine s most advanced procedures would be useless or insufficient in the face of the smallest nuclear detonation And in the title essay, he addresses himself with terrifying poignancy to the question of what it is like to be young in the nuclear age.

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    • Unlimited [Memoir Book] ↠ Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony - by Lewis Thomas ✓
      392 Lewis Thomas
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Memoir Book] ↠ Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony - by Lewis Thomas ✓
      Posted by:Lewis Thomas
      Published :2018-011-26T08:00:34+00:00

    About "Lewis Thomas"

      • Lewis Thomas

        Lewis Thomas November 25, 1913 December 3, 1993 was a physician, poet, etymologist, essayist, administrator, educator, policy advisor, and researcher.Thomas was born in Flushing, New York and attended Princeton University and Harvard Medical School He became Dean of Yale Medical School and New York University School of Medicine, and President of Memorial Sloan Kettering Institute His formative years as an independent medical researcher were at Tulane University School of Medicine.He was invited to write regular essays in the New England Journal of Medicine, and won a National Book Award for the 1974 collection of those essays, The Lives of a Cell Notes of a Biology Watcher He also won a Christopher Award for this book Two other collections of essays from NEJM and other sources are The Medusa and the Snail and Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler s Ninth Symphony His autobiography, The Youngest Science Notes of a Medicine Watcher is a record of a century of medicine and the changes which occurred in it He also published a book on etymology entitled Et Cetera, Et Cetera, poems, and numerous scientific papers.Many of his essays discuss relationships among ideas or concepts using etymology as a starting point Others concern the cultural implications of scientific discoveries and the growing awareness of ecology In his essay on Mahler s Ninth Symphony, Thomas addresses the anxieties produced by the development of nuclear weapons 1 Thomas is often quoted, given his notably eclectic interests and superlative prose style.The Lewis Thomas Prize is awarded annually by The Rockefeller University to a scientist for artistic achievement.


    209 Comments

    1. "Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony" is the title and the last chapter of the book, which contains 24 short, non-fiction essays. Lewis Thomas, a scientist and a medical doctor, especially emphasizes the relationship between science and humanity as well as the destructive power of science in the invention of nuclear weapon. Throughout the book he discusses humanity from different angles, and a nuclear war, obviously linked to the Cold War because the book was published in [...]


    2. I first read Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony in high school. Thomas was a medical doctor, cancer researcher, and contributor of short essays about medicine and science to the New England Journal of Medicine and other publications. This included some of those, but also had other essays about nuclear war and the arts and humanities. It is in some ways a period peace as during the mid 1980s Thomas was seriously worried about the prospect of nuclear annihilation at the ha [...]


    3. Por lo visto no aprendo. A pesar de que el anterior (y único hasta ahora) libro del autor no me gustó nada, como me compré dos en el VIPS tenía que leerlo. No es que el libro sea malo. Pero trata temas que no me interesan. No son grandes logros científicos, ni puntos de vista que hagan pensar, ni asuntos que conciernan a todo el mundo. Es como pedirle a un oficinista gris que escriba su opinión sobre la tecnología y publicarla. No sería interesante.


    4. I recently read this collection of essays while listening to David Sedaris's newest essay collection, When You are Engulfed in Flames. While the two books are nothing alike, I enjoyed them both. Thomas obviously loves language and science. His love of science can actually make a reader lament not pursuing science. I am making it a poing to pick up more of Thomas's work. I originally, like my friends LeAnn and Chris, read this book for a high school class. It remains a good read today.


    5. I read this in high school. Thomas was a medical doctor, cancer researcher, and contributor of short essays about medicine and science to the New England Journal of Medicine and other publications. This included some of those, but also had other essays about nuclear war and the arts and humanities. An beautifully written book. Thomas' work is one of the reasons I enjoy the essay so much as a literary genre.


    6. This book of essays published in 1983 is a series of meditations on science, philosophy, and art and is surprisingly prescient. so much of what he discussed is relevant to today. I was very happy to have read this. Actually I picked it out of my shelves because the 9th is special to me (The Resurrection Symphony).


    7. This is an insightful series of essays ranging from the deadly serious opener, "The Unforgettable Fire", to the tongue-in-cheek "On Smell", to the exhortative "The Problem of Dementia". Thomas discusses biomedical science, thermonuclear weapons, the evolution of language, and much in between. While some of his essays feel dated, the issues and ideas are still largely relevant in 2014.


    8. An enjoyable read written by a man who likes to think. And better still, he thinks at an analog speed, if you know what I mean. A refreshing phenomenon in the midst of the nanosecond internet digi-world.


    9. I read this first in the early 80's and just re-read it. While a few essays are out-dated, others have one wondering how he could read the future as clearly as he did, and seem more urgent now than ever.


    10. I read this book in my early 20's, and it created quite an impression, because I'm almost 50 and still it comes to mind when I list, in my head, books I've read. I'd like to find a copy and re read it.


    11. The essay on "Altruism" was my first real introduction to sociobiology. It was a personal moment of epiphany for which I will always be grateful.



    12. Well -- that didn't work -- read this one as it was a reading list selection for CR -- as usual a good experience.


    13. One of the most thought-provoking collections of essays I've ever read. The title essay, in particular, is frightening and compelling.


    14. I have owned this book for two decades, and its essays certainly touch upon several of the key insights that I have championed through most of my professional life. 1) Thomas argues strenuously and earnestly that nuclear weapons research and development was/is a fool's errand - with every dollar thus invested in enhancing "national security," our actual state of insecurity is the only thing that increases. 2) He rails against the hegemony of quantification as the too-fashionable signifier of "un [...]


    15. This collection is notable for its repeated laments of the insanity of nuclear arsenals--and the Cold War, though I agree with the book's cover that Thomas's essays remain relevant now. This adds a note of righteous rage. But the overall emphasis is still on embracing ambiguity, accepting bewilderment, and even on starting the teaching of science by showing what we are most ignorant of. But still, there is also the defense of the scientific method, or at least the quest for good answers, and new [...]


    16. This series of essays is like a time capsule, looking back at science, technology, and more importantly, the fear of thermonuclear warfare that defined his time. Thomas is an easy-to-read science essayist, and does a great job writing about the culture of science, even thirty-ish years later. I highly recommend if you can find this!



    17. Fascinating, but ultimately depressing. The threat of all-out-nuclear war that hangs over this book is terrifying, but feels relevant in this day and age.


    18. "This magnificent third collection of essays by Lewis Thomas will both reassure and surprise his many devoted readers. Among its luminous and witty pieces, enthusiasts will applaud 'The Attic of the Brain,' 'Falsity and Failure,' 'On Smell,' a three-page masterpiece on 'Altruism,' as well as many other 'notes of a biology watcher.'"In further, even more provocative essays, Dr. Thomas explores the federal government's virtual abandonment of support for basic scientific research, and suggests the [...]


    19. I have never read essays on science before, but I thoroughly enjoyed Thomas's prose. Thomas principally focuses on war, science, and art, as his subjects. His views are deeply humanitarian, exuberant on education, and a little naive. I felt that this book clearly showed as a product of its time, given Thomas's frequently voiced fear on the devastation possible to come from nuculear war. Despite this period specificness, some of his phrases are still worth considering:"Carved in the stone of the [...]


    20. The chloroplasts in today's green plants, which capitalize on the sun's energy to produce the oxygen in the atmosphere, are the lineal descendants of ancient blue-green algae. The mitochondria in all our cells, which utilizes the oxygen for storing energy from plant food, are the progeny of ancient oxidative bacteria. Collectively, we are still, in a fundamental sense, a tissue of microbial organisms living off the sun, decorated and ornamented these days by the elaborate architectural structure [...]


    21. Physician Thomas was a bit of a science popularizer, with a penchant for reflecting on the connections between the "hard" and the "soft" sciences. Many of the essays in this 1983 collection seem to wend themselves to the theme of the madness of mutually assured destruction via nuclear war; it reflects the Cold War context of the book but is not really dated, since the threat of warfare persists with the ceaseless proliferation of rivalries. Thomas connects a lot of dots in exploring our curious [...]


    22. as always, thomas writes beautifully, and the range of subjects -- not to mention his depth of insight -- put your mind at work. there's maybe a little too much about nuclear war, but given when these essays were written, that makes sense, and it essentially makes for a slightly outdated but interesting historical document. then again, there are plenty of sections not about nuclear war, which are more or less timeless.


    23. Lewis Thomas was a multi-talented physician, poet, and science popularized. This book is wide-ranging collection of essays, mostly about the relationship between the "hard" and "soft" sciences. Although some of the themes are a bit dated (several were focused on the dangers of the nuclear arms race rampant in the early 80s when this was written) most are more timeless.


    24. A little dated, as this is written by 1983. The situations are progressed in time now, somewhat. For example: though global warming is now a major front line issue; it was then considered something that will be front line in the future.Otherwise, this is a major thought-provoking book of essays.


    25. He had some interesting ideas, but he didn't flesh them out or include any research on them, which drove me crazy. I felt like he thought that since he is a scientist his ideas are better or so original. At least the book wasn't hard to read.


    26. I like how L. Thomas combines aspects of the humanities (poetry and such) with science (biology). I love how he's so poetic at times. His commentary on bombs and the Soviet Union got kinda old though, since I'm reading this in 2013.




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