This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information

This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information

Andy Greenberg / Jul 16, 2019

This Machine Kills Secrets How WikiLeakers Cypherpunks and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World s Information At last the first full account of the cypherpunks who aim to free the world s institutional secrets by Forbes journalist Andy Greenberg who has traced their shadowy history from the cryptography rev

  • Title: This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information
  • Author: Andy Greenberg
  • ISBN: 9780525953203
  • Page: 430
  • Format: Hardcover
  • At last, the first full account of the cypherpunks who aim to free the world s institutional secrets, by Forbes journalist Andy Greenberg who has traced their shadowy history from the cryptography revolution of the 1970s to Wikileaks founding hacker Julian Assange, Anonymous, and beyond WikiLeaks brought to light a new form of whistleblowing, using powerful cryptographicAt last, the first full account of the cypherpunks who aim to free the world s institutional secrets, by Forbes journalist Andy Greenberg who has traced their shadowy history from the cryptography revolution of the 1970s to Wikileaks founding hacker Julian Assange, Anonymous, and beyond WikiLeaks brought to light a new form of whistleblowing, using powerful cryptographic code to hide leakers identities while they spill the private data of government agencies and corporations But that technology has been evolving for decades in the hands of hackers and radical activists, from the libertarian enclaves of Northern California to Berlin to the Balkans And the secret killing machine continues to evolve beyond WikiLeaks, as a movement of hacktivists aims to obliterate the world s institutional secrecy.This is the story of the code and the characters idealists, anarchists, extremists who are transforming the next generation s notion of what activism can be.With unrivaled access to such major players as Julian Assange, Daniel Domscheit Berg, and WikiLeaks shadowy engineer known as the Architect, never before interviewed, reporter Andy Greenberg unveils the world of politically motivated hackers who they are and how they operate.

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    • ↠ This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information || ↠ PDF Read by ↠ Andy Greenberg
      430 Andy Greenberg
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information || ↠ PDF Read by ↠ Andy Greenberg
      Posted by:Andy Greenberg
      Published :2018-011-20T16:46:51+00:00

    About "Andy Greenberg"

      • Andy Greenberg

        ANDY GREENBERG is a staff writer for Forbes magazine, focusing on technology He lives in New York City His story on Julian Assange, based on one of only two extensive interviews Assange had given at the time, was on the cover of Forbes in the summer of 2010.


    503 Comments

    1. This book was published in 2012 but still feels up to date in 2016. Andy Greenberg has created a masterful work of both journalism and storytelling. I found the book a complete pleasure to read. The early part describes Ellsberg, the most prolific state leaker of the Kissinger era, who had to spend over a year bringing papers out of his office, photocopying them, returning them and removing sensitive details in the copies before parting with them. This is contrasted with the presumed copying and [...]


    2. Because I know the author, I've read the book nearly through twice. As enjoyable as it was in the beginning biographies, I was delighted that the last 10% of the story gets MUCH more dramatic & compelling.Despite the accurate & journalistic tone, Greenberg managed to gracefully incorporate foreshadowing & dark irony at the book's end. He deliberately shows that secrecy is even destructive to organizations dedicated to abolish it (when they insist on living in anonymity & deep sec [...]


    3. He had me at "lattice-based homomorphic cryptography." While this book exists because its author to a chance to interview Julian Assange just before he became a figure of international notoriety, it is not really a history of Wikileaks. Instead, it's looking at the relationship between anonymity and the exposure of sensitive information, an issue that has a surprisingly rich and fraught history in the technology world. When Greenberg first launches into an explanation of the math behind various [...]


    4. By Andy Greenberg. Grade: B+WHAT IS THE MACHINE THAT KILLS SECRETS? WikiLeaks brought to light a new form of whistle-blowing, using powerful cryptographic code to hide leakers’ identities while they spill the private data of government agencies and corporations. But that technology has been evolving for decades in the hands of hackers and radical activists, from the libertarian enclaves of Northern California to Berlin to the Balkans. And the secret-killing machine continues to evolve beyond W [...]


    5. First thing out the gate: I'm not expert enough to comment on all of the facts presented in this book, and it's possible that some have been indulged or stretched a bit. It's well cited, and Greenberg's a good journalist, but you never know.That said, this was one of the best paced and most exciting tech journalism books I remember reading. It really recalls the seminal Steven Levy stuff, like "Hackers" and "Crypto," but working with characters that many people will recognize from the news. (Or [...]


    6. Suspenseful, inspiring, humorous, and overall just a fantastic job of journalistic storytelling. I started quite a few books related to questions of democracy and technology, and specifically hacker culture, all at the same time, and this one is easily the best. Greenberg takes technological and political issues of great complexity - not to mention delicate personal relationships, such as that between Julian Assange and former Wikileaks staffers - and provides the perfect amount of context, expl [...]


    7. Andy gives us a behind the scenes look at the implosion of wikileaks and the intriguing history of leaks and whistle-blowers. A must read for anyone interested in the darker side of the internet and how it can be used to spread transparency and chaos.


    8. I read this book on my flight back to England (the second one, since I missed the first one by that much). The plane is one of those newer models that has entertainment units in the back of every seat, and to my surprise they had different movies on offer from those available when I flew back to Canada a few weeks ago. One of those movies was The Fifth Estate, which also tells the story of Julian Assange and WikiLeaks. So this review will also be a bit of a review of that movie. But I’ll save [...]


    9. Greenberg creates a series of intriguing character sketches which converge at various points throughout modern hacker history. This character-based approach to telling this very timely narrative is what makes it rich and engaging, and makes the current debate about the ethics of leaking so humanly complex. If you start this book ambivalent about how you feel about organizations like Wikileaks and Anonymous, this isn't likely to clarify anything for you. But it will reveal the many layers of mora [...]


    10. Свобода, повече свобода, отколкото можем да понесем: knigolandiafo/book-review/w“Уикилийкс – машината, която убива тайни” е за света на освободената информация това, което е “Големият залог” на Майкъл Луис за кризата – книга за хората, не просто описание на задвижените и видимо невъ [...]


    11. Truly fantastic book by a thorough, careful and yet non-boring journalist who also happens to be a consummate storyteller. The absolutely spiffing quality of the editing on top of Greenberg's lively and inventive use of language makes it a good read even separate from the subject matter, but when you have even a passing interest in the themes of privacy, governmental transparency, institutionalised secret-keeping, anonymity, intellectual property or Internet security, this book is one you simply [...]


    12. Interesting journalism piece on the history of WikiLeaks and the technologies around anonymous whistle-blowing in the technology age.


    13. Interesting read, and now I'm sure I'm on some list somewhere for even saying I read this book, but then I was probably already on the list a other reasons. ;-)As for the book, it was an interesting overview to the people who took Wiki Leaks from a fledgling website that no one heard during it s early years, to one that gets mentioned in the national/global press about once a month. Well, at least it use to get mentioned about once a month, these days its about once a quarter.This book takes the [...]


    14. This book started out extremely promising. It talked about Leakers, how leaks happen, and the hurdles to leaking. It breifly went over how much easier Bradley Manning leaked his trove of documents compared to Daniel Ellsberg, and the troubles that both of them faced. However, this book took a turn for the worst when it started talking about Julian Assange. The book put too much focus on him and very quickly got caught up in the nuances of WikiLeaks and the drama it faced. The book became very te [...]


    15. It describe the world of how WikiLeaks and the internet anonymity movement started. I found it informative with good narrative. It tells the story of Cypherpunks, hack geeks and how PGP, tor idea came to live. The ideas of several individual and their obsession with privacy, anonymity, and non censorship. What are the main idea about mixer algorithms to hide traffic and the multiple layer of encryption that Tor use. The story then move to Wikileak earlier days and Julian Assange early life. Late [...]


    16. It had some interesting parts, but the irritating cadence of the audiobook reader, the overly-technical descriptions in some places, and the libertarian viewpoints of the hackers left me mostly underwhelmed.


    17. Wow, I loved this book. It pulled together many of the stories I already knew about Wikileaks, cypherpunks and Anonymous into a one cohesive tale about the paradox of anonymity as a prerequisite for transparency : ‘ man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask and he’ll tell you the truth’ (that’s an Oscar Wilde quote, used in the book, that so aptly captures much its essence).Another favorite quote, by Joe Lieberman, re government overreaction to the threat of l [...]


    18. Not as enjoyable to read as the Dark Net, but very informative. My notes, some of which is not directly quoted from the text. Black Hats - hackers who engage in usually illegal tactics of intrusion or destructive hacking. Communications Protocol - is a system of rules that allow two or more entities of a communications system to transmit information via any kind of variation of a physical quantity. These are the rules or standard that defines the syntax, semantics and synchronization of communic [...]


    19. I had loosely followed news media reports of the tornado surrounding WikiLeaks and its exposés. My main questions were: 1. WikiLeaks was allegedly run by a multi-member organisation. So why was Julian Assange being specifically targeted by the US government, when there were others involved? 2. Why had WikiLeaks decided to release unredacted State Department Cables, when it was obvious that the backlash would be severe and uncompromising? I watched the movie, The Fifth Estate, which answered the [...]


    20. The World's Secrets ReleasedIn the book This Machine Kills Secrets by Andy Greenberg the author explains how classified company and government files are shared to the public. The book is not one long story instead it is more like a very long research paper. Throughout the book Andy Greenberg meets and interviews various hackers and hacking groups. I would recommend that you do read the book This Machine Kills Secrets by Andy Greenberg because it is nonfiction, interesting, and because it is atte [...]


    21. A fascinating look at the rise and fall of WikiLeaks and its copycats. The covers a lot more than just WikiLeaks. It also is about disclosing secrets since Daniel Ellsberg in the 1970s. But the pivot is WikiLeaks. Greenberg has an exceptional writing style that makes a complicated subject more accessible to lay audiences. His focus is on people rather than technology. Consequently, the book reads more like a series of biographies that eventually interconnect. The result is informative.Greenberg [...]


    22. This journalistic style book takes an in-depth look at the secrets that the government keeps and the people who have tried to uncover and spill those secrets to the rest of the world. From Daniel Ellsberg who told the public about questionable practices and motives associated with the Vietnam war to the relationship forged by Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning and Julian Assange that brought about Wikileaks, to the birth of Anonymous-- these pages are filled with power struggles, good intentions gone [...]


    23. "Despite the jacket blurb’s claim that This Machine Kills Secrets is the “story of a revolution dramatized in the movie The Fifth Estate,” it in fact offers a more expansive history of the technological side of the American quest for government transparency and accountability, including introductions to the major players in that quest. Far more is covered than Julian Assange and WikiLeaks; the book begins with Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers in the 1970s and ends with an afterword [...]


    24. My review from Woodridge Book Talk.“This machine kills secrets” is a riff on Woody Guthrie’s slogan “this machine kills fascists.” Greenberg lays out how cryptography and anonymity are the machine that can help people leak secrets that those in power don’t want the public to know. The best example of this idea is Wikileaks where thousands of classified documents were posted for public consumption. Greenberg goes back to Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers where the leaking techno [...]


    25. The book I read to research this post was This Machine Kills Secrets which is one of the best books I have read connected to computing and which I bought from a local bookstore. This book is about the emergence of websites like Wikileaks and how hackers and cypherpunks have released lots of secret information into the public domain. Even the Russian Mafia haven't been safe from these disclosures which have been on a worldwide scale. Julian Assange one of the founders of Wikileaks is one of the b [...]


    26. Can I even count that I read this book? I admit that I am feeling a little obsessed with reading as many books as I possibly can, especially these audio books on my ipod from Jerren, which I attempt to pay attention to while doing lots of brainless tasks at work. Hearing so much about computer encryption and technology was often above me and my mind would drift away. There was a lot of information about the relationships between the hackers and hacktivists, their life stories and why they were d [...]


    27. This was a fascinating look at the personalities and social forces that brought us wikileaks and its various imitators. Through extensive interviews and close readings of archived chat logs, Greenberg reveals a transcontinental sub-culture of cypers and hactivists – many with troubled childhoods -- who have built the essential architecture for a self-replicating system of anonymous leak portals, and in so doing have called into question the very idea of institutional secrecy.How did a rag-tag [...]


    28. Short review: ignore the movie, read the book.Longer review: This book really benefits from the author’s personal travels and one-on-one interviews with the multi-generational cast of characters involved (and the 20-plus-person descriptive list, at the beginning of the book, definitely aids in keeping track while reading). Greenberg obviously did a ton of research in order to write this overview of politically-informed cryptography and whistleblowing, covering the 1970s onward, and managed to [...]


    29. Greenberg starts out this entertaining read with a comparison of two whistleblowers: Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers, and Bradley Manning, who leaked the State Department cables. He then moves on to compare and contrast various cryptographers, cypherpunks, and hackers whose anti-authoritarian goal has been to increase individual privacy on the Internet while at the same time exposing the secrets of governments and businesses, particularly those governments who claim to be democra [...]


    30. Andy Greenberg is a world-class reporter and weaves a very engaging story that has deep implications for world society. The book tells the story of the cypher-punks who code the encryption and anonymity software that enables internet and computer network users to operate without connection or access to their real life personas. Whether this involves illegal markets, pirating media, malicious hacking or idealistic leaking, Greenberg examines the reasoning behind the tools and the reasoning behind [...]


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