Cloughie: Walking on Water. Brian Clough with John Sadler

Cloughie: Walking on Water. Brian Clough with John Sadler

Brian Howard Clough / Aug 24, 2019

Cloughie Walking on Water Brian Clough with John Sadler Brian Clough arguably Britains greatest ever football manager died in September at the age of His passing was marked by a minutes silence at both the Derby County and Nottingham Forest groun

  • Title: Cloughie: Walking on Water. Brian Clough with John Sadler
  • Author: Brian Howard Clough
  • ISBN: 9780755314300
  • Page: 409
  • Format: Paperback
  • Brian Clough, arguably Britains greatest ever football manager, died in September 2004 at the age of 69 His passing was marked by a minutes silence at both the Derby County and Nottingham Forest grounds and provoked a wave of tributes from across the sporting spectrum A memorial service due to be held at Derby Cathedral had to be moved to Pride Park to accommodate the faBrian Clough, arguably Britains greatest ever football manager, died in September 2004 at the age of 69 His passing was marked by a minutes silence at both the Derby County and Nottingham Forest grounds and provoked a wave of tributes from across the sporting spectrum A memorial service due to be held at Derby Cathedral had to be moved to Pride Park to accommodate the fans demand for tickets This overwhelming affection and respect was fully deserved for the man who was often described as being controversial, outspoken and opinionated His achievements in football speak for themselves he took two lowly Midlands sides to the very top, winning two consecutive European Cups, with unfashionable Nottingham Forest, in a feat that will surely never be matched by a club of similar stature died, which offer his candid and entertaining views on club directors and chairmen and on Newcastles treatment of Sir Bobby Robson, as well as his scathing analysis of Englands recent performances Cloughie also talks honestly about his battles with alcohol and the liver transplant that gave him 21 months of health and happiness.

    Brian Clough Ultimate tribute to Brian Clough The original Cloughie tribute not the best, but in the top one A wonderful tribute. Francis scored in a European Cup final but will always be LAURIE WHITWELL Even now, with run of the mill transfers including zeros than a UK Eurovision scorecard, the move made by Trevor Francis years ago has a captivating quality. North East England North East England is one of nine official regions of England at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes It covers Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear, and the area of the former county of Cleveland in North Yorkshire.The region is home to three large conurbations Teesside, Wearside, and Tyneside, the last of which is the largest of the three and the eighth most populous

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      Posted by:Brian Howard Clough
      Published :2018-010-12T00:06:29+00:00

    About "Brian Howard Clough"

      • Brian Howard Clough

        Brian Howard Clough, OBE 21 March 1935 20 September 2004 was a successful footballer and subsequently football manager, most notable for his success with Derby County and Nottingham Forest.


    1000 Comments

    1. Big head strikes again - Brian Clough was somewhat of an enigma as well as being a charismatic football manager of some repute and definitely a force to be reckoned with. This tells his story in his own words and makes for quite an interesting and entertaining read for the football fan and non-football fan alike.


    2. As an African "literary aficionado" (whatever this means!)one can only always cast envious looks at the western scenario as regards books; the way western world honours its icons via books et al makes the mind boggle this side. Like Brian Clough - always celebrated. Whereas (to take just one sporting example in Africa), the great Adegboye Onigbinde, football icon and coach for decades, does not even appear at all on ! But back to this book and Cloughie - what a Coach and Manager during his time! [...]


    3. I always liked Brian Clough from vague memories of him with Forest in the late 1970s and early 1980s. However, when I started reading this book, the part about his upbringing wasn't particularly well-written, was repetitive, slightly tiresome in its Northernness, then he mentioned something about shooting grouse and egg collecting which put me right off after only about 30-40 pages.I persevered and gradually everything improved. The whole Hartlepool, Derby, Leeds, Forest sagas are very interesti [...]


    4. one of the best book i've ever read, story about brian clough one of the most succesfull football manager in Britain,this book told us from his child life, beginning his carrer in Middlesbrough which he very dissapointed because although he scores many goals Boro never got promotion. Sunderland trasferred him and unfortunately at 29 years of age he got knee injury that made him hung up his boots. he is very sad but found himself a new beginning as a manager. With Peter Taylor his best mate he br [...]


    5. This is THE book about Brian Clough, as he charts the highs and the lows. The alcoholism that fuelled his demise was a sad demise, a tragic period of his life, which we mustn't allow to overshadow the incredible achievements. This guy won, after all, two European Cups with a tenth of the budget of most of the clubs competing at the time - and most of all, he won them in style. I once played against Nigel while his dad was watching on the touchline - what an honour.


    6. Very funny, down to Earth and opinionated in the best way, Clough makes this book an enjoyable read. In order to appreciate this book fully it helps if you’re a football fan (as you’d expect). Clough is honest about his struggles with alcohol and how it undermined him in his final years at Nottingham Forest, and often criticises himself and other managers. The narrative structure could have been better- at times it feels slightly incoherent. Overall though, a great read for an autobiography [...]



    7. I'm a 42 year old American who is only familiar with Brian Clough through the book and movie of The Damned United. A friend lent me this biography and I'm glad he did. Although I was a bit lost in the discussion of some of the players and matches, I was able to take away a nice message from this book. Clough, when discussing his coaching style and how he came into the game, made some nice unintentional parallels with everyone's struggle with work, where they fit into the world and what kind of m [...]


    8. Controversial, no holds barred and brutally honest. Just what you would expect from Cloughie, who is certainly the best manager the England football team never had, and quite possibly the best football manager ever, as he takes great pains to point out himself on more than one occasion. There is a bit too much of this, and a bit too much of his fight with the booze, otherwise this book is all you could wish from an autobiography. Overall, excellent.


    9. Could have been more succinct. Should be read in conjunction with Clough-The Autobiography, since at places this is an expansion on what has been said there. The expansions are the best parts of this, and Clough's charm really comes through in them. The last few chapters though are mainly pieces of footballing criticism about people and teams in the early 2000s that Clough dictated, and are of little interest, plus they are overdone in their tabloidease


    10. Says it plain and says it how it is, the greatest English man in modern day football, Clough was known as 'Big Head', his achievements at Derby and Nottingham Forest eclipse other footballing greats. Clough gives a frank and honest view about his life, his time as a player and manager and the perils of modern day football. What he said in 2003 still makes sense today as the people's game is now the commercial game.


    11. Easily one of the best football autobiographies I've ever read, indeed probably one of the best autobiographies I've ever read in any category.Brian Clough is very candid, very intelligent and very funny.He comes across as caring, smart and with a brilliant appetite for lifeI have to agree that his is most definitely the best manager that England never had and his death is a very sad loss to football and the world.If you like biographies or football you have to read this book!


    12. Interesting to read Brian Clough's take on things after reading David Peace's fictionalized account of his Derby & Leeds years. I enjoyed a lot of it but sometimes found his infamous "Old Big 'Ead" arrogance and conceit a little hard to take. Still, fascinating insight into what HE thinks it takes to be a successful manager (and player) in English football.


    13. As I've read a very sad book about the Hillsborough disaster and the long and protracted inquests, I'm sorry to say I've read this. Clough always believed till his dying day that Liverpool supporters were responsible for the tragedy and wouldn't be persuaded otherwise. From a man I considered wise in his knowledge regarding football, it's a sad way to remember someone of his standing.


    14. About as coherent a book as the author became in his later life. It jumps backwards and forwards from one subject to another all the way through. A very strange book, that is quite fun to read but would suggest one of the biographies of the man would be a better bet.


    15. This is the biography of one of the most successful coaches in the history of English football. More of an ancient Jose Maurinho you might want to call him. And if you're still doubting the enormous danger in alcohol consumption then read this.


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